How popular is the baby name Pippa in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Pippa and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Pippa.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Pippa

Number of Babies Named Pippa

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Pippa

Royal Baby Name: Farida

farida, queen, egypt, 1938, baby nameYou may already know that the 2011 royal wedding of William and Kate in London helped boost the usage of Pippa, the name of Kate’s sister.

But did you know that several long-ago royal couples from a very different region of the world gave similar boosts to a handful of Arabic baby names in the U.S. — as far back as the 1930s?

In January of 1938, 17-year-old King Farouk of Egypt married 16-year-old Farida Zulficar in Cairo. LIFE made Farida a cover girl in February. The magazine even correctly defined her name as “unique” in the accompanying story.

Right on cue, the baby name Farida appeared for the first time in the U.S. baby name data:

  • 1939: unlisted
  • 1938: 6 baby girls named Farida [debut]
  • 1937: unlisted

The name dropped off the charts the next year, but returned a few decades later. These days, dozens of U.S. babies are named Farida every year.

Interestingly, Farida Zulficar’s first name at birth was not Farida. It was Safinaz. (The components safi and naz mean “pure” and “pride” in Arabic.)

Why the name change? Because Farouk’s father Fuad had decided that all members of the royal family should have identical initials (to match his initials, naturally). Hence, the five children he had with his second wife were named Farouk, Fawzia, Faiza, Faika, and Fathia. To fit the pattern, Safinaz’s name was changed to Farida before her marriage to Farouk.

Farouk and Farida went on to have three F-named daughters — Ferial, Fawzia, and Fadia — before divorcing a decade later. Several years after that, Farouk was deposed.

Do you like the name Farida? Do you like it more or less than Safinaz?

Sources:


Popular Baby Names in New Zealand, 2013

New Zealand’s top baby names of 2013 were announced last week.

According to NZ’s Department of Internal Affairs, the country’s most popular names of 2013 were Charlotte and Oliver.

Here are the top 25 girl names and top 25 boy names of 2013:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Charlotte
2. Emily
3. Ruby
4. Sophie
5. Olivia
6. Isla
7. Amelia
8. Ava
9. Isabella
10. Ella
11. Chloe
12. Grace
13. Mia
14. Lily
15. Emma
16. Sophia
17. Lucy
18. Mila
19. Harper
20. Zoe
21. Georgia
22. Paige
23. Hannah
24. Aria
25. Jessica
1. Oliver
2. Jack
3. James
4. William
5. Mason
6. Liam
7. Samuel
8. Lucas
9. Noah
10. Thomas
11. Hunter
12. Ethan
13. Jacob
14. Benjamin
15. Daniel
16. Max
17. Joshua
18. Ryan
19. Cooper
20. Blake
21. Lachlan
22. Charlie
23. Levi
24. Leo
25. Elijah

Girl names on the rise include Isla, Mila, Aria, Eden (30th), Willow (33rd) and Pippa (44th).

Boy names on the rise include Hunter and Elijah.

Another boy name — Braxton — debuted at #28 on the NZ top 100 in 2012 and was still going strong in 2013 at 29th. The explanation for Braxton’s sudden popularity could be the Australian soap opera Home and Away, which is popular in NZ. In 2011, the show introduced a trio of brothers named Darryl “Brax” Braxton, Heath Braxton and Casey Braxton. The eldest, Brax, seems to have emerged as the favorite Braxton brother.

Sources: The baby names NZ loves, Most Popular Male and Female First Names

Is the Name Cressida About to Get a Boost?

The royal family has given me a lot to blog about in the last few years — Pippa in 2011, Jubilee in 2012, the royal baby name (twice!) in 2013…

So will the royal-inspired baby name of 2014 be Cressida?

The gossip sites are telling me that Prince Harry and his girlfriend, socialite Cressida Bonas, may marry next year. Apparently Harry met Cressie (as friends call her) via cousin Eugenie.

Where does the name Cressida come from?

We know it from Shakespeare’s play Troilus and Cressida (1602). Cressida is a medieval form of the Greek name Chryseis, which Shakespeare would have known from Homers’ Iliad. In the Iliad, Chryseis (as her name indicates) was the daughter of Chryses, whose name was derived from the ancient Greek word chrysos, meaning “gold” or “golden.”

How are Cressida and Cressie doing on the charts right now?

  • The baby name Cressida has appeared on the SSA’s list a handful of times, mostly in the 1970s and 1980s, but no more than 8 Cressidas have ever been born in a single year. It was last listed in 1990.
  • The baby name Cressie has had better luck, though it was more popular during the 1910s and 1920s than it is today. It was last listed in 1987.

If Harry and Cressie marry next year, do you think the royal wedding will popularize the name Cressida in the U.S.?

(And if they don’t, do you think there’s a chance the name could become trendy anyway thanks to the third Hunger Games film, due out in late 2014?)

Source: Prince Harry planning to marry Cressida Bonas, friends say

Other predictions so far for 2013: D’Ussé, Lincoln, Cypher, Elon, Macklemore, Elon, Malala, Gatsby, and more.

Eusebia, Cyrian, Albina, Garin – Possible Royal Baby Names?

Prince William and Kate MiddletonIn early December, we learned that Prince William and Catherine “Kate” Middleton were expecting.

Many other name bloggers have since posted great lists of potential royal baby names (like this one, and this one).

Because others have already covered the topic, and because I’m not incredibly interested in the royal family, I was on the fence about bothering with a similar post.

And then, rather fortuitously, I received a fun Ancestry.ca press release revealing some of the more unusual names in William’s and Kate’s respective family trees. So I’ll go ahead and post that (plus a couple of polls!) instead:

NEVER MIND ‘ELIZABETH’ – ROYAL BABY COULD BE A ‘LANCELOT’, ‘BONIFACE’ OR ‘GRISSEL’

Unusual first names in the royal couple’s family trees uncovered as pregnancy is announced – Ancestry.ca

If Prince William and Kate Middleton decide to take baby-name inspiration from their forebears, the royal baby could be born a ‘Grissel’, ‘Boniface’ or even ‘Lancelot’.

New research from Ancestry.ca, Canada’s leading family history website, reveals that while ‘Elizabeth’ and ‘John’ are the most common boys and girls names in both family trees, there are several more unusual choices the young royals could opt for.

The royal family tree contains the most unusual names – with Boniface, Cyrian, Marmaduke, Slyvanus and Lancelot all featuring in the male line, while Eusebia, Honor, Thomasin, Ursula and Hyacinth appear for the females.

And while many of Kate’s female ancestors have more recognizable names, her ancestors weren’t without some interesting monikers as well. Among the boys are Garin, Lewen, Theophilus, Uriah and Elie, together with girls called Permelia, Albina, Edezer, Grissel and Jemima.

To discover unusual names in your family’s past, visit Ancestry.ca and sign up for a 14-day free trial.

Let’s play a game. Let’s say William and Kate are required (by decree of the Queen!) to use one of the unusual names above. And let’s also say the couple want to hear your opinion on the matter. (Again, highly plausible!) Which two royal baby names — one boy name, one girl name — would you recommend to them?

Which male royal baby name would you pick?

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Which female royal baby name would you pick?

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Image: Will & Kate on the balcony by Magnus D

Harry & Amelia – Top Baby Names in England, 2011

According to the Office for National Statistics, the new top baby names in England and Wales are Harry and Amelia.

They beat out 2010’s top names Oliver and Olivia.

Here are the current top 25 names for both boys and girls:

Boy Names Girl Names
1. Harry
2. Oliver
3. Jack
4. Alfie
5. Charlie
6. Thomas
7. Jacob
8. James
9. Joshua
10. William
11. Ethan
12. George
13. Riley
14. Daniel
15. Samuel
16. Noah
17. Oscar
18. Joseph
19. Mohammed
20. Max
21. Dylan
22. Muhammad
23. Alexander
24. Archie
25. Benjamin
1. Amelia
2. Olivia
3. Lily
4. Jessica
5. Emily
6. Sophie
7. Ruby
8. Grace
9. Ava
10. Isabella
11. Evie
12. Chloe
13. Mia
14. Poppy
15. Isla
16. Ella
17. Isabelle
18. Sophia
19. Freya
20. Daisy
21. Charlotte
22. Maisie
23. Lucy
24. Phoebe
25. Scarlett

In Wales specifically, the top names were Oliver and Lily. In London, Daniel and Isabella.

A few other things I noticed…

Usage of Pippa increased in 2011, thanks to the royal wedding:

  • 2011: 250 baby girls named Pippa (rank: 204th)
  • 2010: 124 baby girls named Pippa (rank: 365th)
  • 2009: 125 baby girls named Pippa (rank: 351st)

Usage of another quirky P-name, Pixie, is also on the up thanks to English pop star Pixie Lott:

  • 2011: 99 baby girls named Pixie (rank: 432nd)
    • +6 named Pixie-Lou
    • +5 named Pixie-Leigh
  • 2010: 83 baby girls named Pixie (rank: 485th)
    • +3 named Pixie-Lou
    • +3 named Pixie-Rose
  • 2009: 33 baby girls named Pixie (rank: 982nd)

I also spotted 5 baby girls named Renesmee, 4 named Coraline and 4 named Io.

The most insightful article I’ve seen about this batch of names so far is Ed West’s “Britain’s divided nation is revealed in our baby names.” Some snippets:

  • “…the annually-published list does show that, for the first time in nine centuries, English people are easily identifiable by class solely by their name, since most names in the 2011 list have strong class biases either way.”
  • “Social mobility will be achieved only when we all give our children the same names.”

Have you spotted anything interesting or surprising on the England and Wales 2011 list?