How popular is the baby name Pitbull in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Pitbull and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Pitbull.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Pitbull

Number of Babies Named Pitbull

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Pitbull

How Many Scottish Babies Got Name Changes in 2012?

Name changes are on the rise in Scotland. Last year, 3,221 people in Scotland changed their first names. This number includes 1,129 children under the age of sixteen and 311 babies under the age of two.

Are name changes for children a good idea?

Depends upon the child’s age, says Strathclyde University psychology professor Kevin Durkin: “If a child is old enough to know his or her name and has begun to identify with it, parents should proceed with great caution.” (Though, if the original name is a horrible as Pitbull Shotgun, I’m sure any age is just fine.)

Have you ever wanted to change your child’s name?

P.S. Name changes are trendy in Thailand right now as well.

Source: Parents who have changed their baby’s name reveal why they took action


Name Changed from Pitbull to Peter

I discovered this doozie of a name the other day: Pitbull Shotgun. It once belonged to a boy in Santa Clara, California. He was born in 1986.

I searched for him online (Badlands has a Facebook page, after all) but didn’t find him. Instead, I found this in a newspaper from early 1991:

name change, pitbull to peter

Among the name change preceedings [sic] listed for Santa Clara, Calif., in July was the petition by a young boy, originally named Pitbull Shotgun Collier, to change his name to Peter Collier.

Good. Nothing left for me to mock, but I’m very happy the name was changed.

Ditto for Talula Does The Hula From Hawaii.

Source: “‘Guardians’ married for cause, no love.” Daily Idahonian 24 Jan. 1991: 6B.