How popular is the baby name Princess in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Princess and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Princess.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Princess

Number of Babies Named Princess

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Princess

Top Dog Names in New York City, 2015

yorkshire terrier, dog names NYC
Gucci? Chanel?
According to the New York City Department of Health, Bella and Max were the most popular names for licensed dogs* in New York City in 2015.

Here are NYC’s top female dog names:

  1. Bella (…vs. 69th for baby girls in NY state, 2015)
  2. Lola (…267th)
  3. Lucy (…88th)
  4. Daisy (…271st)
  5. Coco
  6. Princess
  7. Molly (…128th)
  8. Chloe (…14th)
  9. Luna (…129th)
  10. Sophie (…77th)

And here are NYC’s top male dog names:

  1. Max (…vs. 85th for baby boys in NY state, 2015)
  2. Rocky
  3. Charlie (…236th)
  4. Buddy
  5. Lucky
  6. Teddy
  7. Toby (…760th)
  8. Jack (…23rd)
  9. Oliver (…32nd)
  10. Milo (…270th)

Uniquely popular names by breed include Snoopy for beagles, Tyson for boxers, Lulu for French bulldogs, Chico for chihuahuas, Frank for dachshunds, Dolly for poodles, Mugsy for pugs, Snow for Siberian huskies, and Chanel and Gucci for Yorkshire terriers.

On this map of unique dog names by neighborhood I see Baci (bah-chee, Italian for “kisses”), Boomer, Brutus, Frankie, Katie, Mochi, Ollie, Penelope, and Taz.

For less common NYC dog names, check out the dog names by frequency of occurrence page. Mousing over the bubbles I see 4 Tictacs, 3 Zombies, 2 Orbits, and 1 Chopstick.

Sources: Health Department Announces 2015’s Most Popular Dog Names, And the most popular dog name in New York is…

*The 84,000+ licensed dogs represent about 20% of all the dogs in NYC.

Rejected Baby Names in Victoria, Australia

We know what Victoria’s most popular baby names were last year, but what about the names that got rejected?

The Australian state gave a thumbs down to the following in 2013:

  • Anarchy
  • Fireman Sam (a Welsh cartoon character)
  • Honest Mary
  • Glory Hallelujah New Covernant (sic)
  • Lord
  • Prince
  • Princess
  • Princess Diana
  • Tit
  • Wonderful Beautiful

Among the odd-but-approved baby names? Jazz, Pepper, Reef and Texan.

(Tit reminds me of Atit, which is a one-hit wonder on the U.S. list.)

Source: Royalty and religion among Victoria’s banned baby names

Kenyan Man Bemoans “Naming Crisis”

Joseph Maina, contributing writer at Kenyan newspaper The Standard, believes his country is in the midst of a “naming crisis.”

It all started like a joke, but our neighbourhood is now inundated with ‘modern’ names like Chavez Mwangi, Honda Otieno, Superman Wafula and World Cup Mutai.

Among the girls, we have Martinas, Tiaras and Princesses; and this has given rise to all manner of hideous permutations.

He also knows of children named Beyonce, Dolly-Parton, Mary Christmas, Timberlake and Tupac.

“The list is growing, and there seems to be no end to this dizzying cocktail of ridiculous christenings.”

Source: Some names are bad jokes

Another Unnecessarily Long Baby Name

This baby didn’t get 139 names, but 49 is still excessive, don’t you think?

Diana and Arthur Martello of New Brighton, Pennsylvania, had a baby girl in May of 1989 and gave her 49 names. (Initially it was just 43, but they added 6 more a few weeks later.)

Here are all 49 names:

Princess India Rosa Kathleen Pearla Meshelle Suzanne Luchianna Irena Iris Veronica Donna Holly Robin Concha Kristian Tonya Elizabeth Joana Magali Lavinia Ruth Sandy Lori Appolonia Concepteone Stephenie Victoria Ira Maria Jane Claudia Pamela Shirley Mellissa Leah Rebecca Simone Alana Loren Joy Angie Pheonix Cynthia Christine Eleanor Meg Sophia Eunice

Diana was the one who came up with them. She said her inspiration included TV shows like Matt Houston, T.J. Hooker, Santa Barbara, and The Young and the Restless.

If you could go back in time and rename this baby girl, which two names (out of the 49) would you choose as her first and middle names?


  • Musala, Jane C. “A Nickname Makes it 45.” Allegheny Times 30 May 1989: A3.
  • Musala, Jane C. “The Good News is Short-Lived.” Allegheny Times 28 Jun. 1989: A3.

Popular and Unique Names in Alberta, 2011

I saw a lot of news last week about baby names in Alberta, Canada. The news didn’t focus on the Alberta’s most popular names of 2011, which happen to be these:

Boy Names Girl Names
1. Liam
2. Ethan
3. Mason
4. Lucas
5. Jacob
6. Benjamin
7. Alexander
8. Noah
9. William
10. Logan
1. Olivia
2. Sophia
3. Emma
4. Emily
5. Ava
6. Chloe
7. Abigail
8. Lily
9. Brooklyn
10. Sophie

…but on Alberta’s unique names, which is something that I’ve been writing about for years (literally: 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009).

The official list of Albertan baby names isn’t ready yet, but preliminary data is available via the Edmonton Journal. Here are some oddball names I spotted on the Journal’s list:

Boy Names Girl Names
Crevance, Dawnwalker, Dybry, Flourish, Goliath, Jheizzller, Knowledge-Tree*, Lefarius, Llord-Xedric, Madrid, Matt-Dainon, Moo, Moxon, Nzoputa, Princelife, Pure, Spyder, Mskr, Tata-peh, Wanderingspirit, Wisherlee, Vedder April-May, Chaz-a-rae, Cupid, Dayleigh, Dazzelyn, Duffni, Eirachloe, Evolet, Glennizelle, Gobza, Laker-Lynn, Mississippi, Nomalisa, Phetlunda, Psanatcsakor, Q’Tyyr’N, Rainejewelle, Sheamus, Starr-shine, Thespina, Thipphaphone, Vylet, Xyza, Zxyvian

*I’m guessing at the last letter; I think it was cut off.

Many of the news articles also claimed that baby names in Alberta had been inspired by royals William and Kate, who visited Canada last July. This could be true — there were a few more Princes and Dukes than usual in 2011:

  • 2011: 199 Williams, 50 Kates, 8 Princes, 6 Princesses, 9 Dukes, 0 Duchesses
  • 2010: 184 Williams, 44 Kates, 5 Princes, 5 Princesses, 0 Dukes, 0 Duchesses
  • 2009: 198 Williams, 67 Kates, 5 Princes, 2 Princesses, 2 Dukes, 0 Duchesses
  • 2008: 178 Williams, 68 Kates, 4 Princes, 0 Princesses, 3 Dukes, 0 Duchesses
  • 2007: 185 Williams, 67 Kates, 5 Princes, 1 Princess, 3 Dukes, 0 Duchesses

The names Kate and William didn’t move too much, though.

Baby Name News (& Snark) from 1858

A great passage about “absurd” baby names, published in London’s Chambers’s Journal way back in 1858:

No names are too absurd for parents to give their children. Here are innocents stamped for life as Kidnum Toats, Lavender Marjoram, Patient Pipe, Tabitha Cumi, Fussy Gotobed, and, strangest of all, here is one called Eli Lama Sabachthani Pressnail! Other parents are more ambitious, and prematurely ennoble their children by designating them Lord, Earl, Princess Charlotte, &c.; whislt, during the Russian war, numbers of poor things were labeled Malakoff, Sebastopol, Redan, Inkermann, and Balaklava. Florence Nightingale, however, seems to have been the greatest favourite, especially amongst the poor, who have shewn their admiration for her by perpetuating her name in their families all over the country. The returns for the last two years would shew that Florence has become a much commoner name lately.

Some thoughts…

Tabitha Cumi
“And he took the damsel by the hand, and said to her, Talitha cumi; which is, being interpreted, Damsel, I say to you, arise.” Mark 5:41

Fussy Gotobed
This could be my new favorite baby name of all time. Is it legit? I can’t find anyone named “Fussy Gotobed” specifically, but the surname Gotobed is real, and I’ve found a dozens people named Fussy, so it’s certainly plausible.

Eli Lama Sabachthani Pressnail
Jesus’s last words on the cross were “Eloi, Eloi, Lama Sabachthani?” meaning “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

Malakoff, Sebastopol, etc.
Names inspired by the Crimean War (1853-1856):

In birth records from the mid-19th century, I’ve found all five of the above. I’ve also found variants (e.g., Balaclava, Inkerman, Sevastopol) plus a few other Crimea-inspired names (e.g., Alma, Crimea, Eupatoria).

Several locations (e.g. Inkerman in Renfrewshire, Scotland) were given Crimea-inspired names during the war as well.

Florence Nightingale
This one may be the biggest Crimean War name, in a sense. Nightingale first gained fame for treating the injured in the Crimean War. She was known as The Lady with the Lamp.

I don’t have reliable numbers for 19th-century England, but many baby girls in England were named “Florence Nightingale” between the 1850s and the early 1900s.

In the U.S., Florence became popular during the same period, quite possibly for the same reason:

Years Census of 1850 Census of 1880 Census of 1920
1801-1810 <10 Florences x x
1811-1820 <10 Florences x x
1821-1830 <10 Florences x x
1831-1840 12 Florences
(rank: ~95th)
x x
1841-1850 62 Florences
(rank: 52nd)
52 Florences
(rank: 52nd)
1851-1860 x 240 Florences
(rank: 33rd)
1861-1870 x 416 Florences
(rank: 29th)
1871-1880 x 746 Florences
(rank: 19th)
584 Florences
(rank: 18th)
1881-1890 x x 931 Florences
(rank: 13th)
1891-1900 x x 1,428 Florences
(rank: 9th)
1901-1910 x x 1,464 Florences
(rank: 11th)
1911-1920 x x 1,366 Florences
(rank: 17th)

P.S. That paragraph from 1858 is the second-oldest bit of baby name news I’ve been able to scrounge up so far. The oldest is from 1853.


  • Chambers, William and Robert Chambers. “Births, Deaths, and Marriages.” Chambers’s Journal of Popular Literature, Science, and Arts 6 Mar. 1858: 156.
  • Popular Given Names, US, 1801-1999

Baby Named Princess, Take 2

In July of 1986, a baby girl was born to Isle of Skye residents Hugh and Audrey Manwaring-Spencer. She was named Princess Dulcima Rosetta.

So the birth certificate was filled out, the necessary paperwork was sent to the General Register Office in Edinburgh, and all was well…until five months later, when Hugh and Audrey received a letter from the GRO:

Based upon an Order in Council of 1910, the name Princess is not a recognized forename in this country because it is part of the Crown’s royal prerogative and cannot be assumed or entered in any register or official document without the consent of the sovereign.

The GRO not only rejected the name, but demanded that the birth certificate be returned.

The parents wrote to Queen Elizabeth instead.

In December of 1987, the queen’s private secretary responded:

You may rest assured that you have caused no offense to the queen and you may continue to use the word as your daughter’s Christian name.

But three weeks later, in a second letter, he flip-flopped:

The name will have to be omitted from the birth certificate. However…there is no objection to you and your family continuing to use the word Princess as the name by which your daughter is known to her friends and family.

And then the GRO sent another birth certificate demand-letter.

Finally, in early 1989, the GRO backed down and decided to accept the name Princess. The Manwaring-Spencer family, including little non-princess Princess, had emerged triumphant.

How common is the name Princess in Scotland nowadays? Not very. Here are some recent numbers:

  • 1 in 2011
  • 7 in 2010 (including Princess-Skye and Princess-Tamia)
  • 2 in 2009
  • 4 in 2008 (including Princess-Vanessa)
  • 2 in 2007

And, while Princess is now permitted in the UK, it’s still verboten elsewhere. For instnace, it’s the 2nd-most-rejected name in New Zealand, after Justice.

(See take 1.)