How popular is the baby name Rejoice in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Rejoice and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Rejoice.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Rejoice

Number of Babies Named Rejoice

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Rejoice

The Baby Name “Burjoice”

I found the following story in a 106-year-old newspaper article about Southern names. No doubt many of the names/stories in the piece were made-up (urban legends, perhaps) but this one had such weirdly specific details that I’m hoping it was true.

Around in the next cove was the boy, Burjoice Robbins, whose mother derived even greater satisfaction from his curiously un-Christian Christian name. The Cumberland Presbyterian preacher who christened the child insisted on calling him “Rejoice,” and that is the way it is written in the church record. The explanation is simple in the extreme. That summer a learned man ran away from the city to the seclusion of the mountains while he was reading proof on a profound work that was being printed in Chattanooga. Every few days a youth would come out from the printing office with a bunch of galley proofs and there was always a discussion of the type. The learned man wanted some paragraphs set up in small pica, for emphasis, and certain foot notes set up in nonpareil, but the body of the text was to be in bourgeois, which the printer’s helper invariably pronounced “burjoice.” Whenever the writer said anything about “bourzhwa” the youth repeated it after him, making the correction in pronunciation, “burjoice.” The mother of the little boy was convinced that this wonderful thing, which was to play such an important part in a learned book, would make the grandest name her son could possibly have. Even when the preacher said it was heathen she did not yield, writing it in the family bible, in defiance of the church record.

The words “pica,” “nonpareil,” and “bourgeois” refer to letter sizes that predate the point system we use today (e.g., 12-point Times New Roman, 10-point Arial).

And here’s a twist: In the world of printing, the word “bourgeois” was indeed pronounced burjoice. So the printer’s helper was correct in making his correction. :)

Source: “Peculiar Names Found in the Southern States.” San Francisco Call 28 Sep. 1912: 2.

Popular and Unique Names in England and Wales, 2008

Don’t get too excited — these aren’t the top names for 2009. (If only!)

Why am I posting old news? Because I recently found a more complete version of the 2008 list that goes all the way down to baby names used in England and Wales just three times. So, the top-ranked names may be old news, but the rest are new. (New to me, anyway.) Here goes:

Boys Girls
Popular Names Jack
Oliver
Thomas
Harry
Joshua
Olivia
Ruby
Emily
Grace
Jessica
Unusual names
(# of babies)
Spike (23)
Willoughby (22)
Ziggy (20)
Ptolemy (19)
Zidane (13)
Zinedine (12)
Kal-El (10)
Hendrix (9)
Humphrey (8)
Elan (6)
Gruff (6)
Legend (6)
Achilles (5)
Amen (5)
Bright (5)
Jesse-James (5)
Tennyson (5)
Darlington (4)
James-Dean (4)
Courage (3)
Freedom (3)
Messiah (3)
Remus (3)
Riquelme (3)
Seven (3)
Bluebell (20)
Primrose (17)
Temperance (13)
Breeze (11)
Cleopatra (11)
Sorrel (11)
Tigerlily (9)
Tirion (9)
Comfort (8)
Peaches (8)
Pebbles (8)
Beyonce (7)
Miami (7)
Zinnia (7)
Godiva (6)
Mercades (5)
Panashe (5)
Tulip (5)
Wednesday (5)
Magenta (4)
Boadicea (3)
Cayenne (3)
Kimora-Lee (3)
Plum (3)
Rejoice (3)

And now, just for fun, let’s compare usage in England to usage in America:

Name # UK* Boys # UK Girls # U.S. Boys # U.S. Girls
Avery 4 6 1,731 5,758
Harper 18 20 244 1,108
Mackenzie
Makenzie
Mckenzie
361
28
462
53
9
66
?**
?
?
4,425
2,048
2,258
Riley 2,201 63 4,076 5,701
Total*** 363,000 346,000 2,150,000 2,060,000

*By UK, I mean England and Wales. Not an accurate substitution, I know. But “England and Wales” is just way too long for that spot.
**The 1,000th name on the U.S. top 1,000 was used for 192 baby boys. So the question marks represent some number between 0 and 192.
***Update: Kelly has astutely pointed out that raw numbers can be misleading. I’m not going to change the chart — I’m just too lazy — but I’ve thrown in some rough totals, for context.

Source: Office for National Statistics