How popular is the baby name Rex in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Rex and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Rex.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Rex

Number of Babies Named Rex

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Rex

A Boy Named After a Toy?

radio rex, census
Radio Rex (b. 1924) on 1940 U.S. Census

According to the census, a teenage boy named “Radio Rex Musselman” was living in Ohio in 1940.

Know what Radio Rex was? A relatively high-tech toy of the 1920s.

radio rex

Radio Rex was the first children’s toy to respond to voice commands. Rex the dog would spring out of his doghouse at the sound of the word “Rex,” thanks to a sound-sensitive electromagnet.

Radio Rex went on the market in 1922. It cost about $2, which today would be about $29.

But let’s get back to Radio Rex Musselman. Do you think “Radio Rex” was his real name?

He’s listed as “Rex R.” in most places, including the 1930 census and his headstone, but there’s no mention of “Radio” in any other record I’ve found.

Those circled x-marks on the census indicate that the family’s information came straight from parents Royal and Hazel. Do you think they were telling the truth that day, or do you think they were messing with the enumerator?

Sources:


Family of Food Names: Taco, Apple, Chili, Bran…

Florida-born rugby player Taco Pope — who’s in the Jacksonville Axemen Hall of Fame and who made it to the NOTY Final Four last year — comes from a family full of food-names.

He has brothers named Apple-Joe and Pepci. His mother, Chili-Lu, has a brother named Pepar and a sister named Cofi. Pepar has a daughter named Colby (“after the cheese”). Cofi has four children named Sage, Bran, Cinnamon-T and Dentyne (“after the American chewing gum brand”).

The initial food names were thought up by grandparents Rex and Dortha Lou. Dortha Lou’s nickname? “Pork.”

So does Taco Pope like his name? He told one reporter that it had never been a hindrance. On the contrary, it was “a good conversation starter.”

Sources: Taco and Apple take the cake, Obituary of Rex Marion Anspaugh

[For more edible appellations, check out this list of unusual names, which includes Apple Pie, Apple Seed, Lemon Lime, Orange Lemon, and more.]

Ti-Grace, ‘Tit Carl, and T-Rex – Cajun Nicknames

A number of Cajuns have nicknames prefixed with “Tee” “Ti,” “Tit,” “T,” and so forth — all pronounced tee. This prefix is derived from the French word petit, meaning “small” or “little.” It typically denotes a namesake/junior, or else the youngest child in a family.

In a blog post about Cajun French, writer Ramona DeFelice Long noted that “[o]n the bayou, a T-Rex would not be a dinosaur. T-Rex would be a boy named Rex who was named after his father named Rex.”

Linda Barth, author of The Distinctive Book of Redneck Baby Names, compared the prefix to the diminutive suffix -ie and gave the example of ‘Tit Carl as being “sort of the Cajun version” of Carlie.

Speaking of examples…Ti-Grace Atkinson (b. 1938) played a prominent role in the early radical feminist movement. She was born “Grace” in Baton Rouge, but has always gone by “Ti-Grace.” Here’s why:

My mother’s family was from Virginia. I was named for my Grandmother, whom I adored. My father’s family was from Pennsylvania. I kept the “Ti” which is Cajun, and I kept it because I knew I was going to live in the North and I did not want to forget or let anybody else forget that that was part of my heritage.

In the late ’60s and early ’70s, Ti-Grace was mentioned in articles about militant feminism in Life, Newsweek, the New York Times, Esquire, and elsewhere. Though her name never ended up on the SSA’s baby name list, I did find records for two non-Louisiana females born in the early ’70s and named Ti-Grace, thanks to her influence.

Her name came in particularly handy (from her perspective) when she ran away from home as a teenager:

They had hired detectives to find me, but because my first name is so difficult, the detectives kept getting lost. Nobody would ever put it down right, thank God.

Have you ever met someone with a Cajun T- (or Ti-, or Tee-, etc.) nickname?

Sources:

Which Baby Names Can Be Split in Two?

baby names split in two

In 1916, the London Globe mentioned twins named Jere and Miah:

There lived for many years in the village of Twerton, Bath, one named Miah. He was born a twin, and his parents thriftily divided the predestined name of Jeremiah between them, the other babe being christened Jere.

What other names could we divide into two usable mini-names like this?

Here are a few ideas to kick things off…

Abigail, Abi + Gail
Anastasia, Ana + Stasia
Calista, Cal + Ista
Drusilla, Dru + Silla
Elizabeth, Eliza + Beth
Mozelle, Mo + Zelle
Valentina, Valen + Tina
Alexander, Alex + Ander
Christopher, Chris + Topher
Denzel, Den + Zel
Donovan, Dono + Van
Joseph, Jo + Seph
Rexford, Rex + Ford
William, Wil + Liam

…what others can you think of?

Source: “Some Odd Christian Names.” Bee [Earlington, KY] 8 Dec. 1916: 8.

Baby Name Needed – Brother of Jett Royce

One of my readers is expecting a baby boy in a matter of days and she’d like some last-minute name suggestions.

The baby will have one older sibling, a brother named Jett Royce. The surname sounds like Adlard.

Jett’s given names are both quite short, so I’m going to stick to the pattern and suggest…

Blake
Brent
Caleb
Cole
Dale
Dane
Dax
Drake
Drew (or Andrew)
Finn
Grant
Gray
Heath
Hugh
Lance
Lane
Levi
Luke
Mark
Max
Neil
Noah
Owen
Pierce
Quinn
Rex
Tate
Tom (or Thomas)
Trent
Troy
Ty
Zane

Which of the above do you like best for Jett’s little brother? What other names would you suggest?