How popular is the baby name Rob in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Rob and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Rob.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Rob

Number of Babies Named Rob

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Rob

Baseball Team to Name Coach’s Baby Boy

You're killing me, Smalls (Sandlot quote)

The varsity baseball team at Heritage High School in Palm Bay, Florida, had never had a winning season.

So this season, coach Rob Querry made his players a promise: Win 14 (out of 25) games, and you guys can name my baby.

Rob and his wife Julia are expecting their second son in September. Their first, Brady, is four years old.

On April 5, the team managed to win its 14th game.

The name they’ve chosen for baby Querry? Benjamin Smalls, inspired by Benny Rodriguez and Scotty Smalls, characters from the baseball comedy The Sandlot (1993).

I think it’s slightly daring to go with Smalls as a middle name because of the whole “You’re killing me, Smalls” thing. Still, Smalls is far better than Squints.

(Speaking of Squints…the actress who played his crush, Wendy Peffercorn, named her daughter West thanks to a dream.)

Source: Oh, Baby! Heritage High wins 14th, tot-naming rights

Update, 8/3: Benjamin Smalls Ellis Querry was born in July 27. (Source: Florida Today)


What’s the Most Common Name in the U.S. Senate?

In early 2011, the blog Smart Politics analyzed the first names of all the U.S. Senators elected or appointed within the last 100 years.

In total, there were 884 senators and 313 names.

The most common names were these:

  1. John (including Jon, Jonathan, and Johnny) – total of 65 senators (7.4%)
  2. William (including Bill) – 50 (5.7%)
  3. James (including Jim) – 44 (5.0%)
  4. Robert (including Bob and Rob) – 34 (3.9%)
  5. Thomas (including Tom) – 29 (3.3%)
  6. George – 25 (2.8%)
  7. Charles (including Chuck) – 22 (2.5%)
  8. Joseph (including Joe) – 21 (2.4%)
  9. Frank – 17 (1.9%)
  10. Richard (including Rick and Dick) – 16 (1.8%)

Some of the unique names were Spessard, Furnifold, Zales, Xenophon, Olympia, Orrin, Rand, Saxby, Sherrod and Barack.

Names that have become popular recently in the Senate include Mark and Mike/Michael.

Source: What’s in a Name? From Abraham to Zell, 100 Years of U.S. Senators

Baby Names in Cursive – Clarabelle, Jefferson, Mercedes, Rebecca

I wrote a letter to a friend not long ago, and the act of writing something longhand (which I rarely do anymore) made me wonder: which baby names can be written in cursive without lifting the pen from the page?

Turns out that many names can be written this way–so long as they don’t contain letters that need crossing/dotting (t, i, x, j) and don’t start with a tricky capital (such as W, which doesn’t connect to the letters that follow, or H, which itself requires more than one pen-stroke to be formed correctly).

Here are some examples of names that can be written in script with one continuous line of ink.

  • 3 letters: Ava, Moe, Ned, Rob, Ula
  • 4 letters: Cleo, Elmo, Jada, Rhys, Zane
  • 5 letters: Carla, Jesse, Nancy, Ryder, Yosef
  • 6 letters: Edward, Jazmyn, Morgan, Nelson, Ursula
  • 7 letters: Charles, Eleanor, Jeffrey, Malcolm, Rebecca
  • 8 letters: Alphonso, Emmanuel, Mercedes, Mohammad, Randolph
  • 9 letters: Cleveland, Esperanza, Jefferson, Magdalena, Rosabelle
  • 10 letters: Alessandra, Alessandro, Clarabella, Clarabelle, Jacquelynn

…For more onomastic trivia, try this list of baby names that can be typed one-handed on a QWERTY keyboard.