How popular is the baby name Robbie in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Robbie and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Robbie.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Robbie

Number of Babies Named Robbie

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Robbie

Name Quotes for the Weekend #26

halle berry quote about her name

From a short item about Halle Berry in a 1995 issue of Jet:

“My mother was shopping in Halle Brothers in Cleveland,” she recently revealed in the New York Daily News. “She saw the bags and thought, ‘That’s what I’m going to name my child.’ I thought it was the coolest name until I got into this business. No one ever says it right, it’s Halle, like Sally.”

From the NOVA video Zeppelin Terror Attack:

On the day that came to be known as “Zep Sunday,” tens of thousands of relieved Londoners picked over the wreckage for souvenirs.

Overnight, pilot William Leefe Robinson became the most famous man in Britain. Babies, flowers and hats were named after him and he was mobbed wherever he went.

Within a month, the technique he perfected for taking out airships had brought down two more. It was the beginning of the end for the zeppelin.

On September 2, 1916, 21-year-old William Leefe Robinson became the first pilot to shoot down a German Zeppelin over Britain. (Several weeks later, a shot-down Zeppelin inspired a British family to name their newborn Zeppelina.)

From an interview with psychologist and baby name writer Albert Mehrabian:

Looking at the psychological health of subjects using my temperament scales and comparing that with the impression given by their names, I found a correlation showing that individuals with less pleasant names exhibited greater psychopathology. It’s a very weak association, but if I were a parent choosing a name for my child, I wouldn’t take a chance at making that association.

From Under the Spell of a Name by Mikita Brottman in the New York Times (found via Appellation Mountain):

I also know a desperately lonely guy who refused to go on a blind date with a woman he met online (who, he had to admit, seemed an uncannily perfect match) because of her name: Bunny.

“If you like her enough, you’ll get over it,” I told him. “You could call her B.”

“I can’t do it,” he said. “I just can’t imagine my name linked with that of someone named Bunny.”

From a funny post about choosing baby names by Robbie Knox (who has a daughter named Kitty):

[A name should not] be the name of a kids’ TV character. This is where we went wrong. If you pick a name similar to a cartoon that has extensive merchandising contracts, people buy you a lot of stuff. We have more Hello Kitty products in our house than the entire teenage population of Japan put together. We’ll be more careful next time when our son Pikachu is born.

From In Our View: Baby names in Utah newspaper The Spectrum:

Hardcore fans of the 1970’s TV show M*A*S*H* will remember the episode when Major Charles Emerson Winchester (the Third) received a letter from his younger sister. The corpsman, who delivered the letter, referenced her as Hon-o-ree-a to which Winchester pompously responded … “It’s Aun-or-ee-a!” No doubt those high-brow Massachusetts Winchesters had all the best intentions when they named the Major’s little sister, but giving a child a name which must be spelled or repeated several times before new acquaintances “get it” is so unfair. There are lots of reasons kids get bullied, but his or her name — or some derivative of it — should not be a cause for learning self-defense.

Want to see more random quotes about names? Check out the name quotes category.


35 Most Unisex Baby Names in the U.S.

Last month, FlowingData crunched some numbers to come up with the 35 most unisex baby names in the U.S. since 1930. Here’s their list:

  1. Jessie
  2. Marion
  3. Jackie
  4. Alva
  5. Ollie
  6. Jody
  7. Cleo
  8. Kerry
  9. Frankie
  10. Guadalupe
  11. Carey
  12. Tommie
  13. Angel
  14. Hollis
  15. Sammie
  16. Jamie
  17. Kris
  18. Robbie
  19. Tracy
  20. Merrill
  21. Noel
  22. Rene
  23. Johnnie
  24. Ariel
  25. Jan
  26. Devon
  27. Cruz
  28. Michel
  29. Gale
  30. Robin
  31. Dorian
  32. Casey
  33. Dana
  34. Kim**
  35. Shannon

I’m not sure exactly what criteria were used to create the rankings, but it looks like the top unisex names on this list were the top-1,000 names that “stuck around that 50-50 split” the longest from 1930 to 2012.

(In contrast, my unisex baby names page lists any name on the full list to fall within the 25-75 to 75-25 range, but only in the most recent year on record.)

The FlowingData post also mentions that, though the data is pretty noisy, there might be “a mild upward trend” over the years in the number of babies with a unisex name.

**In 1957, Johnny Carson’s 5-year-old son Kim had his name changed to Richard because he’d been having “a little trouble over his name being mistaken for a girl’s.”

Source: The most unisex names in US history

[Update: Changed Michael to Michel, 11/7]

Name Quotes for the Weekend #7

From Proud Dereks: Readers lumbered with unfashionable names:

My great, great aunt was called Golingabeth. I can’t seem to convince my wife who is expecting to even consider this name. Graeme Fryer, Bray, Ireland

And another:

Our daughter’s name skipped more than a few generations. She’s named after the Babylonian goddess of war and sex, Ishtar. My son’s name is even more unusual, he’s called Till, a German boy’s name. German names seem much more unfashionable here than mere ancient gods and goddesses. Liz Jones, Wells, Somerset

And one more:

I bet my name has not featured in the lists at all for a good number of years. It is perhaps softer sounding than Jasper or Rupert but eminently searchable. It sometimes produces a titter in meetings where someone unknowingly uses the word bland rather something more anodyne. I have grown used to the name and it is rather distinctive so I do tend to be remembered. Though my real name is Charles Bland Tomkinson, I have always been called Bland. Bland Tomkinson

From a US News article about the death of former Mouseketeer Bonita Lynn Fields Elder:

Elder always went by the name Lynn, but she adopted the stage name “Bonnie” — a shortened version of her real first name — at the suggestion of the show’s producers because there was already a cast member, a boy, with the first name Lynn, her cousin said.

From the X-Factor’s “Meet Panda Ross” video [1:54 to 2:14]:

Simon Powell: So what’s your name?
Panda Ross: Panda.
Simon: What?
Panda: Panda. Like the bear.
Simon: That’s your real name?
Panda: That’s my real name.
Simon: Why were you called Panda?
Panda: My mom, well, she was kinda, you know, in jail when she had me, and her cellmate was a white lady, she was black, and so, they just kinda came up with the name.

From a Daily Mail article about Robbie Williams:

The Candy singer also spoke about celebrity baby names and how he and wife Ayda Fields chose their daughter’s moniker.

Robbie quipped: ‘We wanted to call her Teddy but that’s bordering on celebrity nonsense and we thought what if she doesn’t go into showbiz and needs a professional name, so Theodora is her professional name and Teddy is the name she goes by at home.’

And another:

The hit-maker revealed how he had once mixed up the name of Gwyneth Paltrow’s daughter, when the actress paid a visit to his house.

He remembered: ‘We were at my house in Los Angeles and the Coldplay boys had been over for a game of football and Gwyneth turned up. I was like, “Gwyneth Paltrow is in my house”, and as she walked towards me I kept saying in my head, “say something to Gwyneth Paltrow, say something to Gwyneth Paltrow” and I said, “Does Melon want some Apple?”‘

From Josh & Julie Korn: Digging for a CURE:

Hassane and Hussein are popular names for twins here in Niger. If you meet a Hassane or a Hussein, chances are they have a twin brother.

From a People article about Drew Barrymore’s recent appearance on Ellen:

Asked why she and her husband Will Kopelman chose Olive, the actress says it came from a book–though not one of baby-names.

“I was reading a book with my husband. I was three months pregnant, and they said, ‘Your baby is the size of an olive.’ And that was it. We never looked back.”

From an MTV article about the moms of Teen Mom 2:

And Kailyn? Well, turns out she was a huge Hanson fan (okay, who wasn’t?), and named Isaac after the eldest brother. “Do you remember, ‘Mmm Bop?'” she pleads to the other, seemingly clueless girls. They may not, but…oh, we remember.

That’s the first time I’ve ever seen/heard someone admit they named their kid after a member of Hanson.

Here are quote lists #1, #2, #3, #4, #5 and #6.

Baby Boy Named After Entire Soccer Team

We talked about a baby named Jenson not long ago, and now here’s a Jensen.

Amanda and Stephen Preston of Lancashire, England, welcomed a son in late January, 2011. He was named Jensen after Brian Jensen, goalkeeper of the Burnley football (a.k.a. soccer) team. But that’s not all! He was named after each of the other players on the team as well.

Stephen said, “We had already decided to call him Jensen as he is Amanda’s favourite player, but we couldn’t decide on a middle name so we thought why not go for the whole team.”

Here are all of the baby’s given names, and the corresponding Burnley players:

Name Players
Jensen
Jay
Alexander
Bikey
Carlisle
Duff
Elliot
Fox
Iwelumo
Marney
Mears
Paterson
Thompson
Wallace
Brian Jensen
Jay Rodriguez
Graham Alexander
Andre Bikey
Clarke Carlisle
Michael Duff
Wade Elliott
Danny Fox
Chris Iwelumo
Dean Marney
Tyrone Mears
Martin Paterson
Steven Thompson
Ross Wallace

If the baby had been a girl, the only difference would have been Briany instead of Jensen for the first name.

Source: Preston: The baby named after all FOURTEEN members of football team

[The article also mentions a baby boy born in 2009 and named Robbie-Blake Moore, “after Robbie Blake’s winning goal against Manchester United in the Premier League.”]

Betting on Celebrity Baby Names – Nicole Kidman & Angelina Jolie

Think you know what Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban will be naming their baby? You can put money on it over at Paddy Power:

Odds
10 to 1
12 to 1
14 to 1
20 to 1
25 to 1
33 to 1
40 to 1
50 to 1
66 to 1
100 to 1
250 to 1
Names
Anthony, Janelle
Nick/Nicholas, Keith
Shannon, Nicole
Robbie/Robert
Jude, Sean, Aoife, Lyle
Edna, Ewan, Beth, Sydney, Russell, Hope, Hugh
Rachel, Nara, Daralis, Brad, Courtney, Dylan
Kevin, Erin, Clyde, Baz, Angelina
Kylie, Virginia, Satine, Perth, London, Holly
Cupid, Jackson, Madonna, Honolulu, Prince, Ireland, Princess
Katie, Suri, Tom, Maverick

And if you think you’ve got the scoop on what Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt will be naming their next baby, you can go make a bet at Bodog:

Odds
5 to 1
9 to 1
10 to 1
11 to 1
12 to 1
13 to 1
15 to 1
20 to 1
30 to 1
Names
Marchelina
Shani
Etta, Gabriel, Sarah, Sari
Salama
Amani, Bradley, Jane
Alvin, Daren
Aaron
William
Jon

Personally, I don’t like the way both betting sites roll two issues — gender and name — into a single question. This forces you to bet on both, and hence you need to get both right to actually win.

Ignoring this sketchiness, though…if you were going to gamble on the baby names above, where would you put your money?