How popular is the baby name Robby in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Robby and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Robby.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Robby

Number of Babies Named Robby

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Robby

How Many Twins Get Matchy-Matchy Names?

In a comment on last week’s twin name post, Erin said she’d “love to see some kind of analysis on what percentage of twins are given names that are/aren’t matchy-matchy.”

I do know of one analysis like this. It’s 50 years old, so it’s not exactly up-to-date, but these were the findings:

  • 79% of twins overall had similar names
    • 90% of identical twins had similar names
    • 75% of fraternal twins had similar names

Name researcher Robert Plank published “Names of Twins” in the journal Names way back in 1964. This study was mentioned by H. Edward Deluzain in the essay “Names and Personal Identity” in 1996:

Robert Plank, who studied names of twins, discovered that the names fit into three patterns and that the names in two of the patterns show unmistakable similarity. The most common pattern, which occurred in 62% of the cases Plank studied, was the use of names that begin with the same letter. This included such names as Richard and Robert (Ricky and Robby), Joseph and Judith (Joey and Judy), Louise and Louisa, as well as such names as Paul and Paula and Patrick and Patricia. The second pattern involved names that had different first letters but where similar in sound, rhythm, or rhyme. Such sets of names as Tracy and Stacy, Billy Joe and Penny Sue accounted for 17% of the sets of names. Finally, Plank found that only 21% of the sets of names were different enough from one another to be considered dissimilar. Identical twins, who are always of the same sex and who look so much alike people have trouble telling them apart, fare worse than fraternal twins in the similarity of their names. For, as Plank found, almost 90% of the identical twins had similar names compared to roughly only 75% of the fraternals.

Have any of you seen more recent research on similar/dissimilar names for twins?

Name Signs – Dotty’s Casino, etc.

Need a photo of a sign that says something like Robbie’s Barber Shop or Sophia’s House of Pancakes?

I know, I know–probably not. :)

But just in case you do one day…

The bizarre-but-awesome Flickr group First-Name Basis Signage Project has got you covered. It’s a collection of business signs featuring given names. Dotty’s Casino, Cicero’s Green Frog Pizza, Rosie’s Rock Yard, Howard’s Donuts, and thousands more.


UPDATE, 1/31/13: I just spotted a article called a New Book Helps You Visualize Your Child’s Name, which is about a new book called It’s a Boy – It’s a Girl, which contains “over 300 hundred pages of names as signs.”

Baby Names from Your Relationship with Your Partner

Could your relationship inspire a great baby name? I bet it could, if you ask yourself the right questions. Here are some to start you off:

How did the two of you meet?

  • Did a mutual acquaintance introduce you? What was that person’s name?
  • Did you meet while taking the same scuba class? What was the name of the instructor?
  • Did you meet while living in the same dorm at college? What was the name of the dorm? (If it’s a surname, what was the forename originally attached to it?)
  • Did you meet doing theater? What character names do you remember from the first production you worked on together?
  • Example: Actors Robby Benson and Karla DeVito named their daughter Lyric because they met while singing on Broadway.
  • Example: John Kipling and Alice Macdonald, future parents of writer Rudyard Kipling, met on the banks of Rudyard Lake in Staffordshire, England.

Think about your firsts.

  • Did you go out to dinner on your first date? What was the name of your waiter?
  • Did you have your first kiss while waiting in the lobby of a particular building? What was the name of the architect who designed the building?
  • What was the first movie you went to see together? What were the names of the lead characters?
  • Did you first say “I love you” to one another while picnicking in the park? What was the name of the park?

Think about other memorable experiences.

  • What’s the name of the street you first lived on together?
  • What’s the name of the coffee shop you used to go to every Friday night when you were dating?
  • Did your relationship ever hit a rough patch? What’s the name of the friend who helped you get through it out and stay together?
  • Have you ever done anything that you’re both really proud of (e.g. scaled a mountain, raised a lot of money for charity)? What names come to mind when you think of these things?
  • When you look through your collection of photographs, ticket stubs, playbills, receipts, brochures, fliers, and other paraphernalia, what names do you see? What other names are you reminded of?
  • Example: Filmmaker Rohan Fernando and his wife Carolle named their son Cohen because, on their second date, they went to see Leonard Cohen.
  • Example: “Late Night” host Jimmy Fallon name his daughter Winnie because he and his wife spent a lot of time (and were engaged) at Lake Winnipesaukee.

Engagement, Marriage, Honeymoon, Anniversaries

  • What’s the name of the person (e.g. pastor, priest, rabbi) who married you?
  • Wedding dresses often have female names in lieu of (or along with) model numbers–did yours?
  • Who sang your first dance song?
  • What’s the name of the hotel you stayed in on your honeymoon?
  • Example: San Francisco mayor Gavin Newsom named his daughter Montana because that’s where he and his wife got married.
  • Example: One of my commenters named her son Boston because she got engaged after running the Boston Marathon.

And now the fun part: What names can you come up with from your own relationship? What’s the story behind each one, and did you use (or do you plan to use) any of the names for your children?