How popular is the baby name Ronald in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Ronald and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Ronald.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Ronald

Number of Babies Named Ronald

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Ronald

Popular Boy Names: Biblical vs. Non-Biblical

How has the ratio of Biblical names to non-Biblical names changed over time (if at all) among the most popular baby names in the U.S.?

This question popped into my head recently, so I thought I’d take a look at the data. We’ll do boy names today and girl names tomorrow.

First, let’s set some parameters. For these posts, “Biblical” names are personal names (belonging to either humans or archangels) mentioned in the Bible, plus all derivatives of these names, plus any other name with a specifically Biblical origin (e.g., Jordan, Sharon, Genesis). The “most popular” names are the top 20, and “over time” is the span of a century.

For boy names, the ratio of Biblical names to non-Biblical names has basically flipped over the last 100 years. Here’s a visual — Biblical names are in the yellow cells, non-Biblical names are in the green cells, and a borderline name (which I counted as non-Biblical) is in the orange cell:

Popular boy names: Biblical vs. non-Biblical, from Nancy's Baby Names.
Popular boy names over time: Biblical (yellow) vs. non-Biblical. Click to enlarge.
  • Biblical names: Adam, Alexander, Andrew, Austin (via Augustus), Benjamin, Daniel, David, Elijah, Ethan, Jack (via John), Jackson (via John), Jacob, James, Jason, John, Jonathan, Joseph, Joshua, Justin (via Justus), Lucas, Mark, Matthew, Michael, Nathan, Nicholas, Noah, Paul, Stephen, Steven, Thomas, Timothy, Zachary
  • Non-Biblical names: Aiden, Albert, Anthony, Arthur, Billy, Brandon, Brian, Charles, Christopher, Dennis, Donald, Dylan, Edward, Eric, Frank, Gary, George, Harold, Harry, Henry, Jayden, Jeffrey, Kenneth, Kevin, Larry, Liam, Logan, Louis, Mason, Raymond, Richard, Robert, Ronald, Ryan, Scott, Tyler, Walter, William
  • Borderline name: Jerry (can be based on the Biblical name Jeremy/Jeremiah or on the non-Biblical names Jerome, Gerald, Gerard)
    • It felt strange putting an overtly Christian name like Christopher in the non-Biblical category, but it doesn’t appear anywhere in the Bible, so…that’s where it goes.

      Here are the year-by-year tallies:

      Year Top 20 names
      given to…
      # Biblical # Non-Biblical
      1914 40% of baby boys 5 (25%) 15 (75%)
      1924 43% of baby boys 6 (30%) 14 (70%)
      1934 43% of baby boys 7 (35%) 13 (65%)
      1944 47% of baby boys 7 (35%) 13 (65%)
      1954 46% of baby boys 11 (55%) 9 (45%)
      1964 42% of baby boys 11 (55%) 9 (45%)
      1974 38% of baby boys 11 (55%) 9 (45%)
      1984 36% of baby boys 14 (70%) 6 (30%)
      1994 27% of baby boys 14 (70%) 6 (30%)
      2004 19% of baby boys 14 (70%) 6 (30%)
      2014 14% of baby boys 14 (70%) 6 (30%)

      But there’s a huge difference between sample sizes of 40% and 14%, so let’s also take a look at the 2014 top 100, which covers 42% of male births.

      By my count, last year’s top 100 boy names were half Biblical, half non-Biblical:

      Biblical names (49) Non-Biblical names (51)
      Noah, Jacob, Ethan, Michael, Alexander, James, Daniel, Elijah, Benjamin, Matthew, Jackson (via John), David, Lucas, Joseph, Andrew, Samuel, Gabriel, Joshua, John, Luke, Isaac, Caleb, Nathan, Jack (via John), Jonathan, Levi, Jaxon (via John), Julian (via Julius), Isaiah, Eli, Aaron, Thomas, Jordan, Jeremiah, Nicholas, Evan, Josiah, Austin (via Augustus), Jace (via Jason), Jason, Jose, Ian, Adam, Zachary, Jaxson (via John), Asher, Nathaniel, Justin (via Justus), Juan Liam, Mason, William, Logan, Aiden, Jayden, Anthony, Carter, Dylan, Christopher, Oliver, Henry, Sebastian, Owen, Ryan, Wyatt, Hunter, Christian, Landon, Charles, Connor, Cameron, Adrian, Gavin, Robert, Brayden, Grayson, Colton, Angel, Dominic, Kevin, Brandon, Tyler, Parker, Ayden, Chase, Hudson, Nolan, Easton, Blake, Cooper, Lincoln, Xavier, Bentley, Kayden, Carson, Brody, Ryder, Leo, Luis, Camden

      (Christian, Angel, Xavier, Dominic…all technically non-Biblical, despite having strong ties to Christianity.)

      50%-50% isn’t quite as extreme as 70%-30%, but it’s still noticeably more Biblical than 1914’s 25%-75%.

      Do any of these results surprise you?

Don Ameche’s Rhyming Children

In yesterday’s post about the name Drene, I mentioned actor/entertainer Don Ameche.

Don, born Dominic Felix Amici in 1908, married his wife Honoré in 1932. They had six children:

  • Dominic
  • Ronald
  • Thomas
  • Lawrence
  • Barbara (adopted)
  • Cornelia (adopted)

The kids were known by nicknames, though, and most of those nicknames were perfect rhymes:

  • Donnie
  • Ronnie
  • Tommie
  • Lonnie
  • Bonnie
  • Connie

What do you think about a sibset with rhyming nicknames: yea or nay? (Does it depend upon the size of the sibset?)

Source: Houseman, Victoria. Made in Heaven: The Marriages and Children of Hollywood Stars. Chicago: Bonus Books, 1991.

Mouseketeer Names – Annette, Dennis, Margene, Ronnie

Annette Funicello, the most popular member of the original Mickey Mouse Club (1955-1959), passed away a couple of days ago.

Seeing her name in the news made me think about the other original Mouseketeers, most of whom were born in the early to mid-1940s (making them teens in the late 1950s). If you’re looking for a baby name reminiscent of sock hops and soda fountains, the first batch of Mouseketeers is not a bad place to start:

  1. Annette Funicello (b. 1942)
  2. Billie Beanblossom (b. 1944)
  3. Bonita “Bonnie” Lynn Fields (b. 1944)
  4. Bonni Lou Kern (b. 1941)
  5. Bronson Scott* (b. 1947)
  6. Charles “Charlie” Laney (b. 1943)
  7. Cheryl Holdridge (b. 1944) – who went on to marry Lance Reventlow
  8. Carl “Cubby” O’Brien (b. 1946)
  9. Dallas Johann (b. 1944)
  10. Darlene Gillespie (b. 1941)
  11. Dennis Day (b. 1942)
  12. Joseph Richard “Dickie” Dodd (b. 1945)
  13. Don Agrati (b. 1944)
  14. Donald “Don” Underhill (b. 1941)
  15. Doreen Tracey (b. 1943)
  16. Eileen Diamond (b. 1943)
  17. John “Johnny” Crawford (b. 1946)
  18. John Joseph “Jay-Jay” Solari (b. 1943)
  19. (John) Lee Johann (b. 1942)
  20. Judy Harriet (b. 1942)
  21. Karen Pendleton (b. 1946)
  22. Larry Larsen (b. 1939)
  23. Linda Hughes (b. 1946)
  24. Leonard “Lonnie” Burr (b. 1943)
  25. (Lowrey) Lynn Ready* (b. 1944)
  26. Margene Storey (b. 1942)
  27. Mark Sutherland (b. 1944)
  28. Mary Espinosa (b. 1945)
  29. Mary Sartori (b. 1943)
  30. Mickey Rooney, Jr. (b. 1945)
  31. Michael “Mike” Smith (b. 1945)
  32. Nancy Abbate (b. 1942)
  33. (William) Paul Petersen (b. 1945)
  34. Robert “Bobby” Burgess (b. 1941)
  35. Ronald “Ronnie” Steiner (b. 1942)
  36. Sharon Baird (b. 1942)
  37. Sharyn “Sherry” Alberoni (b. 1946)
  38. Timothy “Tim” Rooney (b. 1947)
  39. Thomas “Tommy” Cole (b. 1941)

*Bronson Scott was a girl; Lynn Ready was a boy.

Which of the above names are your favorite(s)?

Sources: Girl next door Annette Funicello dies at 70, The Original Mickey Mouse Club Show

The Name Reinhold

Dan Fielding a.k.a. Reinhold
Dan Fielding
If you watched Night Court back in the ’80s and ’90s, the name Reinhold Weege might look familiar to you.

Reinhold Weege was the show’s creator. He passed away several days ago, but his obituary mentions that he liked to poke fun at his unusual name via the show.


One of the most popular Night Court characters was the lecherous prosecutor Dan Fielding (played by John Larroquette). He wasn’t born Dan Fielding, though. His birth name was Reinhold Fielding Elmore. He’d had his name changed “out of embarrassment.”

So where does the name come from, in terms of etymology? Reinhold — and related names like Reynold, Ronald, and Reginald — can be traced back to an Ancient Germanic name created from the words ragin, “advice, decision,” and wald, “ruler.”

Source: Hanks, Patrick, Kate Hardcastle and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of First Names. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

(h/t Charles G Hill of

Soviet Babies Named for Ronald Reagan

In December of 1987, President Ronald Reagan met with Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev in Washington.

According to Soviet news agency TASS, a Moscow couple welcomed twin boys during the summit (on December 8) and named them Ronald and Mikhail for the two leaders.

In May of 1988, there was another Reagan-Gorbachev summit, this time in Moscow.

TASS reported that Latvian parents Romuald and Biruta Saltsevich welcomed a baby boy, their fifth child, during the Moscow summit. They named the baby Ronald in honor of the visiting American president.

Source: “Soviet couple name baby boy Ronald, in honor of president.” Miami News 1 Jun. 1988: 3A.

Wisconsin Family with 22 Children

Fred and Edith Schoville of Wisconsin had their first child in 1926, their last in 1952, and 20 in between. That’s a total of 22 children. All were single births.

Here are the names of the kids, plus as many of the birth years as I could verify.

1. Marjorie, b. 1926
2. Freddie (“Junior”) b. 1926
3. Lola, b. 1928
4. Betty, b. 1928
5. Marlin, b. 1932
6. Phyllis, b. 1933
7. Donna Mae, b. 1934
8. Annabelle, b. 1934
9. Patsy (girl)
10. Larry Lee, b. 1938
11. Janice
12. Sharon
13. Frederick (“Freddie”) b. 1941
14. Susan
15. Ronald (“Ronnie”)
16. Robert, b. 1945
17. Karen
18. Linda Lou, b. 1947
19. Gary
20. Charles, b. 1949
21. Steven, b. 1951
22. Randy, b. 1952

Which girl name is your favorite? How about boy name?


  • “Family Reunion.” Spokane Daily Chronicle 18 Apr. 1950: 7.
  • “Wisconsin Mother of 21 Children Isn’t Frightened by Cost of Living.” Telegraph-Herald 18 Mar. 1951: 1.

Baby’s Name Inspired by Corporate Merger

In March of 1982, shareholders approved the merger of U.S. Steel and Findlay, Ohio-based Marathon Oil. Newspapers at the time called it the “second-largest corporate takeover in history.”

Expectant parents Marilyn Chin and Ronald Yurcak were both working for a New York City investment banking firm involved in the merger. On March 24, about 2 weeks after the merger, they welcomed a baby girl named Jennifer Findlay Yurcak.

“For months, the talk was about Marathon and about Findlay, Ohio,” Ms. Chin said in a telephone interview. “The more I heard the name, the more I liked it. It has a nice ring to it.”

The couple said they would have used Findlay as a middle name regardless of the baby’s gender.


  • “Corporate Merger Gives Baby a Name.” Lakeland Ledger 9 Apr. 1982: 7D.
  • “Baby Named After Merger.” Lodi News-Sentinel 15 Mar. 1982: 10.
  • “Findlay Baby.” Times-News [Hendersonville, NC] 15 Mar. 1982: 2.