How popular is the baby name Ronda in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Ronda and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Ronda.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Ronda

Number of Babies Named Ronda

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Ronda

The Return of Rousey?

ronda rousey, ufc, mma
© 2015 Hans Gutknecht/Los Angeles Daily News
Though I’m talking about the baby name and not the UFC fighter, the two are inextricably linked.

In 2015, California-born mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey was at the peak of her fame. How do I know this? Just look at Google’s 2015 search rankings. She was the most searched-for athlete, the 3rd most searched-for person, and the 5th most searched-for term overall in the U.S.

The same year, the name Rousey debuted in the SSA’s baby name data:

  • 2015: 6 baby girls named Rousey [debut]
  • 2014: unlisted

While 2016 started out pretty well for Rousey (she hosted Saturday Night Live in January, for instance) the year ended with her second UFC defeat, along with talk of her retiring from MMA altogether. Even more telling, Ronda Rousey was nowhere to be found among the top search terms of 2016.

So will her surname be back on the baby name charts in 2016? How about 2017? What do you think?

P.S. Here are some of the other girl names that debuted in 2015.


Huge List of Anagram Baby Names

anagram baby names

Looking for baby names with something in common? Perhaps for a set of twins or triplets? I’ve collected hundreds of anagram baby names for you.

2-Letter Anagram Baby Names

3-Letter Anagram Baby Names

4-Letter Anagram Baby Names

5-Letter Anagram Baby Names

6-Letter Anagram Baby Names

7-Letter Anagram Baby Names

8-Letter Anagram Baby Names

9-Letter Anagram Baby Names

10-Letter Anagram Baby Names

If you like the idea of anagrams but want to avoid sound-alike sets, I recommend anagrams with different numbers of syllables. Pairs like “Etta and Tate” and “Clay and Lacy” are a far more subtle than pairs like “Enzo and Zeno” and “Mary and Myra.”

(Here are some palindromic names from last month.)