How popular is the baby name Rose in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Rose.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Rose


Posts that Mention the Name Rose

Popular Baby Names in Paris, 2019

According to Paris Data, the most popular baby names in Paris, France, in 2019 were Louise and Gabriel.

Here are the city’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2019:

Girl Names

  1. Louise, 223 baby girls
  2. Jeanne, 195
  3. Emma, 180 (tie)
  4. Alice, 180 (tie)
  5. Chloé, 177
  6. Alma, 152
  7. Anna, 142
  8. Charlotte, 140
  9. Joséphine, 133 (tie)
  10. Adèle, 133 (tie)

Boy Names

  1. Gabriel, 371 baby boys
  2. Adam, 292
  3. Arthur, 282
  4. Raphaël, 272
  5. Louis, 271
  6. Mohamed, 213
  7. Victor, 187
  8. Léon, 181
  9. Paul, 180
  10. Isaac, 174 (tie)
  11. Joseph, 174 (tie)

In the girls’ top 10, Alma, Joséphine and Adèle replace Rose, Léa, and Inès. (Notably, Joséphine jumped from 30th place — 97 baby girls — all the way into the top 10.)

In the boys’ top 10, Léon and Isaac/Joseph replace Alexandre and Gaspard.

Finally, here’s a selection of names from elsewhere in the 2019 Paris data (which, like the SSA data, includes all names given to at least five babies per year).

Parisian Girl NamesParisian Boy Names
Apolline (80 girls), Garance (60), Aminata (55), Isaure (40), Castille (37), Ysée (29), Sixtine (17), Athénaïs (15), Prune (14), France (6), Ombeline (6)Octave (79 boys), Balthazar (37), Djibril (30), Aurélien (22), Hippolyte (21), Corentin (10), Matisse (9), Zéphyr (7), Tancrède (7), Enguerrand (6), Kaïss (5)

Source: Liste des prénoms – Paris Data

The Inception of Sway

sway, gone in 60 seconds, movie, character
Angelina Jolie as Sara “Sway” Wayland

The word Sway popped up for the first time in the U.S. baby name data in 2001:

  • 2003: 14 baby girls and 5 baby boys named Sway
  • 2002: 12 baby girls named Sway
  • 2001: 8 baby girls named Sway [debut]
  • 2000: unlisted
  • 1999: unlisted

For a long time I assumed the main influence was MTV personality Sway Calloway. But, while I still think Sway had an influence on male usage, I’ve since discovered a much better explanation for the 2001 debut as a female name.

One of the main characters in the 2000 car heist film Gone in 60 Seconds was mechanic-slash-bartender Sara “Sway” Wayland (played by Angelina Jolie). She was the love interest of protagonist Randall “Memphis” Raines (played by Nicolas Cage), who was tasked with stealing 50 specific, expensive cars inside of 72 hours.

The film didn’t get great reviews, but I do remember appreciating the fact that each of the 50 cars was assigned a feminine code-name:

Mary, Barbara, Lindsey, Laura, Alma, Madeline, Patricia, Carol, Daniela, Stefanie, Erin, Pamela, Olga, Anne, Kate, Vanessa, Denise, Diane, Lisa, Nadine, Angelina, Rose, Susan, Tracey, Rachel, Bernadene, Deborah, Stacey, Josephine, Hillary, Kimberley, Renee, Dorothy, Donna, Samantha, Ellen, Gabriela, Shannon, Jessica, Sharon, Tina, Marsha, Natalie, Virginia, Tanya, Grace, Ashley, Cathy, Lynn, Eleanor

So, how do you feel about the name Sway? If you were having a baby girl, would you be more likely to name her something modern, like Sway, or something traditional, like Sara or Susan?

Sources: Gone in 60 Seconds (2000 film) – Wikipedia, Talk:Gone in 60 Seconds (2000 film) – Wikipedia

Rare Flower Name: Passiflora

passiflora, passion flower,

Yesterday’s post about the name Passion, plus the fact that I happen to love passion flowers (because they are so weirdly elaborate), made me wonder: Has anyone ever been given the first-middle combo “Passion Flower”? How about the name of the genus, passiflora?

Turns out the answer is “yes” to both questions, though I could only find a single trustworthy example of each in the records.

  • A female named Passion Flower Johnson was born in California in 1988.
  • A female named Passiflora Dadge was born in Lancashire, England, in 1896. (Her four older siblings were Lilian, Stephen, Rose and Violet.)

So how did the plant come to be called “passion flower” in the first place? It was named in the 17th century by Spanish Christian missionaries who saw the various components of the bloom as being symbolic of the Passion of Jesus (e.g., the corona filaments represented the crown of thorns).

I also happened to find a Mississippi man named Maypop Stewart on the 1880 U.S. Census. “Maypop” is the common name of a type of passion flower native to the southern U.S. He was an African-American man who’d been born in Alabama in 1820s, so it’s possible that he was a former slave who’d been named by a slaveowner.

Sources: Passiflora – Wikipedia, Passion – Online Etymology Dictionary

P.S. Did you know that the word Passionate has appeared in the SSA’s baby name data before?

2 Filipino Babies Named Covid?

At least two babies in the Philippines may have been named Covid after Covid-19, the acronym for “coronavirus disease 2019.”

Neither name — “Covid Rose” or “Covid Bryant” — has been confirmed yet, but both were among the top Twitter trends in the Philippines last week. (It was said that Covid Bryant’s middle name was inspired by late NBA legend Kobe Bryant.)

Thoughts on “Covid” as a name?

Update: I wrote this post a couple of days ago, and since then a third baby in the Philippines has allegedly gotten a virus-inspired name: Coviduvidapdap. It’s a portmanteau of Covid and “dubi dubi dap dap” [vid] — nonsense words from the lyrics of the novelty song “Beep Beep Beep Ang Sabi Ng Jeep” by Filipino singer Willie Revillame.

Sources: Future ‘quaranteens’? Covid Bryant and Covid Rose trend as Filipino newborns supposedly named after virus (from ABS-CBN — also a name!), From ‘Coronnials’ to ‘quaranteens’: Internet users predict future of kids named after COVID-19

Popular Baby Names in College Station, 2019

According to the government of College Station (in Texas), the most popular baby names in the Texas city in 2019 were Olivia and Aiden.

Here are College Station’s top 3 girl names and top 3 boy names of 2019:

Girl Names

  1. Olivia, 17 baby girls
  2. Emma, 12
  3. Harper, 11

Boy Names

  1. Aiden, 11 baby boys (tie)
  2. Liam, 11 (tie)
  3. Grayson, 10

In the girls’ top 3, Olivia replaces Ava.

The boys’ top 3 is entirely new: Aiden, Liam, and Grayson replace James, Jackson, and Aaron.

The most popular middle names were Grace, Rose, and Marie (for girls) and James, Lee/Leigh, and Michael (for boys).

Some of the interesting first-middle combinations bestowed last year include Alpha Dewdrop, Birdie Scout, Brontayveai Imblessed, Castyn Maverick, Indie River, Klutch Christian, Piston Jayne, Rupert Badlands, Tesla Eden, and Zoiimi My’Life.

In 2018, the top two names in College Station were Emma and James.

Source: Aiden, Olivia CS’s most popular baby names in 2019