How popular is the baby name Sabina in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Sabina and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Sabina.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Sabina

Number of Babies Named Sabina

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Sabina

Name Quotes for the Weekend #30

Mr. Rogers Quote

From a letter written by Mr. Rogers to a fan named Jason in 1987:

You asked me what my middle name is. When you care about people, you want to know more about them. My middle name is McFeely. I was named after my Grandfather McFeely. That’s the name we decided to use for the man who does the deliveries on our television visits.

From “What’s In A Child’s Name” by Rich Cromwell:

Before Aoife, we were never big on meaningful names, on names that represented something. With Greer and Scout, we just went with ones that were right for the moment, oblivious to what serendipity had in store. With Aoife, there was a purpose, a reason. And if when she curses us for it, we have a story to tell her. A story she can tell. She may not immediately appreciate it, but in time she will.

From the about page of blogger ShezCrafti (a.k.a. Jaime):

I was named after Jaime Sommers, The Bionic Woman. True story. My mom was a huge fan and evidently watched a lot of it while pregnant with me. But these days it’s cooler to tell people I spell it like Jaime Lannister.

(The “ShezCrafti” handle comes from the Beastie Boys song “She’s Crafty.”)

From an essay called “Your Kid is a Little Asshole” by Nils Parker:

Most of the little girls were what you’d expect from the affluent suburbs of a major American city. They were cute, thin, predominantly blond, with WASPy names that were so white they were practically invisible.

From an article about Christmas Day babies (same place I found EFC):

Weighing in at 6lb 14oz Kirra Smith was born at 5.09am to the delight of Ella and her mum Claire, 42, and dad Richard, 46, from Neston.

Gazing at her new-born, Claire, a speech and language therapist, said: “Yes. Ella wished for a sister and now she has got one. It was a shock as she was not due until January 6 but this is very special and I will never forget this Christmas.”

Kirra’s unusual name was inspired by Kirra Beach on Australia’s Gold Coast where Richard likes to surf when visiting Claire’s ex-pat mum Triana, 65, who flew over to be at the birth.

From an article called “The newest species of catfish is named after Greedo from Star Wars” by Elahe Izadi:

“We were trying to figure out what the characteristics on it were,” he said. “We share a lab with some arachnologists, and one of them looked at it and said, ‘You know, that looks like that guy from Star Wars.'”

[Jonathan] Armbruster and his colleagues figured out the arachnologist had been referring to Greedo. “As soon as we heard that, we knew what the species would be,” Armbruster said.

From an article called “I’m a Princess and don’t you dare forget it!” by Charlotte Oliver (thank you to Clare of Name News for this one):

At university, I accrued the ear-splitting nickname Choliver, until I simply refused to respond. And while my favourite, Carlotta, worked when I lived in Mexico — mostly with Mojito in hand and salsa on the stereo — I soon realised it caused something of a stink when I returned to the UK. Like a very English John, who replies: “Ay, no papi, call me Juan.”

From an Amy Schumer stand-up act from 2011 (3:18-3:48):

I have this one friend Sabina, though, we’ve been friends forever. She’s gorgeous. She’s a Ford model, she’s dating a professional athlete. And that name Sabina, that’s one of those annoying names you have to be really hot to pull off, right? … You can’t have a bum knee and a lazy eye and be like, “I’m Sabina!”

[….]

If you’re really hot you can be like, I’m Gorgonzola, whut.”

(For the record, I have yet to find a person legally named Gorgonzola.)

For more quotes, check out the name quotes category.


List of Female Names from 1888

female names, 1888

A while ago I found a book called “A Collection of Original Acrostics on Ladies’ Christian Names” that was published in Toronto in 1888.

I won’t post any of the poems, which are all pretty cheesy, but author George J. Howson does include an intriguing selection of names. He notes that he wrote acrostics for “all the most popular feminine christian names of the day, and many more that, while not in common use, are known to exist in actual life.”

Here’s the list:

Abigail
Ada
Adelaide
Adelle
Adeline
Addie
Aggie
Agnes
Alberta
Alecia
Aletha
Alfretta
Alice
Allie
Alma
Almeda
Almira
Alta
Althea
Alvira
Alzina
Amanda
Amelia
Amy
Ann
Anna
Annabell
Annas
Annette
Angelia
Angeline
Annie
Athaliah
Athelia
Augusta
Aura
Avis
Barbara
Beatrice
Bell
Bella
Berdie
Bertha
Bertie
Bessie
Beulah
Blanche
Bridget
Calista
Carrie
Carlotta
Cassie
Catherine
Cecilia
Cela
Celia
Celicia
Celis
Charlotte
Chloe
Christie
Christine
Clara
Clarissa
Cleanthe
Clementina
Constance
Cora
Cordelia
Corinne
Cornelia
Cynthia
Cyrena
Debbie
Delia
Della
Diana
Diantha
Dinah
Dollie
Dora
Dorcas
Dorinda
Dorothy
Edith
Edna
Effie
Ella
Eleanor
Eleanora
Electa
Ellen
Elfie
Eliza
Elma
Elsie
Emma
Emmeline
Emily
Ena
Erma
Estelle
Esther
Ethel
Ethelind
Ettie
Eugenie
Eula
Eunice
Euphemia
Euretta
Eva
Evalina
Eveline
Evelyn
Fannie
Felicia
Flora
Florence
Floss
Frances
Frank
Gay
Georgie
Georgina
Geraldine
Gertie
Gracie
Hagar
Hannah
Harriet
Hattie
Helen
Helena
Henrietta
Hulda
Ida
Irene
Isabel
Isabella
Isadora
Jane
Janet
Janie
Jeannette
Jemima
Jennet
Jennie
Jessie
Jerusha
Joanna
Josephine
Josie
Julia
Kate
Kathleen
Katie
Keziah
Lany
Laura
Leah
Leila
Lena
Lera
Lettie
Levina
Levinia
Libbie
Lida
Lilian
Lillie
Lizzie
Lola
Lora
Lorretta
Lottie
Lou
Louisa
Louise
Lucinda
Lucretia
Lucy
Luella
Lula
Lulu
Lydia
Mabel
Madelaine
Maggie
Malvina
Mamie
Marcella
Margaret
Maria
Marilla
Marion
Mary
Marsena
Martha
Mattie
Maud
Maudie
May
Melinda
Mellissa
Mercy
Mertie
Mildred
Millie
Mina
Minerva
Minnie
Mintha
Miranda
Mollie
Muriel
Myra
Myrtle
Nancy
Naomi
Nellie
Nettie
Nina
Nora
Ollie
Olive
Olivia
Ormanda
Ophelia
Pauline
Pearl
Phoebe
Phyllis
Priscilla
Prudence
Rachel
Rebecca
Rhoda
Robena
Rosa
Rosabel
Rosalie
Rosalind
Rosamond
Rose
Ruby
Ruth
Sabina
Sadie
Sally
Samantha
Sarah
Selina
Sophia
Sophronia
Stella
Susanna
Susie
Sybil
Teresa
Theodocia
Theresa
Tillie
Una
Verna
Victoria
Vida
Viola
Violet
Wilhelmina
Winifred
Zuba

Have any favorites?

Hulda/Huldah is one I like. It’s one of those names that I always see on old New England gravestones but never come across in real life. Wonder when that one will become stylish again.

BTW, has anyone ever seen a good name acrostic? Like, one that’s actually well-written and/or thought-provoking? Because I don’t think I ever have.

Source: A Collection of Original Acrostics on Ladies’ Christian Names by George J. Howson

First Names from King Henry III’s Fine Rolls (1200s)

Henry III of EnglandI’ve got some 13th-century English names for you today!

They come from the fine rolls of King Henry III (1216–1272). The fine rolls were basically financial records. King Henry III wasn’t the first to keep them, but they “expand[ed] considerably in size and content during Henry’s reign.”

The Henry III Fine Rolls Project has translated the fine rolls from Latin to English, if you want to check them out.

Even better for our purposes, though, is this nifty database of given names in the Fine Rolls of Henry III, which shows us the most-mentioned male names and female names in the rolls.

(These lists aren’t the same as the single-year, society-wide baby name popularity lists we’re accustomed to — they cover a wide range of birth years, and a small segment of society — but they do give us a general idea of which names were the most popular during the 1200s.)

Of the 8,423 male names in the fine rolls, these were the most popular:

  1. William (1,217 mentions)
  2. John (669)
  3. Richard (495)
  4. Robert (434)
  5. Henry (376)
  6. Ralph (365)
  7. Thomas (351)
  8. Walter (346)
  9. Roger (337)
  10. Hugh (297)
  11. Geoffrey (261)
  12. Simon (218)
  13. Adam (200)
  14. Nicholas, Peter (180 each)
  15. Gilbert (157)
  16. Alan (110)
  17. Phillip (109)
  18. Reginald (88)
  19. Stephen (83)
  20. Elias (66)
  21. Alexander (65)
  22. Osbert (52)
  23. Eustace (44)
  24. Andrew, Matthew (42 each)
  25. Ranulf (40)

Other names on the men’s list: Hamo, Fulk, Payn, Waleran, Drogo, Engeram, Amfrid, Ratikin, Walkelin, Bonefey, Fulcher, Hasculf, Herlewin, Joldwin, Lefsi, Marmaduke, Orm, Albizium, Cocky, Deulobene, Gwenwynwyn, Markewart.

Of the 1,314 female names in the fine rolls, these were the most popular:

  1. Alice (140 mentions)
  2. Matilda (138)
  3. Agnes (76)
  4. Margaret (69)
  5. Joan (62)
  6. Isabella (60)
  7. Emma (37)
  8. Beatrice (34)
  9. Mabel (33)
  10. Cecilia (32)
  11. Christiana (30)
  12. Hawise (29)
  13. Juliana (27)
  14. Sibyl (25)
  15. Rose (21)
  16. Sarra (16)
  17. Helewise (15)
  18. Avice, Eleanor, Eva, Lucy (14 each)
  19. Leticia (13)
  20. Felicia (12)
  21. Isolda, Margery, Petronilla (11 each)
  22. Ascelina, Edith (10 each)
  23. Phillippa (9)
  24. Amice, Elena, Katherine, Mary, Sabina (8)
  25. Basilia, Muriel (7)

Other names on the women’s list: Albrea, Amabilia, Eustachia, Idonea, Egidia, Millicent, Amphelisa, Avegaya, Barbata, Comitessa, Frethesenta, Wulveva, Alveva, Dervorguilla, Deulecresse, Elizabeth (just 1!), Flandrina, Oriolda.

See any names you like?

Source: The Henry III Fine Rolls by David Carpenter

Baby Name Needed – Name for Emma and Ethan’s Sister

A reader named Andi has two children, Emma and Ethan. She’s now expecting her third, a girl, and she’d like some name suggestions. Here are the details:

  • She does not want another E-name.
  • She’d like something that isn’t very trendy.
  • The baby’s surname will start with an r and have two syllables. (Think Rogers.)

Andi likes the names Adeline (nn Addie), Ava, Chloe, Ellie, Grace, Isabelle, Lauren, Lily, Madeline (nn Maddie) and Victoria. Her husband doesn’t care for any of these names, though.

She also mentions that the names Olivia, Catherine and Julia are off the table.

This is a curious case. Andi would like to avoid trendy names, yet many of the names she likes are very trendy right now. Ava and Chloe are in the top 10. Grace and Lily are in the top 20. Isabelle is similar to #1 name Isabella. Ellie is similar to #14 Ella. Addie and Maddie are also nicknames for #12 Addison and #7 Madison.

So the challenge will be finding a name to go with Emma and Ethan that sounds trendy, but isn’t. Here are some ideas:

Adele
Alice
Althea
Anne
Calla
Camille
Celeste
Celia
Claribel
Diane
Delia
Flora
Helen
Jane
Johanna
Josephine
Josie
Larissa
Lucia
Lydia
Mabel
Marie
Marina
Marla
Naomi
Nelle
Nicole
Opal
Ramona
Risa
Sabina
Sylvia
Talia
Thea
Theresa
Willa

Which of these do you like best with Emma and Ethan? What other names would you suggest to Andi?

Baby Name Needed – Girl Name for Edie’s Sister

A reader named Andrea is expecting her second daughter in May and she’d appreciate some name suggestions. Here’s what she writes:

My husband and I love unusual names that have a little bit of a retro feel (my first daughter is Edie). We’ve been trying to think of something fun and different but still feminine. A few we like: Camilla, Lina, Romi, Gia, Neve and Leigh.

Here are some other names I think they might like:

Beatrix
Bettina
Blythe
Celia
Colette
Cora
Daphne
Della
Fern
Flora
Gemma
Hazel
Iola
Iris
Isla
Jill
Kate
Lida
Livia
Louise
Lucy
Mabel
Martha
Mina
Mona
Nelle
Nessa
Nina
Odette
Pearl
Pia
Rita
Rose
Ruby
Sabina
Sally
Stella
Sylvie
Thea
Tilda
Tess
Wendy
Willa
Winnie

Which of the above do you like best with Edie? What other names would you suggest to Andrea?

Baby Name Needed – Traditional Name for Baby Girl

A reader named Liz is expecting a baby girl and she’d like some help coming up with a name. Here are some details:

  • Liz likes “traditional names that are not the type of name the person wearing it will be teased for,” such as Amalia, Charlotte, Sofia and Louisa/Louise.
  • Liz’s husband like “names that sound cute for a little kid but good for an adult,” such as Grace, Beatrice and Nathalie. (Liz doesn’t care for Beatrice/Beatrix, though.)

So far, Louise/Louisa is the only name both Liz and her husband can agree on.

Here are some other names that I thought might work:

Adele
Alice
Althea
Caroline
Celia
Claire
Clarice
Coralie
Emmeline
Genevieve
Felice
Gillian
Greta
Helena
Irene
Isabelle
Johanna
Josephine
Lavinia
Leona
Lucy
Lydia
Madeleine
Margaret
Mary
Naomi
Nicole
Pauline
Patrice
Philippa
Rosalie
Sabina
Susannah
Sylvia
Thea
Theresa

No name is immune to teasing, but I did bump Harriet, which is dangerously close to “hairy.”

What other names would you suggest to Liz?

Baby Name Needed – Latin or Italian Name for Baby #1

A reader named Claudia is expecting her first baby (gender unknown). She’s looking for a Latin or Italian baby name.

She mentions that her middle name is Elisabetta, the baby’s father is named Simon Edmond, and the baby’s surname will be a 2-syllable D-name similar to Downie.

Here are some names that I think might work:

Adriana
Antonia
Augusta
Aurelia
Camilla
Clementina
Cecilia
Daria
Emilia
Eugenia
Fabia/Fabiana/Fabiola
Felicia
Frances/Francesca
Flora/Floriana
Julia
Isidora
Laura
Livia/Liviana
Lorenza
Lucia/Luciana
Marcella
Marina
Martina
Nunzia
Octavia/Ottavia
Paula/Paola
Philippa/Filippa
Piera/Pietra
Renata
Romana
Sabina
Sebastiana
Silvia/Silvana
Valentina
Victoria/Vittoria
Vincenza
Adrian
Antonio/Antony
Augusto
Aurelio
Camillo
Clemente
Cecil
Dario
Emilio/Emil
Eugene/Eugenio
Fabian/Fabiano
Felix
Francis/Francesco
Florian/Floriano
Julius/Julian
Isidore/Isidoro
Lauro
Livio
Lorenzo/Laurence
Lucian/Luciano
Marcello
Marino
Martin/Martino
Nunzio
Octavian/Ottavio
Paul/Paolo
Philip/Filippo
Piero/Pietro
Renato
Roman/Romano
Sabino
Sebastian/Sebastiano
Silvio/Silvano
Valentino/Valentine
Victor/Vittorio
Vincent/Vincenzo

Which of the above do you like best?

What other Latin and Italian names would you suggest to Claudia?