How popular is the baby name Saddam in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Saddam and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Saddam.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Saddam

Number of Babies Named Saddam

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Saddam

The Baby Name Nayirah

nayirah, 1990, testimony

In October of 1990, two months after Saddam Hussein’s Iraqi forces invaded Kuwait, a 15-year-old Kuwaiti girl named Nayirah testified in front of the U.S. Congressional Human Rights Caucus. She said she’d seen Iraqi soldiers taking Kuwaiti babies out of incubators and leaving them to die.

Her testimony helped sway public opinion in favor of the Gulf War.

But in early 1992, her testimony was called into question. New York Times writer John MacArthur revealed that Nayirah was actually the daughter of the Kuwaiti Ambassador to the United States. Her appearance had been arranged by a U.S. public relations firm and sponsored by a Kuwaiti organization pushing for military intervention. Most importantly, the claims she made could not be corroborated:

Saddam Hussein committed plenty of atrocities, but not, apparently, this one. The teenager’s accusation, at first verified by Amnesty International, was later refuted by that group as well as by other independent human rights monitors.

And amid this controversy in 1992, we see the baby name Nayirah appear for the very first time in the U.S. baby name data:

  • 1993: unlisted
  • 1992: 13 baby girls named Nayirah [debut]
  • 1991: unlisted

The name, which means “luminous” in Arabic, dropped out of the data the next year. It remained a one-hit wonder until reappearing just recently, in 2015.

Sources:


Iraqi Baby Names, During and After Saddam

Baghdad, April, 2003
Baghdad, April, 2003
When the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq began in March of 2003, tens of thousands of Kurds in northern Iraq fled from their cities and villages and took shelter in the hills.

One of these displaced Kurdish families included a boy named Awara, which means “refugee.” His older brother said Awara’s name would be changed to Azad, or “freedom,” once it was safe for the family to return to their home village.

By April, Saddam Hussein was out of power.

And along with the change in regime came a change in baby naming trends. The name “Saddam” and the names of Saddam Hussein’s children (e.g., Udai, Kusai, Rajad, Halla), which had been trendy up to that point, quickly fell out of favor. An employee of Iraq’s National Registry in Baghdad said in late 2003, “We haven’t had even one Saddam since the fall of the regime on April 9th.”

Instead, Iraqi parents started opting for other namesakes. The director of the National Registry mentioned that more than 20 babies had been named for religious leader (and Hussein enemy) Ayatollah Mohammad Baqir al-Hakim after he was assassinated in August, for example.

I couldn’t find any follow-up articles about Awara’s family, though, so I don’t know if they ever made it back to their village, or whether Awara’s name was finally changed from “refugee” to “freedom.”

Sources:

Kuwaiti Baby Girl Named Kuwait

In early 1991, a Malaysian newspaper ran a photo of an exiled Kuwaiti woman in Bahrain holding a baby girl. According to the caption, the baby was named “Kuwait.”

kuwaiti baby named kuwait, 1991

The photo was taken at a rally for Kuwait National Day (Feb. 25) — days before Iraqi forces (under Saddam Hussein) were driven out of Kuwait.

Source: “Call for army of occupation.” New Straits Times [Malaysia] 27 Feb. 1991: 10.
Image: © New Straits Times

The U.S. Babies Named Saddam

saddam hussain, 1980sSaddam Hussein served as the leader of Iraq from the mid-1970s until the early 2000s.

In August of 1990, he invaded Kuwait and set off the Persian Gulf War. (Years later, when asked why he invaded Kuwait, one of his answers was: “When I get something into my head I act. That’s just the way I am.”)

In early 1991, the a U.S.-led allied coalition attacked Iraq, mainly from the air (Operation Desert Storm). By late February, the Iraqis were finally driven out of Kuwait.

Saddam Hussein was in the U.S. news enough in the early 1990s that the name Saddam appeared in the U.S. baby name data for three years in a row:

  • 1993: unlisted
  • 1992: 5 baby boys named Saddam
  • 1991: 10 baby boys named Saddam
  • 1990: 15 baby boys named Saddam [debut]
    • 6 born in California
  • 1989: unlisted

The name Saddam means “one who confronts” in Arabic. In 2007, The Economist specified that the “ungainly” name was “a conjugate of the Arabic words for “shock” and “collision.””

Saddam Hussein’s full name at birth was Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti. “Hussein” was his father’s name, “Abd al-Majid” was his grandfather’s name, and “al-Tikriti” refers to the town of Tikrit, where he was born. He later abolished regional surnames, possibly to “obscure the number of members of his inner circle who were relatives from Takrit.”

Sources:

China Bans Muslim Baby Names Among Uyghurs

Authorities in China’s Hotan prefecture (which is part of the far west Xinjiang Autonomous Region) have recently banned 22 specific Muslim baby names in “an apparent bid to discourage extremism among the region’s Uyghur residents.”

In fact, Beijing has long been restricting the rights of the mostly-Muslim, Turkic-speaking Uyghurs, which make up the largest ethnic group in Xinjiang (45% of the population).

And the name-ban doesn’t just apply to babies. It also applies to young children who already have these names. Uyghurs in the region have told reporters that “authorities were forbidding children whose parents did not change their names from attending kindergarten and elementary school.”

Here are the 22 banned names (15 male, 7 female):

Male names Female names
Abdul’aziz
Arafat
Asadulla
Bin Laden
Guldulla
Hussein
Mujahid
Mujahidulla
Nesrulla
Pakhirdin
Saddam
Seyfiddin
Seyfulla
Shemshiddin
Zikrulla
Aishe
Amanet
Fatima
Khadicha
Mukhlise
Munise
Muslime

According to Ilshat Hesen, vice president of the Uyghur American Association in Washington, D.C., the name ban is a “violation of human rights, and an example of Chinese authorities’ extreme assimilation policy for Muslim Uyghurs.”

Sources: Chinese Authorities Ban Muslim Names Among Uyghurs in Hoten (found via Clare’s Name News), Xinjiang territory Profile – Overview – BBC

[Related: Morocco Bans Berber (Amazigh) Baby Names]

Brazilian Baby Names

The LA Times published an interesting article on Brazilian baby names several years ago (1999). Here are some highlights:

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Brazilian parents who like creative spellings tend to gravitate toward the letters K, W and Y because — at the time the article was written — these letters were not technically part of Brazilian Portuguese.

[In 2009, Brazil enacted spelling reforms that officially added K, W and Y to the alphabet. I’m not sure if this has made them any less desirable for baby names.]

Examples of creative spellings: Tayane (Diana), Kerolyne (Carolina).

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Sometimes, parents choose names inspired by Jogo do Bicho (“the animal game” or “the animal lottery”). This is “a kind of urban numbers game based on superstitions that imbue animals and dates with good luck.”

Example of an animal lottery name: Antonio Treze de Junio de Mil Novecentos e Dezesette (June 13, 1917).

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There are distinct class differences when it comes to naming:

  • In Rio’s favelas (slums), “Edson, Robson, Anderson and Washington are favorite first names […] partly because of the percussive “on” sound and partly because American-sounding names are seen as cool and classy.”
  • Many lower-middle-class parents go for more elaborate names. The Rio registrar explaining these class differences said that, “[b]y seeking status, some cross the line into silliness.” He gave examples like Siddartha, Michael Jackson, Concetta Trombetta Diletta and Marafona (synonym for prostitute).
  • Many wealthy and upwardly mobile parents stick to simple, classic names.

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“Brazilian law forbids names that could expose children to ridicule,” but the law is rarely enforced. For instance, the following made it through…

  • Antonio Morrendo das Dores (Dying of Pain)
  • Barrigudinha (Little-Bellied Girl)
  • Ben Hur
  • Colapso Cardiaco (Cardiac Collapse)
  • D’Artagnan
  • Flavio Cavalcanti Rei da Televisao (King of Television)
  • Nausea
  • Nostradamus
  • Onurb (flip of surname, Bruno)
  • Onurd (brother of Onurb, above)
  • Saddam Hussein
  • Skylab
  • Tchaikovsky Johannsen Adler Pryce Jackman Faier Ludwin Zolman Hunter Lins (goes by “Tchai”)
  • Waterloo
  • Welfare (He said he was named after his father. “My grandfather’s name was Moacir, which in the Tupi Guarani indigenous language means Bad Omen. So he named my father Welfare, because it meant well-being, which was the opposite. And there was a famous English soccer player in Sao Paulo named Harry Welfare.”)
  • Xerox

Do you know anyone from Brazil with an interesting name or name story?

Sources:

Chinese Baby Named After Saddam and SARS

A baby boy born in Wuhan, China, on 20 March 2003 was named Saddam Deng Sars. He was born on the day the Iraq war broke out, hence Saddam, and around the time SARS was spreading across China. Deng is the family name.

At the time of the news reports, the parents were considering using an alternative name for the official records because weren’t sure whether the Chinese government would accept the name Saddam Deng Sars. (I haven’t seen any updates to this story, so I’m not sure what the outcome was.)

And now your mission, should you decide to accept it: look up what was going on in the world around the time you were born. Re-name yourself according to one of the headlines and leave a comment with your new name. (The year-by-year Wikipedia pages should be helpful. Here’s 1950, for example.)

Sources: Chinese couple name their baby son Saddam SARS, Baby Boy Named After Saddam And SARS