How popular is the baby name Sangak in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Sangak and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Sangak.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Sangak

Number of Babies Named Sangak

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Sangak

Name Quotes for the Weekend #31

Saint Hubbins? "He was the patron saint of quality footwear."

From the movie This is Spinal Tap, Marty DiBergi interviewing David St. Hubbins:

Marty: David St. Hubbins…I must admit I’ve never heard anybody with that name.
David: It’s an unusual name. Well, he was an unusual saint. He’s not a very well known saint.
Marty: Oh, there actually is, uh, there was a Saint Hubbins?
David: That’s right, yes.
Marty: What was he the saint of?
David: He was the patron saint of quality footwear.

Here’s an audio clip:

From “Tajiks weigh ban on ‘bad names’” (Turkish Weekly) which I found while researching names in Tajikistan:

Among older generations, it is not uncommon in Tajikistan to see first names like Khoshok (Fodder), Sangak (Small Stone), Istad (Should Stay), or Pocho (Son-in-Law.)

The reasoning behind the unusual eponyms can be attributed to the superstition that giving a child an unflattering name will make them less desirable, and thus prevent God from taking them away.

[Names like these are often described as “apotropaic,” which is based on the Greek word apotropaios, which means “turning away (evil).”]

From “Keeping the data trackers honest” (Washington Post) by columnist Catherine Rampell:

Meinrath says he wastes a lot of time each month trying to correct faulty automated interpretations about him. He’s a man named Sascha, after all, and corporations irksomely address him as “Mrs.” a lot.

From “Transportation” (Full Grown People) by Wendy Wisner:

The little girl never made it to America.

My grandmother didn’t know how she died. And I was too shocked to ask.

“They named me Nachama, which means comfort, because I was her replacement,” she said.

But no one ever called her that. Her name was Emma.

Vogue editor Anna Wintour (in the February 2011 issue) writing about Tucson-born model Arizona Muse:

When I look at Arizona, I see shadows of Linda Evangelista and Natalia Vodianova, but most of all I see her, a gorgeous, smart, grown-up. And how could anyone resist someone with that name?

From an interview with musician Zella Day (Huffington Post) by Michael Bialas:

What’s the inside story behind your name?

ZD: Zella is from the 1840s. My parents got married in Jerome, Arizona. And when they were getting married, they were looking for baby names. And there was a book of the town’s history in Jerome, and they were scouting locations for the wedding. And they just walked into a museum and they were looking through this book. And one of the main coal miner’s wives was named Zella — 1842. There’s actually a song on the record called “Jerome.” That’s about the ghostly woman behind my name.

From “Destiny” at the blog Futility Closet:

The pickle industry’s “man of the year” in 1948 was named Dill L. Pickle.

I can’t think of anything to say about this.