How popular is the baby name Scarlet in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Scarlet and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Scarlet.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Scarlet

Number of Babies Named Scarlet

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Scarlet

Ohio State Fans Have Baby Girl Named Scarlet Gray

Earlier this year, on January 12, the Ohio State Buckeyes beat the Oregon Ducks to win “the first national title in college football’s playoff era.”

Twenty days later, a baby girl born into the Victory family in Akron was named Scarlet Gray Victory.

Parents Andrew and Bianchi Victory say family and friends call the name “genius.”

Baby Scarlet is the third child in the Victory family, the older two being 20-month-old twins William and Georgia.

(A surprising number of Ohio State University fans have named their kids “Scarlet,” “Gray,” and “Scarlet Gray” after the school colors, but this is the first time I’ve seen “Scarlet Gray” paired with the surname “Victory,” so I figured this one deserved a post.)

Sources: Bob Dyer: Baby is OSU fan for life — or else, Ohio State shuts down Oregon offense, wins title


Names With the Word “Car”

If you’re looking for a car name — or you’re a car-lover looking for a baby name — here’s a logical list for you: names that contain the word “car.”

  • Cara, Carra
  • Caramia
  • Cardea
  • Caren, Carin, Caron, Caryn, Karen
  • Carey, Cari, Carie, Carrie, Carrie, Cary
  • Caridad
  • Carina
  • Carissa, Carisa
  • Carl
  • Carla
  • Carleen, Carlene
  • Carlee, Carleigh, Carley, Carli, Carlie, Carly
  • Carlissa, Carlisa
  • Carlisle, Carlyle
  • Carlo
  • Carlos
  • Carlota, Carlotta
  • Carlton, Carleton
  • Carlyn, Carlynn
  • Carmel, Carmela, Carmella, Carmelo, Carmello
  • Carmen
  • Carmine
  • Carol, Carole, Carrol, Carroll, Caryl
  • Carolann
  • Carolee
  • Carolina
  • Caroline, Carolyne
  • Carolyn, Carolynn
  • Carsen, Carson
  • Carsten
  • Carter
  • Carver
  • Charisma, Carisma
  • Encarnacion
  • Giancarlo
  • Karma, Carma
  • Macario, Macarius, Macaria
  • MacArthur
  • Oscar
  • Ricardo, Ricarda
  • Scarlett, Scarlet
  • Toccara

Want to see more names for cars?

The Baby Name Scarlett

The baby name Scarlett is within spitting distance of the top 100, thanks in large part to actress Scarlett Johansson.

What put it on the map originally, though, was Margaret Mitchell’s novel Gone with the Wind (1936).

Did you know that Katie Scarlett O’Hara was nearly named Pansy? It’s true. Scarlett might never have become a baby name at all had Margaret Mitchell not decided, months after her book was accepted for publication, to change the character’s name from Pansy to Scarlett. She explained:

The name Scarlett was chosen six months after my book was sold….I submitted nearly a hundred names to my publishers and they chose Scarlett,–I may add it was my choice too.

Other names under consideration were Robin, Kells, Storm and Angel.

What made her settle on Scarlett?

As to why I chose the name of Scarlett — first, because I came across the name of Katie Scarlett so often in Irish literature and so I made it Gerald’s Mother’s maiden name. Second, while I of course knew of the Scarlett family on our Georgia Coast, I could find no record of any family named Scarlett in Clayton County between the years 1859 and 1873.

The surname originally denoted a maker or seller of a bright (often red-colored) woollen cloth called scarlet.

How many babies were named Scarlett following the book’s publication?

  • 1936 – (unlisted; fewer than 5)
  • 1937 – 7 baby girls named Scarlett
  • 1938 – 6 baby girls named Scarlett
  • 1939 – 7 baby girls named Scarlett (6 Scarlet)

Of course, the film version of Gone with the Wind, released at the very end of 1939, is what really gave the name a boost:

  • 1940 – 59 named Scarlett (16 Scarlet, 8 Scarlette)
  • 1941 – 76 named Scarlett (21 Scarlet, 12 Scarlette)
  • 1942 – 76 named Scarlett (25 Scarlet, 12 Scarlette)
  • 1943 – 68 named Scarlett (29 Scarlet, 11 Scarlette)
  • 1944 – 45 named Scarlett (15 Scarlet, 5 Scarlette)
  • 1945 – 34 named Scarlett (16 Scarlet, 6 Scarlette)

The name slowly picked up steam over the following decades and, by the end of the century, several hundred baby girls were being named Scarlett every year.

When Scarlett Johansson came on the scene in the early 2000s, usage of the name and its variants (and the number of variants) increased at a much faster rate:

  • 2000 – 227 Scarlett, 100 Scarlet, 14 Scarlette, 8 Scarleth
  • 2001 – 236 Scarlett, 114 Scarlet, 31 Scarlette, 6 Scarleth
  • 2002 – 290 Scarlett, 165 Scarlet, 25 Scarlette, 12 Scarleth, 10 Escarlet
  • 2003 – 326 Scarlett, 169 Scarlet, 22 Scarlette, 15 Scarleth, 5 Escarlet
  • 2004 – 538 Scarlett, 158 Scarlet, 41 Scarlette, 10 Scarleth, 6 Escarlet
  • 2005 – 732 Scarlett, 213 Scarlet, 49 Scarlette, 13 Scarleth, 5 Escarleth
  • 2006 – 1,116 Scarlett, 318 Scarlet, 76 Scarlette, 21 Scarleth, 7 Escarlet
  • 2007 – 1,581 Scarlett, 403 Scarlet, 109 Scarlette, 18 Scarleth, 6 Escarlet
  • 2008 – 1,619 Scarlett, 474 Scarlet, 110 Scarlette, 20 Scarleth, 5 Escarlet
  • 2009 – 1,919 Scarlett, 494 Scarlet, 114 Scarlette, 31 Scarleth
  • 2010 – 2,700 Scarlett, 757 Scarlet, 203 Scarlette, 27 Scarleth, 10 Escarlet, 5 Escarleth, 5 Escarlett

Do you think any of the other names Mitchell considered — Pansy, Robin, Kells, Storm, Angel — would have made a better character name? Do you think any of them could have caught on as a baby name the way Scarlett did?

Sources:

Other Gone with the Wind posts: Gone With & Wind, Tara, Suellen, Careen, Melanie

Baby Name Needed for Little Sister

One of my readers is looking for some name suggestions. She writes:

I’m in need of a girl name, a stronger name to go with a flowy last name. 3 older brothers are Charlie, Zack, and Andrew. Would like the name to have ‘a’ sound in the first syllable to follow brothers, also have a different initial. So far have thought of Paige, Megan, Sadie, Grace, but not sold on any of them.

The flowy surname has 4-syllables, starts with Van- and ends with -a.

Here are some names that I think could work:

Beatrix
Daisy
Danielle/Danny
Daphne
Frances/Frankie
Hazel
Jamie
Jane
Katie/Kate
Lauren
Margaret/Maggie
Marie
Marion
Marnie
Rachel
Sage
Sally
Scarlet
Shannon
Tamsin

What other girl names would you suggest?

Baby Name Stories at Appellation Mountain

Abby over at Appellation Mountain began posting her readers’ baby name stories just a few weeks ago and already has a very cool collection going:

If you have a baby name story to share, get in touch with Abby!

Volkswagen-Obsessed Man Gives Baby Initials VW

Chris Redford of Eastbourne is a Volkswagen junkie. He owns (and has only ever owned) VWs. He decorates his home with VW merchandise and memorabilia. He sports about 70 Volkswagen tattoos.

His daughter, born in 2008, is named Scarlet Victoria Willow. That’s right–middle initials V.W.

Given the extent of this man’s obsession, I’m surprised (but pleased!) that the VW-connection isn’t more overt.

I do think “Scarlet Redford” is a bit much, but that’s a different issue entirely.

Sources: Baby Named After Father’s Car (video), Redfords Eleven, Volkswagen fan Chris has beetles on his back

(Want to see other car names?)

Don’t Commit to a Name Pattern Until You Read These 3 Tips

Humans love patterns. Just look last year’s list of popular twin names:

Jacob & Joshua
Daniel & David
Jayden & Jordan
Ethan & Evan
Taylor & Tyler
Gabriella & Isabella
Isaac & Isaiah
Madison & Morgan
Elijah & Isaiah
Ella & Emma

Eight pairs start with the same letter. Seven have the same rhythm. Another seven end with the same letter (and many of these nearly rhyme).

For twins and other multiples, sticking with a name pattern is easy. You know the number of children and their genders ahead of time.

But what if you want a name pattern for an entire sibling set? That can make things tricky. You don’t know how many children you’ll have, or what their genders will be. You also don’t know how your tastes may change over time.

If you’re thinking about a name pattern to cover all of your kids, here are three pieces of advice to consider before you begin:

Don’t lock yourself into something limiting.
Let’s say you like flowers. You have a daughter and you name her Lily. You have another daughter and name her Rose. Then another, Jasmine. And then a fourth, but…you don’t like any other flower names. Iris? Too old. Poppy? Too young. Zinnia? Too weird. Amaryllis will never be spelled correctly. And Daisy is the golden retriever down the street.

Or, let’s say you have a son named Alexander. Then you have another boy, and you decide to name him Xavier so they both have that X in common. Then baby #3–a little girl–comes along. Well, you can’t do Alexis–that’s too close to Alexander. You won’t go near Maxine because you fear maxi pad jokes. Roxanne reminds you too much of that song. Xena reminds you too much of that show. And Beatrix makes you think of rabbits.

When you play chess, you have to think ahead several moves. Look at sibling name patterns the same way. Think ahead as many kids as possible. If you can think of 10 or more usable names that fit the pattern, it’s probably a safe pattern. If you can’t, the pattern may be too limiting to be sustainable.

Consider the pros and cons of visibility.
Have you heard of the Duggars? They have nearly 20 kids, and all of those kids have a J-name. This type of name pattern is one of the easiest to spot. (Especially in large families.)

But name patterns don’t have to be obvious. Let’s say your children will have a whole bunch of aunts and uncles you’d like to honor with baby names. You make a list of their names and simply pick from this list as you have children. In this case, the pattern (aunt and uncle names) is so subtle that it’s basically a family secret.

Here are some example name patterns, ranging from blatant to barely there:

Very conspicuous: First letters (Lou, Leah, Len, Lila)
Rhyme (Aiden, Hayden, Kaeden, Graydon)
Like-sounds (Meredith, Heath, Edith, Griffith)
Theme (Indigo, Scarlet, Tawny, Cyan)
Kinda conspicuous: Alphabetical (Alfred, Bea, Chester, Diana)
Rhythm (Augustus, Miranda, Dakota, Lorenzo)
Source (Juliet, Yorick, Orlando, Cordelia)
Origin (Duncan, Angus, Una, Lachlan)
Inconspicuous: Number of letters (Jason, Frank, Kelly, Alexa)
Spread-out alphabetical (Brian, Elaine, Laura, Paul)
Letter in common (Abigail, Sebastian, Tobias, Isabella)
Chain [last letters into first letters] (Michael, Lauren, Nora, Andrew)

How can you test the visibility of a particular pattern? Make a list of names that fit the pattern. Pick two at random and give them to a friend. Ask that friend what the two names have in common. Did she get it on the first try? Was she unable to guess at all? That should give you a good idea about where the pattern would fall on the spectrum.

Avoid sets of names that have an endpoint.
Your first son is Luke. The next is Sky. The next is Walker. And then…surprise! Son #4. Now what–Anakin? Darth? Chewbacca?

If you start off with a discrete set of names, the universe will laugh at you and you will either:

  • not have enough kids, or
  • have too many kids

to match the number of names in the set. Murphy’s Law in action. So don’t tempt fate–stick with an open-ended theme that could end at two names or continue to ten.

What other suggestions would you give to parents considering name patterns?

Source: SSA