How popular is the baby name Sergey in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Sergey and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Sergey.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Sergey

Number of Babies Named Sergey

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Sergey

Baby Named Etruria for Ocean Liner

Ocean liner Etruria, Cunard

That recent post about Altruria reminded me of a similar-sounding name: Etruria.

In early January, 1907, the Cunard ocean liner RMS Etruria encountered rough seas while crossing the Atlantic. Two of the crewmembers were killed, several others were injured, and passengers were forced to wait out the storm below deck.

During that time, a baby girl was born in steerage to Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Goldstein. Her name? Etruria Rachel Goldstein.

And records reveal that the ship had at least one other namesake: Thomas Etruria Walter, born at sea aboard the Etruria in November of 1887.

The ship was in service from 1885 to 1908. It was named after the ancient civilization that lived in what is today central Italy. The earliest inhabitants of Etruria (that we know of) spoke Etruscan — the presumed origin of a handful of modern baby names including Anthony/Antonio, Camille/Camilla, Horatio, Ignatius, Lavinia, Minerva, and Sergey/Sergio.

Source: “Seaman Killed as Waves Swept Decks of Ocean Liner.” Daily True American [Trenton, NJ] 7 Jan. 1907: 1.


Name Quotes #42 – Tucker, Tess, Shea

tucker, life, 1952

From the cover description of the June 2, 1952, issue of LIFE:

The birthday guest all done up for a party on this week’s cover is Second-Grader Tucker Burns, 7, of New York City.

(A female Tucker born in the mid-1940s? Interesting…)

From “10 facts about Tess of the d’Urbervilles” (pdf) at The Times:

Tess didn’t start out as Tess. Hardy often changed names when he was writing, and he tried out Love, Cis and Sue, using Woodrow as a surname, narrowing the name down to Rose-Mary Troublefield or Tess Woodrow before finally settling on Tess Durbeyfield.

From “Naming a Baby (or 2) When You’re Over 40” by Joslyn McIntyre at Nameberry.com:

But I’m now far too practical for whimsical names. I want to spare my kids the time wasted spelling their name slowly over the phone and correcting its pronunciation millions of times. So out the window went some of the iconoclastic names I loved, but which seemed difficult, along with two names I adored but couldn’t figure out how to spell in a way that would make their pronunciation obvious: CARE-iss and k’r-IN.

From “Why everyone started naming their kids Madison instead of Jennifer” by Meeri Kim in the Washington Post:

While some believed a central institution or figure had to be behind a skyrocketing trend — say, Kim Kardashian or Vogue magazine — researchers have discovered through a new Web-based experiment that doesn’t have to be the case. In fact, the study suggests that populations can come to a consensus about what’s cool and what’s not in a rapid, yet utterly spontaneous way.

From “Name change proves a mysterious and outdated process” by Molly Snyder at OnMilwaukee.com:

The process to change your name is surprisingly lengthy, pricey and arguably outdated. People fill out forms, pay a $168 filing fee (there is also a fee to obtain a new birth certificate once the name is legally granted), get assigned to a judge, schedule a hearing date with the court and take out a statement in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel or the Daily Reporter three weeks in a row declaring intent of name change.

News websites are not approved for legal name change declaration, but this does not mean they couldn’t be someday, according to Milwaukee County Clerk of Circuit Court John Barrett.

“The process is very old and it hasn’t been changed in a long time, but that’s not to say it couldn’t be,” says Barrett. “The Wisconsin legislature decides that. Someone would have to have an interest in that change and take the time to make the argument that we’re in a changing world and publications shouldn’t be limited to print.”

From “The latest trend in startup names? Regular old human names” (Dec. 2014) by Erin Griffith in Fortune:

If you work in startups, there’s a good chance you know Oscar. And Alfred. Benny, too. And don’t forget Lulu and Clara. These aren’t the prominent Silicon Valley people that techies know by first name (although those exist—think Marissa, Satya, Larry and Sergey, Zuck). Rather, Oscar, Alfred, Benny, Lulu and Clara are companies. The latest trend in startup names is regular old human names.

From “A teacher mispronouncing a student’s name can have a lasting impact” by Corey Mitchell at PBS.org:

For students, especially the children of immigrants or those who are English-language learners, a teacher who knows their name and can pronounce it correctly signals respect and marks a critical step in helping them adjust to school.

But for many ELLs, a mispronounced name is often the first of many slights they experience in classrooms; they’re already unlikely to see educators who are like them, teachers who speak their language, or a curriculum that reflects their culture.

“If they’re encountering teachers who are not taking the time to learn their name or don’t validate who they are, it starts to create this wall,” said Rita (‘ree-the’) Kohli, an assistant professor in the graduate school of education at the University of California, Riverside.

It can also hinder academic progress.

From the NPS biography of John Quincy Adams (1767-1848):

Born on July 11, 1767 in Braintree, Massachusetts, he was the son of two fervent revolutionary patriots, John and Abigail Adams, whose ancestors had lived in New England for five generations. Abigail gave birth to her son two days before her prominent grandfather, Colonel John Quincy, died so the boy was named John Quincy Adams in his honor.

(Quincy, Massachusetts, was also named after Colonel John Quincy.)

And finally, from “How Many Mets Fans Name Their Babies ‘Shea’?” by Andrew Beaton in the Wall Street Journal:

You’re not a real Mets fan unless you name your kid Shea.

For more quotes, check out the name quotes category.

Most Popular Baby Names in Armenia, 2012

The most popular baby names in Armenia were announced way back in February, then updated in May. (The numbers below are from the more recent press release.)

According to the National Statistical Service, the country’s top names were Davit for boys and Nare for girls.

Here are Armenia’s top 48 girl names and top 48 boy names of 2012:

Baby Girl Names Baby Boy Names
1. Nare, 967 baby girls
2. Milena, 852
3. Mari, 772
4. Mane, 729
5. Annie, 591
6. Anahit, 575
7. Elen, 543
8. Anna, 474
9. Mariam, 442
10. Maria, 410
11. Merry, 391
12. Angelina, 377
13. Gayane, 345
14. Eva, 299
15. Lilit, 294
16. Susanna, 288
17. Sona, 275
18. Hasmik, 258
19. Viktoria, 249
20. Gohar, 237
21. Nataly, 197
22. Karine, 191
23. Yana, 181
24. Sofi, 175
25. Karina, 156
26. Ruzanna, 155
27. Lusine, 152
28. Arevik, 145
29. Liana, 140
30. Anush, 139
31. Marianna, 134
32. Syuzanna, 133
33. Tamara, 122
34. Diana, 121
35. Marina, 116
36. Syuzi, 116
37. Armine, 113
38. Elina, 112
39. Vika, 103
40. Astghik, 102
41. Nane, 100
42. Narine, 99
43. Svetlana, 98
44. Lily, 96
45. Seda, 96
46. Sofya, 95
47. Monika, 95
48. Sara, 94
1. Davit, 1,313 baby boys
2. Narek, 1,144
3. Gor, 808
4. Hayk, 673
5. Alex, 600
6. Erik, 599
7. Tigran, 541
8. Arman, 529
9. Samvel, 490
10. Arthur, 451
11. Alen, 440
12. Armen, 428
13. Aram, 414
14. Ashot, 401
15. Aren, 348
16. Gevorg, 343
17. Areg, 328
18. Sargise, 322
19. Vahe, 302
20. Gagik, 302
21. Arsen, 300
22. Hovhannes, 283
23. Levon, 282
24. Artyom, 270
25. Karen, 263
26. Miqayel, 231
27. Robert, 205
28. Vardan, 181
29. Mher, 177
30. Harutyun, 172
31. Suren, 171
32. Garik, 164
33. Grigor, 157
34. Mark, 153
35. Daniel, 146
36. Hakob, 145
37. Aleksandr, 142
38. Edgar, 140
39. Andranik, 135
40. Hamlet, 135
41. Raphael, 134
42. Manvel, 133
43. Ruben, 133
44. Sergey, 129
45. Vahan, 107
46. Artak, 106
47. Albert, 105
48. Eduard, 104

Why didn’t they just go to 50? We shall never know…

Sources: Nare, David most popular baby names in Armenia in 2012, The most frequently given names to the new-borns by sex [pdf]

Family in California with 17 Children

Vladimir and Zynaida Chernenko of Rancho Cordova, California, welcomed their 17th child in December of 2005.

Here are the names and ages (in 2005) of all 17:

  • Sergey, 22 years old
  • Liliya, 20
  • Andrey, 19
  • Dimitry, 18
  • Anatoliy, 17
  • Lyudmila, 16
  • Anna, 14
  • Vitaliy, 13
  • Oksana, 11
  • Svetlana, 10
  • Inna, 9
  • Vyacheslav, 8
  • Pavel, 6
  • Diana, 5
  • Alina, 3
  • Timofei, 2
  • David, newborn

The first 11 were born in the Ukraine; the last 6 were born after the family moved to the U.S.

Rancho Cordova is part of the Sacramento area, were the “the average family has 3.19 members, according to U.S. Census Bureau statistics.”

The census stops counting once households reach seven or more. Those households make up about 2% of the region of the Sacramento region’s population.

Want to see more sibling names?

Sources: California family has 17 children, Family of 19 is never bored