How popular is the baby name Shea in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Shea and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Shea.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Shea

Number of Babies Named Shea

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Shea

Name Quotes #42 – Tucker, Tess, Shea

tucker, life, 1952

From the cover description of the June 2, 1952, issue of LIFE:

The birthday guest all done up for a party on this week’s cover is Second-Grader Tucker Burns, 7, of New York City.

(A female Tucker born in the mid-1940s? Interesting…)

From “10 facts about Tess of the d’Urbervilles” (pdf) at The Times:

Tess didn’t start out as Tess. Hardy often changed names when he was writing, and he tried out Love, Cis and Sue, using Woodrow as a surname, narrowing the name down to Rose-Mary Troublefield or Tess Woodrow before finally settling on Tess Durbeyfield.

From “Naming a Baby (or 2) When You’re Over 40” by Joslyn McIntyre at Nameberry.com:

But I’m now far too practical for whimsical names. I want to spare my kids the time wasted spelling their name slowly over the phone and correcting its pronunciation millions of times. So out the window went some of the iconoclastic names I loved, but which seemed difficult, along with two names I adored but couldn’t figure out how to spell in a way that would make their pronunciation obvious: CARE-iss and k’r-IN.

From “Why everyone started naming their kids Madison instead of Jennifer” by Meeri Kim in the Washington Post:

While some believed a central institution or figure had to be behind a skyrocketing trend — say, Kim Kardashian or Vogue magazine — researchers have discovered through a new Web-based experiment that doesn’t have to be the case. In fact, the study suggests that populations can come to a consensus about what’s cool and what’s not in a rapid, yet utterly spontaneous way.

From “Name change proves a mysterious and outdated process” by Molly Snyder at OnMilwaukee.com:

The process to change your name is surprisingly lengthy, pricey and arguably outdated. People fill out forms, pay a $168 filing fee (there is also a fee to obtain a new birth certificate once the name is legally granted), get assigned to a judge, schedule a hearing date with the court and take out a statement in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel or the Daily Reporter three weeks in a row declaring intent of name change.

News websites are not approved for legal name change declaration, but this does not mean they couldn’t be someday, according to Milwaukee County Clerk of Circuit Court John Barrett.

“The process is very old and it hasn’t been changed in a long time, but that’s not to say it couldn’t be,” says Barrett. “The Wisconsin legislature decides that. Someone would have to have an interest in that change and take the time to make the argument that we’re in a changing world and publications shouldn’t be limited to print.”

From “The latest trend in startup names? Regular old human names” (Dec. 2014) by Erin Griffith in Fortune:

If you work in startups, there’s a good chance you know Oscar. And Alfred. Benny, too. And don’t forget Lulu and Clara. These aren’t the prominent Silicon Valley people that techies know by first name (although those exist—think Marissa, Satya, Larry and Sergey, Zuck). Rather, Oscar, Alfred, Benny, Lulu and Clara are companies. The latest trend in startup names is regular old human names.

From “A teacher mispronouncing a student’s name can have a lasting impact” by Corey Mitchell at PBS.org:

For students, especially the children of immigrants or those who are English-language learners, a teacher who knows their name and can pronounce it correctly signals respect and marks a critical step in helping them adjust to school.

But for many ELLs, a mispronounced name is often the first of many slights they experience in classrooms; they’re already unlikely to see educators who are like them, teachers who speak their language, or a curriculum that reflects their culture.

“If they’re encountering teachers who are not taking the time to learn their name or don’t validate who they are, it starts to create this wall,” said Rita (‘ree-the’) Kohli, an assistant professor in the graduate school of education at the University of California, Riverside.

It can also hinder academic progress.

From the NPS biography of John Quincy Adams (1767-1848):

Born on July 11, 1767 in Braintree, Massachusetts, he was the son of two fervent revolutionary patriots, John and Abigail Adams, whose ancestors had lived in New England for five generations. Abigail gave birth to her son two days before her prominent grandfather, Colonel John Quincy, died so the boy was named John Quincy Adams in his honor.

(Quincy, Massachusetts, was also named after Colonel John Quincy.)

And finally, from “How Many Mets Fans Name Their Babies ‘Shea’?” by Andrew Beaton in the Wall Street Journal:

You’re not a real Mets fan unless you name your kid Shea.

For more quotes, check out the name quotes category.


Shea, Shae, Shay – Girl Names or Boy Names?

Shea, Shae and Shay - girl names or boy names?

This question has been bringing a lot of traffic to my blog lately, so I thought I’d post about it and see what everyone thinks.

Most of us know of Shea as a surname and/or a stadium name. Shea doesn’t currently rank in the top 1,000 for either boys or girls, but the name and its various spellings do appear further down on the SSA’s list:

Shea 247 girls 155 boys
Shae 114 girls 25 boys
Shay 107 girls 82 boys
Shaye 39 girls 20 boys
Shai* 34 girls 44 boys
Totals: 541 (62%) 326 (38%)

Most versions are used more often for girls than for boys.

What do you think — is Shea a boy name or a girl name? How about other versions of the name? (Does spelling matter?)

*Commenter Panya correctly notes that Shai also happens to be an unrelated Hebrew name. It’s impossible to know which Shais are which, though, so I just counted them all as versions of Shea above.

Baby Names Needed for the Twin Sisters of Thomas

A reader named Eva is expecting twin girls and would like some help naming them. She says:

One of the twins should have a unisex first name and a very girly middle name. For the second twin we want a girly first name and unisex middle name.

Here are the names Eva likes so far:

  • Unisex: Avery, Harper, Morgan, Kennedy, Madison
  • Feminine: Anastasia, Michaela, Caroline, Sofia, Kristina

Her husband is only on board with Avery, Caroline, Kristina and Michaela (he prefers the spelling Makayla).

The twins will have an older brother named Thomas Aiden (nn Tommy) and their surname will be similar to Damon.

Eva’s criteria reminded me of the twins named Charlotte and Dylan I wrote about a few years ago. I think the name Charlotte is a good option in this case, but Dylan plus that surname might be D/N-overload. Here are some other possibilities:

Feminine names Unisex names
Adeline
Amelia
Anne/Annie
Bethany
Camille
Cassandra
Cecilia
Cynthia
Esmé
Fiona
Gemma
Genevieve
Hannah
Helena
Julia
Lydia
Lucy
Maria
Melanie
Melissa
Monica
Nicole
Olivia
Phoebe
Rose
Samantha
Sarah
Tabitha
Theresa
Victoria
Addison
Ainsley
Alexis
Bailey
Cameron
Casey
Cassidy
Emery
Finley
Harley
Jamie
Jordan
Kendall
Leigh
Paige
Parker
Piper
Quinn
Reagan
Reese
Riley
Rowan
Sage
Shea
Sidney
Skylar
Tatum
Taylor
Teagan
Willow

Which of the above names do you like best for Tommy’s sisters? What combinations (either unisex+feminine or feminine+unisex) sound best together, do you think?

Here are a few combinations I like, just to kick things off:

  • Unisex+Feminine: Avery Helena, Cameron Nicole, Riley Caroline
  • Feminine+Unisex: Amelia Quinn, Olivia Willow, Victoria Leigh

Naming a Baby Boy Shay – Yea or Nay?

A reader named Kelly e-mailed me this afternoon about the name Shay for her son. Kelly asked if I knew any girls or boys named Shay, and if I thought the name was “girly.” I’ve already sent her a reply, but my answers were basically:

1. Yes, I’ve met babies/kids of both genders named Shay/Shea/Shae. And the stats tell a similar story–if you look at the top 1,000 baby names in the U.S. over the last 50 years,

  • Shay ranked 15 times for boys and 3 times for girls,
  • Shea ranked 35 times for boys and 31 times for girls, and
  • Shae ranked 0 times for boys and 1 time for girls.

2. Shay doesn’t sound girly to me, but it doesn’t sound masculine either. More like androgynous. (I’d say the same about Peyton, Avery, Dakota, Riley, Jordan, and about a dozen other names.)

What’s your take on Shay: Girl name? Boy name? (Does the spelling make a difference?) Is Shay too girly for a boy?

Related post: Shea, Shae, Shay – Girl Names or Boy Names?

One-Syllable Girl Names – Bree, Hope, Jill, Paige, Tess

Want a baby name that’s short & sweet? Here are over 100 one-syllable girl names:

Anne, Ann
Ayn
Bea
Belle
Bess
Beth
Bjork
Blair, Blaire
Blake, Blayke
Blanche
Bliss
Blythe
Bree, Brie
Britt
Brooke, Brook
Brynn, Bryn, Brynne
Cass
Cate
Claire, Clare, Clair
Dawn
Dee
Dream
Drew, Dru
Elle
Eve
Faith, Fayth
Fawn
Faye, Fay, Fae
Fern
Fleur
Flor
Fran
Gail, Gayle, Gale
Grace, Grayce
Greer
Gwen
Gwyn
Hope
Jade, Jayde, Jaide
Jan
Jane, Jayne
Jean, Jeanne
Jen, Jenn
Jess
Jill
Joan
Joy, Joi, Joie
Joyce
Jude
June
Kai
Kate
Kay, Kaye
Kim
Klaire
Kris
Laine, Lane, Layne
Lark
Leigh, Lee
Liv
Liz
Love
Lux
Luz
Lynn, Lynne, Lyn
Mae, May
Madge
Maeve
Mai
Marge
Maude, Maud
Nelle, Nell
Neve, Niamh
Noor, Nour
Paige, Payge
Pam
Pearl
Queen
Quinn
Rae
Reece, Reese
Rayne, Rain, Raine
Reem
Rose
Rue
Ruth
Sage, Saige
Scout
Shea, Shae, Shay
Skye, Sky
Sloane, Sloan
Sol
Star, Starr
Sue
Tea
Tess
Trish
True, Tru
Wren

See any you like?

P.S. Here are the most popular 1-syllable girl names of 2012, 2011 and 2010.

Huge List of Anagram Baby Names

anagram baby names

Looking for baby names with something in common? Perhaps for a set of twins or triplets? I’ve collected hundreds of anagram baby names for you.

2-Letter Anagram Baby Names

3-Letter Anagram Baby Names

4-Letter Anagram Baby Names

5-Letter Anagram Baby Names

6-Letter Anagram Baby Names

7-Letter Anagram Baby Names

8-Letter Anagram Baby Names

9-Letter Anagram Baby Names

10-Letter Anagram Baby Names

If you like the idea of anagrams but want to avoid sound-alike sets, I recommend anagrams with different numbers of syllables. Pairs like “Etta and Tate” and “Clay and Lacy” are a far more subtle than pairs like “Enzo and Zeno” and “Mary and Myra.”

(Here are some palindromic names from last month.)