How popular is the baby name Shelter in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Shelter and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Shelter.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.

Popularity of the Baby Name Shelter

Number of Babies Named Shelter

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Shelter

Strawberry Responds to Apple

strawberries and creamIn mid-2004, actress Gwyneth Paltrow and musician Chris Martin welcomed a daughter they named Apple.

Soon after, a woman named Strawberry Saroyan (granddaughter of writer William Saroyan) wrote a long letter to the New York Times about her experiences with a fruit-name. Here are some highlights:

  • Strawberry found it helpful to be raised in a “tiny California beach community full of poets, peppered with lots of other kids with unconventional names.” Her younger sister was named Cream, and other kids were named Ivory, Shelter, Wonder, Ocean, Raspberry and Echo.

What were they going to do, make fun of me? They did, but I could bite back. I’ll never forget the terror as Cream and I awaited the arrival of Wonder’s mother to speak with ours because we had been calling her daughter Wonder Bread.

  • When Strawberry was 13, her family moved to a “super-preppy” town in Connecticut. “I had little choice but to change my name, a shift that stuck for three years (I chose Cara).”
  • One of the reasons Strawberry now likes her name is that it serves as an ice-breaker, “especially in the company of other people from well-known families.”

Once when I was in the offices of George magazine, John F. Kennedy Jr. shook my hand enthusiastically. “Strawberry? Tell me about your parents!” The irony seemed delightful: How often had he, perhaps the most famous progeny in the world, gotten to say those words? I wanted to throw the question back at him: what were J.F.K. and Jackie like? But I restrained myself.

Here’s the the full letter: “Named for a Fruit? Make Juice.” (New York Times, 30 May 2004)

Image: eton mess by Mari Liis

Talula Does The Hula From Hawaii …Gets a Name Change

Talula Does The Hula From Hawaii — this used to be the actual name of a 9-year-old girl from New Zealand.

She had been so embarrassed by it that she “had refused to tell her friends her name and went simply by “K”.”

Then Judge Rob Murfitt stepped in. While presiding over a custody hearing for the girl, he decided to make her a ward of the court in order to change her name. He wrote in his ruling:

The court is profoundly concerned about the very poor judgment which this child’s parents have shown in choosing this name. It makes a fool of the child and sets her up with a social disability and handicap, unnecessarily.

Thank you, Judge Murfitt. You did the right thing.

Other baby names Judge Murfitt has seen in the NZ Family Court system include:

Cinderella Beauty Blossom (blocked)
Fat Boy (blocked)
Fish and Chips (twins) (blocked)
Hitler (blocked)
Kaos (blocked)
Keenan Got Lucy (blocked)
Midnight Chardonnay (allowed)
Number 16 Bus Shelter (allowed)
O.crnia (changed to Oceania)
Sex Fruit (blocked)
Spiral Cicada (blocked)
Stallion (blocked)
Twisty Poi (blocked)
Violence (allowed)
Yeah Detroit (blocked)

P.S. Yup, New Zealand is also where 4real‘s name was blocked. (Superman was later approved.)

Source: NZ judge orders ‘odd’ name change