How popular is the baby name Sidonie in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Sidonie and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Sidonie.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Sidonie

Number of Babies Named Sidonie

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Sidonie

The Baby Name Sedona

the baby name sedona

The Arizona city of Sedona was named after the first postmaser’s wife — but only because all the other names he’d submitted to the U.S. Post Office Department got rejected.

The wife in question is Sedona Arabella Miller, born in Missouri in 1877. She pronounced her name “see-dona” and went by the nicknames Donie (as a kid) and Dona (as an adult).

Sedona was the only one in her family with an unusual name; her siblings included Lillie, Edna, Minnie, Noah, and Edward. Her mother said simply, “I liked the sound of it.” It is possible that she had heard the Creole name Sedonie, used among free women of color in the South.

[Sedonie is probably a variant of Sidonie, which is a French feminine form of the Latin name Sidonius, which means “of Sidon.” Sidon was an ancient Phoenician city-state.]

Sedona married Theodore Carlton “T.C.” Schnebly on her 20th birthday, and in 1901 she and T.C. moved to Arizona with their two young children.

Not long after they arrived, T.C. decided the settlement needed a post office, so he applied for a post office name. But all the names he sent in — Schnebly Station, Red Rock Crossing, Oak Creek Station — were rejected, as they were too long to fit on the cancellation stamp beside “Arizona Territory.”

Finally, at the suggestion of his brother, T.C. tried his wife’s name. The relatively short “Sedona” was approved. By mid-1902, T.C. had the Sedona post office up and running “in the back of the Schnebly home.”

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So the baby name Sedona existed before the city did, but it’s never been popular enough to rank in the U.S. top 1,000.

Here’s how many U.S. babies have been named Sedona since the year 2000:

  • 2013: 38 baby girls named Sedona (7 in AZ)
  • 2012: 55 baby girls named Sedona (9 in AZ, 9 in CA)
  • 2011: 51 baby girls named Sedona (6 in AZ, 7 in CA)
  • 2010: 60 baby girls named Sedona (8 in AZ, 12 in CA)
  • 2009: 69 baby girls named Sedona (8 in AZ, 11 in CA)
  • 2008: 91 baby girls named Sedona (18 in AZ, 11 in CA)
  • 2007: 75 baby girls named Sedona (17 in AZ, 7 in CA)
  • 2006: 76 baby girls named Sedona (14 in AZ, 8 in CA)
  • 2005: 58 baby girls named Sedona (6 in AZ, 9 in CA)
  • 2004: 77 baby girls named Sedona (12 in AZ, 10 in CA)
  • 2003: 66 baby girls named Sedona (16 in AZ, 10 in CA)
  • 2002: 76 baby girls named Sedona (14 in AZ, 7 in CA)
  • 2001: 62 baby girls named Sedona (12 in AZ, 9 in CA)
  • 2000: 69 baby girls named Sedona (8 in AZ, 10 in CA)

Baby names that coincide with city names tend to be less popular among locals (i.e., Brooklyn and Madison are less popular among New Yorkers and Wisconsinites, respectively) but that’s not the case for Sedona.

Of the 923 baby girls named Sedona since the turn of the century, 155 (17%) were born in Arizona, making Arizona the state with the most Sedonas.

In second place is California with 120 Sedonas (13%). In third is Texas with 24 Sedonas (3%).

Arizona’s numbers are even more impressive when you consider that both California and Texas welcome several times as many babies as Arizona does per year.

Sources:

[This post was inspired by an Eponymia post about Arizona names.]


Baby Name Needed – Girl Name for Baby #7

A reader named Emily wrote to me late last month. She and her husband need a name for their seventh (!) baby, which will be a little girl. Their six older children are named Kyle, Conor, Nichol, Joelle, Danielle and Anthony.

The only names we’ve agreed on so far are Lucy and Aimee, and I don’t particularly like either, for me they’re too normal and safe. I’d prefer something with a bit of edge, not much, I don’t want to call my child Apple or Fifi Trixibelle, but just something that isn’t dull and isn’t so well-used.

Emily also likes “slightly older names” including Esme, Isabelle, Amelie and Grace, “but [her] hubby has said no to all of these.” She almost had her husband on board with Lexi, but then she changed her mind about the name because “it’s so popular at the moment.”

Here are some of the ideas I came up with. (It’s kind of a hodgepodge, but I mostly aimed for older-sounding names.)

Adelaide
Ainsley
Audra
Aurora
Bethany
Brielle
Calla
Candida
Cassidy
Celeste
Coralie
Dahlia
Daphne
Davina
Edie
Elodie
Fiona
Freya
Gemma
Gwyneth
Hazel
Isla
Leona
Lucille
Luna
Lyra
Mabel
Mara
Maura
Odessa
Rhea
Rosalie
Rowan
Sabine
Sidonie
Talia
Tessa
Tova
Valentina
Zilla

What other suggestions do you have for Emily?

Update, 6/04 – The baby is here! Check the 4th comment to find out what her name is…