How popular is the baby name Sophia in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Sophia and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Sophia.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Sophia

Number of Babies Named Sophia

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Sophia

Popular Baby Names in Los Angeles County, CA, 2013

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health website doesn’t have baby name data for 2016, but it does have data covering 1995 to 2013, so let’s work with that.

The most popular baby names in Los Angeles County in 2013 were Sophia and Jacob. Here are L.A.’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2013:

Girl Names
1. Sophia, 984 baby girls
2. Isabella, 777
3. Mia, 762
4. Emily, 688
5. Emma, 609
6. Sofia, 550
7. Olivia, 473
8. Samantha, 458
9. Victoria, 410
10. Camila, 405

Boy Names
1. Jacob, 948 baby boys
2. Jayden, 926
3. Matthew, 895
4. Ethan, 829
5. Daniel, 784
6. Nathan, 761
7. Noah, 657
8. Anthony, 633
9. Alexander, 617
10. David, 600

And here are some of the baby names that were apparently used just once in L.A. from 1995 to 2013:

Unique Girl Names Unique Boy Names
Aijia, Bobbierose, Coakley, Dashley, Ella-Lily, Fallen Star, Georgedith, Haydeline, Ilynne, Jatalia, Khando, Luna Sol, Mexeen, Nonoka, Ofri, Purple, Qiqi, Rhofanie, Sloka, Ting, Ulani, Vixi, Wonder, Xanterra, Yudibeth, Zayleen Abbos, Banksy, Clifford, Dro, Exsol, Foxton, Guster, Holtzen, Iniesta, Jayden-Dreden, Kayd, Leviathan, Mondrick, Noaz, Ordisi, Pocky, Querbin, Rundy, Snayther, Tarzis, Uyedon, Verwyn, Westgene, Xinran, Yitzchack, Zander Ray

Want to see more California baby names? Here are Sonoma’s rankings for 2015 and San Diego’s rankings for 2016.

Source: Find a Baby Name – L.A. County Public Health


Baby Names Inspired by the Solar Eclipse

baby names, solar eclipse

On August 21, the United States will see its first coast-to-coast solar eclipse since 1918. If you’re planning to have — or conceive! — a baby around the time of the eclipse, you might be interested in a name that marks the event (but that isn’t as audacious as Eclipse itself). So what are your options?

Names with “celestial” associations

A solar eclipse involves the alignment of three celestial bodies — the sun (a star), the moon, and the Earth — in the sky. You could use a name that is associated in some way with one of these elements, such as…

“Sun” names Helios, Elio, Sunny, Sol, Solange, Soleil, Solaris, Ravi, Samson, Surya, Sunniva, Haruko, Hinata
“Star” names Star, Stella, Estelle, Starla, Astra, Seren, Tara, Citlali, Hoshi
“Moon” names Luna, Moon, Selene, Selena, Chandra, Mahina, Qamar, Dawa
“Earth” names Eartha, Gaia, Tierra, Tlaloc, Avani
“Sky” names Sky, Skyla, Skylar, Lani, Miku, Akash, Alya, Celeste, Celestine, Ciel, Sora

Names with “dark” associations

The main event, from an Earthling’s perspective, is the darkening of the sun thanks to the moon getting in the way and casting its shadow over us. You could use a name associated in some way with darkness, such as…

“Shadow” names Shade, Umbra, Shadow, Zillah
“Dark” or “Black” names Melanie, Duff, Dubhan, Ciar, Ciara, Ciaran, Sullivan*, Krishna, Charna, Jett, Raven
“Night” names Nisha, Layla, Nyx, Lilith, Miyako, Rajnish

*Sullivan essentially means “descendant of the little dark eye” in Irish — weirdly appropriate for a solar eclipse baby name, don’t you think?

Name combos with both “celestial” and “dark” associations

You could combine some of the “celestial” and “dark” names above to get something more specific, like…

  • Layla Soleil: “night” and “sun”
  • Jett Samson: “black” and “sun”
  • Ciaran Sol: “black” and “sun”
  • Melanie Stella: “dark” and “star” (“Dark Star” is also a Grateful Dead song)
  • Luna Zillah: “moon” and “shadow” (“Moon Shadow” is also a Cat Stevens song)

Names (or name combos) featuring the letters “S” and “E”

This is as inconspicuous as it gets. Commemorate the solar eclipse simply by using the letters “S” and “E” in combination. You could choose a single name that starts with “Se-,” like…

Seeta
Sela
Selene (“moon” in Greek)
Selma
Seraphina
Seren (“star” in Welsh)
Serenity
Sean
Sebastian
Sefton
Sergio
Seth
Severino
Seymour

Or, you could use a pair of names that start with “S-” and “E-,” such as…

Sally Esther
Scarlett Eve
Sophia Eloise
Susanna Elizabeth
Samuel Elijah
Shane Everett
Stanley Edward
Sylvester Ellis

Which of the above names (or combos) do you like most? What other solar eclipse-themed ideas would you add to this list?

Sources: When & Where to See the Solar Eclipse of August 21, 2017, Two Minutes Of Darkness With 20,000 Strangers

Popular Baby Names in New South Wales, 2016

According to data released in April by the NSW Registry of Births, Deaths & Marriages, the most popular baby names in New South Wales, Australia, in 2016 were Olivia and Oliver.

Here are NSW’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Olivia, 629 baby girls
2. Charlotte, 561
3. Amelia, 471
4. Ava, 451
5. Mia, 430
6. Chloe, 427
7. Emily, 387
8. Grace, 346 (tie)
9. Isla, 346 (tie)
10. Ruby, 341

Boy Names
1. Oliver, 668 baby boys
2. William, 557
3. Jack, 511
4. Noah, 499
5. Lucas, 453
6. James, 439
7. Ethan, 424
8. Thomas, 411
9. Alexander, 372
10. Leo, 359

In 2014, the two top names were the same. In between, in 2015, the #1 girl name was Charlotte instead of Olivia.

In the girls’ top 10, Isla and Ruby replace Zoe (now 12th) and Sophia (now 13th).

In the boys’ top 10, Leo replaces Isaac (now 14th).

Interestingly, the girls’ top 100 includes both Maddison and Madison — and the double-d version ranks considerably higher than the single-d version (45th vs. 68th). In contrast, in the U.S., Madison ranks 15th and Maddison 338th.

Source: Facts & Statistics – BDM – NSW Government

Name Quotes #53: DeVante, Ella, Buffalo

Time for some name quotes!

From a Movie Pilot interview with John Knoll, who came up with the name for Rogue One character Jyn Erso:

“My youngest daughter is Jane, and my wife is Jen, so [Jyn] is sort of mashup of them. And growing up my aunt was Aunt Ginny, [short] for Virginia, so there’s a little bit of that, too. It’s a mix up of a lot of my favorite women in my life.”

[Do you think Jyn will debut in the SSA data in 2017?]

From an A.V. Club review of the Black-ish episode “The Name Game,” in which characters argued about the name DeVante:

Dre’s point that names like Matthew, David, and Kevin don’t mean anything to him is fair. He wants to name his son after the actual culture and people he grew up around, and he hates the fact that when “something is black the world thinks that it’s bad.” Appeasing white culture with a name that has no cultural signifiers creates the type of internalized hatred that causes characters like Ruby and Charlie to respond so negatively to black names.

From a Telegraph essay by Sophia Money-Coutts about how absurd names build character:

But it’s enormously character building, being given an absurd name. It teaches you fortitude and tolerance because you will have to explain it 73 times a day. No use in labelling your children as George and Amal Clooney have just done. They’ve called their twins Ella and Alexander. I mean, they’re all right. Ella will probably grow up to be a florist or a yoga teacher and Alexander sounds like he might sell houses in Fulham. But what is life if you don’t grow up justifying your name to everyone you meet? Being called something silly means you can never take yourself too seriously.

From a Seattle Times article about what it’s like to share the name Alexa with the Amazon device:

Even though she’s never been on the receiving end of any commands or jokes, [Alexa] Wakefield remembers her first reaction to Alexa being, “How are they [Amazon] sort of allowed to use somebody’s name, like a more common name, as something like a robotic command,” she says, “It seems like a little bit of a violation.”

Later, she adds, “It’s placing your name in a subservient manner.”

These days, Wakefield says she’s learned to “look on the bright side.” “It’s sort of a feeling of pride,” she says, “Like a person named Alexa is very helpful!”

From a Cup of Jo post about offbeat middle names:

My friend gave her baby the middle name “Swift” because her labor was so quick.

Our friends chose the middle name “Buffalo” for their son because it was his dad’s nickname growing up. “It took my husband nine months to convince me,” my friend told me. “Then, in the middle of the night after signing the birth certificate, I had a mild panic attack at the hospital. Now I love it.”

From a Science of Us post about why it’s so hard to remember someone’s name:

There is a very simple reason why it’s so easy for the names of new acquaintances to slip right out of your head within moments of being introduced: Names are kind of meaningless. Memory experts say that the more pathways back to a memory you have, the easier it becomes to retrieve that memory, and this just doesn’t often happen naturally with names.

[…]

Sure, there may be family history or a great deal of sentimental meaning behind a person’s first name, but when you meet someone at a party, there’s no readily apparent reason why this guy should be named Mike and that guy should be named Max.

From an interview with CUNY business school student Janeflora Henriques:

When I was born, my oldest sister (who was a difficult child) insisted I be named “Florence” after a movie actress she idolized. My sister threatened consequences if I weren’t. On the other hand, the tradition of my tribe dictated that I be named after my dad’s eldest sister. Fearing whiplash from in-laws, my mother was wary to skip naming me after my aunt. At the same time, my mother was concerned about a daughter who said she would have nothing to do with me if I weren’t named Florence. So my mother shortened my aunt Jennifer’s name to “Jane” and Florence to “Flora” and gave me both.

From a Guardian article about extinct Hyoliths and their “helens”:

We all tend associate certain qualities to people’s names, usually on the basis of people we have known. Helen, for example, is a very sensible name. I associate it with practical, dependable people I have known. You can rely on a Helen. A quick look at the ONS data for girls’ names in England and Wales tells me that it reached a high point of number 8 in the list of baby names in both 1964 and 1974. It’s also the technical term for a hyolith appendage: a hyolithid has a pair of helens. I think this is utterly brilliant. The original paper from 1975 says “We term these … structures helens because the word has no functional connotations, and they were first described under the generic name Helenia by Walcott”. Really? Or did they know a Helen?

Want to see more quotes about names? Check out the name quotes category.

Popular Baby Names in North Dakota

According to data released earlier this year by the North Dakota Department of Health, the most popular baby names in the state in 2016 were Harper & Olivia (tie) and Oliver.

Here are North Dakota’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Harper, 65 baby girls (2-way tie)
2. Olivia, 65 (2-way tie)
3. Emma, 63
4. Evelyn, 59
5. Amelia, 45 (2-way tie)
6. Charlotte, 45 (2-way tie)
7. Ella, 43
8. Nora, 42
9. Addison, 39
10. Ava, 38

Boy Names
1. Oliver, 74 baby boys
2. William, 64
3. Easton, 54
4. Owen, 52
5. Liam, 51
6. Mason, 49
7. James, 46
8. Henry, 45
9. Wyatt, 44
10. Hudson, 43

In the girls’ top 10, Evelyn, Amelia, Ella, and Addison replace Sophia, Avery, Paisley, and Aubrey.

In the boys’ top 10, James and Hudson replace Carter and Noah.

In 2015, the top names were Emma (now 3rd) and Liam (now 5th).

Interestingly, North Dakota is the only state where Easton is a top-five boy name. Switching over to the SSA data, we can track the rise of Easton in ND:

  • 2016: Easton ranked 3rd in ND
  • 2015: Easton ranked 9th in ND
  • 2014: Easton ranked 6th in ND
  • 2013: Easton ranked 5th in ND
  • 2012: Easton ranked 29th in ND
  • 2011: Easton ranked 9th in ND
  • 2010: Easton ranked 23rd in ND
  • 2009: Easton ranked 47th in ND
  • 2008: Easton ranked 42nd in ND
  • 2007: Easton ranked 64th in ND (first time in top 100)

In the four states that share a border with North Dakota — Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, and Minnesota — the name Easton ranked 52nd, 11th, 31st, and 35th (respectively) in 2016.

Sources: North Dakota Fast Facts 2016 (pdf), Popular Names by State