How popular is the baby name Stanislaus in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Stanislaus and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Stanislaus.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Stanislaus

Number of Babies Named Stanislaus

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Stanislaus

The Movie-Star Baby Name Franchot

Franchot Tone, 1930s
Franchot Tone
Uniquely named female film stars were inspiring debuts on the baby name charts as early as the 1910s, starting with Francelia in 1912.

But the first male film star to inspire a baby name debut didn’t come along until the 1930s.

That film star was actor Franchot Tone. He shot to fame in 1933, the year he appeared in seven films — including one with Jean Harlow, another with Loretta Young, and two with Joan Crawford (his future wife).

The name Franchot debuted on the SSA’s baby name list the very next year:

  • 1938: 7 baby boys named Franchot
  • 1937: 10 baby boys named Franchot
  • 1936: 21 baby boys named Franchot
  • 1935: 6 baby boys named Franchot
  • 1934: 9 baby boys named Franchot [debut]
  • 1933: unlisted

In fact, it was one of the top baby name debuts of 1934.

The usage of Franchot peaked in 1936, the year Tone appeared in the very successful 1935 film Mutiny on the Bounty. (Movita, Marlon Brando’s future wife, was also in the film.)

Franchot Tone’s birth name was Stanislaus Pascal Franchot Tone. Franchot, pronounced fran-cho, was his mother’s maiden name. It’s one of the many names (and surnames) that can be traced back to the Late Latin Franciscus, meaning “Frankish” or “Frenchman.”

What do you think of the baby name Franchot?

Source: Franchot Tone – Wikipedia

Name Prediction from 1964

This comes from a newspaper article published in the mid-1960s:

The American melting pot has made something of a stew of old world cultures. Isaac and Rebecca Goldberg are the parents not of Moses and Rachael, but of Donald and Marie. Hjalmar and Sigrid Johanson are the parents of Richard and Dorothy. It seems rather a shame that Axel and Jens, Helma and Ingeborg, not to mention Stanislaus and Giacomo and Pedro and Vladimir have just about disappeared. The custom seems to be for the first generation to anglicize the given name as soon as possible. The next generation or two branches out and we get Pat Johnson, even Angus Puccini. Then, after a few generations, there is a tentative reach backward for the Shawns or even the Seans. Katy’s real name may again be Caitlin, Pat’s Padriac.

The last two sentences are rather prescient. We see many parents nowadays taking that “tentative reach backward” to find a name that pays tribute to their cultural heritage. The key, of course, is finding a name that conforms to modern tastes. Names like Hjalmar and Zbigniew may be legit family names, but they’re probably a no-go. Family names like Giuliana and Liam, on the other hand, fit right in.

Source: “Quite a Problem, Naming the Baby.” Eugene Register-Guard 9 Feb. 1964: 10A.

Baby Name Story – Cleveland

Back in 1910, Mr. and Mrs. Stanislaus Kottarsky were traveling by ship from Austria to the United States. They were ultimately bound for Cleveland, Ohio.

What was the name of the ship? The SS Cleveland, coincidentally.

So when Mrs. Kottarsky gave birth to a son during the journey, the couple decided to stick with the theme. They named their baby boy Cleveland.

And that’s not all.

The ship brought 6,000 canaries from the Hartz Mountains, and the man in charge of them gave a fine singer to the parents. Kottarsky said he would name the bird Cleveland also.


Source: “Named the Baby Cleveland.” New York Times 10 Oct. 1910: 20.