How popular is the baby name Storm in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Storm and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Storm.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Storm

Number of Babies Named Storm

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Storm

Names in the News: Eclipse, Searyl, Luuuke

Some recent and not-so-recent baby names from the news…

Apollo: A baby boy born in the Canadian town of Kelowna at the start of the solar eclipse on August 21, 2017, was named Niall Apollo — Apollo after the Greek god of the sun. (Castanet)

Charles: A baby boy born in Missouri in October of 2016 with the help of St. Charles County ambulance district paramedics was named Charles. (Fox 2)

Chepkura: A baby girl born in Kenya on August 8, 2017, while her mother was at a polling station waiting in line to vote, named Chepkura. In Swahili, kura means “ballot” or “vote.” (BBC)

Eclipse: A baby girl born in South Carolina on the day of the solar eclipse was named Eclipse Alizabeth. (The State)

Garavi, Sanchi, and Taravi: Triplet baby girls born in Gujarat in September of 2017 were named Garavi, Sanchi, and Taravi after India’s Good and Services Tax (GST), introduced by PM Narendra Modi on July 1. (India Times)

GST: A baby born in Rajasthan in the wee hours of July 1, 2017, was named GST. (Indian Express)

Harvey: A baby boy born in Texas in August of 2017 amid the floodwaters of Hurricane Harvey was named Harvey. (Washington Post)

Kessel: A baby boy born in Pittsburgh in May of 2017 was named Kessel after Pittsburgh Penguins forward Phil Kessel. (NHL)

Jetson: A baby boy born on June 18, 2017, aboard a Jet Airways flight from Dammam to Kochi was named Jetson after the Indian airline. (The Asian Age)

Justin-Trudeau: A baby boy born in Calgary on May 4, 2017, to a Syrian refugee family was named Justin-Trudeau in honor of Canada’s prime minister. (CTV News)

Luuuke: A baby boy born in North Carolina in July of 2017 was named Cameron Luuuke after Carolina Panthers players Cameron Newton and Luke Kuechly. “[W]hen Kuechly is performing well on the field, the crowd screams “Luuuuuuuuke,” which is why the family has spelled their son’s middle name using three u’s.” (Fox 46)

Lyric: A baby girl born on March 19, 2017, to A. J. McLean of the vocal group the Backstreet Boys was named Lyric. (People)

Mangala: A baby girl born in India in January of 2017 aboard a Mangala Express train en route from Mangalore to Jhansi was named Mangala. (Indian Express)

Nicole: A baby girl born in late 2015 at just 27 weeks in an emergency C-section was named Hadley Nicole – Nicole after delivery nurse Nicole Kenney. (WIVB Buffalo)

Noah Harvey: A baby boy born on August 29, 2017, “while Tropical Storm Harvey was raging across his hometown of Beaumont, Texas” was named Noah Harvey. (Deseret News)

Pajero Sport: A baby boy born in Indonesia in April of 2017 was named Pajero Sport after the Mitsubishi Pajero Sport SUV because “we just happen to be fans,” said the father. (Coconuts Jakarta)

Pasley: A baby girl born in Minnesota in June of 2017 was named Shirah Pasley Yang — middle name in honor of Jane Pasley, the organ donor whose kidney was received by Kari Yang, Shirah’s mother. (Pioneer Press)

Searyl Atli: A baby born in Canada in November of 2016 “could be the first in the world to not have a gender designation.” The baby’s gender-neutral first and middle names are Searyl and Atli. (BBC)

Starla: A baby girl born in Colorado on August 2, 2017, in a car on the way to the hospital was “named Starla because of her dramatic entrance.” (Denver7)

Storm: A baby girl born in Miami in September of 2017, as Hurricane Irma approached the region, was named Nayiri Storm. (Weather Channel)

Syria: A baby girl born in Moscow in November of 2015 was named Syria “after her father’s military assignment destination.” (Moscow Times)


American Gladiator Names vs. Real-Life Baby Names

american gladiators trading card
I had no idea American Gladiators trading cards existed before I wrote this post.
Ready for a game?

The original American Gladiators TV show (1989-1996) featured 32 American Gladiators and 31 mostly-tough-sounding Gladiator names. (Why 31? Because “Lace” was used twice.) Here are the 31 names:

  1. Atlas
  2. Blaze
  3. Bronco
  4. Cyclone
  5. Dallas
  6. Diamond
  7. Elektra
  8. Gemini
  9. Gold
  10. Havoc
  11. Hawk
  12. Ice
  13. Jade
  14. Jazz
  15. Lace
  16. Laser
  17. Malibu
  18. Nitro
  19. Rebel
  20. Sabre
  21. Siren
  22. Sky
  23. Storm
  24. Sunny
  25. Tank
  26. Thunder
  27. Titan
  28. Tower
  29. Turbo
  30. Viper
  31. Zap

The short-lived American Gladiators remake (2008) featured 20 new gladiators and 18 new tough-sounding gladiator names. (Why 18? Because Siren and Titan were recycled from the original.) Here are the 18 new names:

  1. Beast
  2. Crush
  3. Fury
  4. Hellga
  5. Hurricane
  6. Jet
  7. Justice
  8. Mayhem
  9. Militia
  10. Panther
  11. Phoenix
  12. Rocket
  13. Stealth
  14. Steel
  15. Toa
  16. Venom
  17. Wolf
  18. Zen

So here’s the game: Try to guess what percentage of the 31 original Gladiator names and what percentage of the 18 new Gladiator names have appeared on at least one of the SSA’s annual baby name lists. (To appear on a list, a name has to be given to at least 5 U.S. babies in a single year.)

Come up with your guesses before reading on!

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Ok, here are the answers.

Of the 31 original American Gladiator names, 23 have appeared on an SSA list: Atlas, Blaze, Bronco, Dallas, Diamond, Elektra, Gemini, Gold, Havoc, Hawk, Jade, Jazz, Lace, Malibu, Rebel, Sabre, Siren, Sky, Storm, Sunny, Tank, Thunder and Titan. That’s 74%.

Of the 18 remake American Gladiator names, 9 have appeared on an SSA list: Fury, Jet, Justice, Phoenix, Rocket, Steel, Toa, Wolf and Zen. That’s exactly 50%.

How close did you get to 74% and 50%?

Approved and Rejected Baby Names in Iceland

The recent news about the Icelandic girl named Blær reminds me…

Did you know that the Mannanafnanefnd, Iceland’s Personal Names Committee, puts its baby name rulings online? Every acceptance and rejection going back to 2001 is available.

One particularly interesting ruling is the split decision that happened in late 2008 over the name Skallagrímur, which was ultimately rejected.

But the Mannanafnanefnd’s rulings are in Icelandic, and if you don’t read Icelandic, well, they’re a bit hard to make out. :) So, to make it easier, here are current lists of Iceland’s approved and rejected baby names:

Over 1,700 boy names and over 1,800 girl names have been given the Iceland’s stamp of approval so far.

Sources: I ain’t the only one who loves names!, Icelandic Name Committee Reaches Rare Split Decision

UPDATED, 7/9/14 – The government of Iceland now has a separate website for approved and rejected baby names. I’ve just updated all the links.

Baby Named for Hurricane Sandy

hurricaneInevitably, at least one baby out there has been named after superstorm Sandy.

Fernando Dimas Martinez and Anahi Sanchez Moreno of Brooklyn welcomed a baby girl a few hours before the storm hit.

Martinez had been considering “Jacqueline,” but after hearing nonstop storm reports at the restaurant where he works, he opted for a name reflecting current events.

The baby’s full name is Sandra Sanchez, nickname Sandy.

Source: Borough Park couple’s baby named after superstorm Sandy

UPDATE, 11/2013: Just found the story of another New York baby named for Sandy: Adrian Storm Kusek, born on Oct. 29, son of Kinga and Pawel Kusek.

Name Quotes for the Weekend #6

Nick Lachey on how his son Camden was named (via Inquisitr):

“It’s kind of a funny story. I’ve always liked the name Colin. We thought that Colin would be the name. And John is my dad’s name…But as we got further into it, I learned that Vanessa wasn’t a big fan of the name Colin, so we started looking for another ‘C’ name.”

But Minnillo’s OB-GYN was located on Camden Drive, and Nick Lachey says it was there that inspiration struck, and he suggested the street name to Vanessa. It was then, he says, the name stuck:

“We didn’t really know anyone else named Camden. It was such a neat name. We fell in love with it and decided on it five or six months ago.”

Jools Oliver–wife of celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, and mom to Poppy Honey, Daisy Boo, Petal Blossom Rainbow and Buddy Bear–on baby names (via Gurgle magazine):

I hate people’s opinions on names; whatever you call your baby is your decision.

The #1 thing this expectant mom would have done differently regarding her pregnancy (via Momaroo):

1) Keep the name choices to myself. […] We got a few positive reactions, with questions, because the names we chose weren’t common but have deep meaning for us. One friend, however, made a face & said the boy name we picked was old fashioned & he would be teased for it & asked why we picked it in the first place. Then she told my husband that the first boy was “supposed to be named after him” & reiterated the teasing part. All of this caused quite a few arguments between me & my husband.

From UK radio DJ Andy Walker, who asked listeners to call in with “the most unusual names you have heard for someone.”

Charlene Fitzgerald told me her friend named her twins Storm and Lightning. Oh, come on! Was the mother a fan of the weather, or superheroes?

The names kept on coming – Michelle Edwards knows of a dad who is an avid Manchester United fan, so much so that his daughter is called Manchester and his son is named Bobby.

The randomness did not cease as Caroline Loughrey posted on kmfm Drivetime Facebook page that her sister-in-law has named her daughter Galactica.

Clare Turk said that is becoming popular to name a daughter, Lanesra – which is Arsenal backwards. Really? That is the first time I have ever heard of doing that.

Other names that came to my attention were Simba for a son, Seksy for a daughter – good luck with that during the school register – and a boy called Trucker. You can guess what his father did for a living.

From “Don’t name your Jewish baby Meth, if that was the plan” in j.weekly:

Names are, as scientists know, critical to one’s success in life and how people perceive us. It’s unlikely you’d name your newborn son “Methuselah,” since the name connotes an old man with a long beard and exhausted medical benefits. Nor would it help to nickname your son “Meth.”

From “Amarillo’s first baby of 2009” in the Amarillo Globe-News:

When Dominic James Brown entered the world shortly after midnight on New Year’s Day, he brought with him controversy that shook the maternity ward of Baptist St. Anthony’s Hospital.

The newborn, named after a character from the film “Kindergarten Cop,” beat out his closest competition by a mere six minutes – snatching the title of Amarillo’s first baby of the year.

I’m kinda shocked that people not only remember Kindergarten Cop, but still like it enough after all these years to name a baby after one of the characters.

From “Malaysia’s ‘Baby-Dumping’ Epidemic” at Bloomberg.com:

Out-of-wedlock children across Malaysia are given this same surname (illegitimate boys receive “bin Abdullah”), permanently stigmatizing them in a very family-oriented society.

The surname for girls (mentioned a few sentences earlier) was “binti Abdullah.”