How popular is the baby name Susie in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Susie and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Susie.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Susie

Number of Babies Named Susie

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Susie

Baby Names Approved & Rejected in Iceland Recently

So far this year, Iceland’s Personal Names Committee (Mannanafnanefnd) has reached a verdict on nearly three dozen first names:

Female names

  • Rejected: Adriana, Daniela, Dyljá (“disguise”), Gígí, Swanhildur, Zoe
  • Approved: Ára, Beata, Dalrún, Ísbjört, Jóhanndína, List, Mæja, Rósý, Silfra (“silver”), Susie, Yngveldur, Þorbrá

Male names

  • Rejected: Einarr
  • Approved: Baui, Freymann, Gestar, Jötunn (“hulk”), Kinan, Líó, Lói, Manuel, Mummi, Olli, Raknar, Sæmar, Tobbi, Toddi, Ugluspegill*

*Ugluspegill ultimately comes from Till Eulenspiegel, the name of a character in German folklore and literature. Till Eulenspiegel was a peasant trickster whose jests and jokes were “broadly farcical, often brutal, sometimes obscene; but they [had] a serious theme.” The name Eulenspiegel is made up of Germanic elements meaning “owl” and “mirror.”

Sources: Yngveldur samþykkt en Swanhildi hafnað, Till Eulenspiegel – Britannica.com, Ugluspegill – Nordic Names


List of Female Names from 1888

female names, 1888

A while ago I found a book called “A Collection of Original Acrostics on Ladies’ Christian Names” that was published in Toronto in 1888.

I won’t post any of the poems, which are all pretty cheesy, but author George J. Howson does include an intriguing selection of names. He notes that he wrote acrostics for “all the most popular feminine christian names of the day, and many more that, while not in common use, are known to exist in actual life.”

Here’s the list:

Abigail
Ada
Adelaide
Adelle
Adeline
Addie
Aggie
Agnes
Alberta
Alecia
Aletha
Alfretta
Alice
Allie
Alma
Almeda
Almira
Alta
Althea
Alvira
Alzina
Amanda
Amelia
Amy
Ann
Anna
Annabell
Annas
Annette
Angelia
Angeline
Annie
Athaliah
Athelia
Augusta
Aura
Avis
Barbara
Beatrice
Bell
Bella
Berdie
Bertha
Bertie
Bessie
Beulah
Blanche
Bridget
Calista
Carrie
Carlotta
Cassie
Catherine
Cecilia
Cela
Celia
Celicia
Celis
Charlotte
Chloe
Christie
Christine
Clara
Clarissa
Cleanthe
Clementina
Constance
Cora
Cordelia
Corinne
Cornelia
Cynthia
Cyrena
Debbie
Delia
Della
Diana
Diantha
Dinah
Dollie
Dora
Dorcas
Dorinda
Dorothy
Edith
Edna
Effie
Ella
Eleanor
Eleanora
Electa
Ellen
Elfie
Eliza
Elma
Elsie
Emma
Emmeline
Emily
Ena
Erma
Estelle
Esther
Ethel
Ethelind
Ettie
Eugenie
Eula
Eunice
Euphemia
Euretta
Eva
Evalina
Eveline
Evelyn
Fannie
Felicia
Flora
Florence
Floss
Frances
Frank
Gay
Georgie
Georgina
Geraldine
Gertie
Gracie
Hagar
Hannah
Harriet
Hattie
Helen
Helena
Henrietta
Hulda
Ida
Irene
Isabel
Isabella
Isadora
Jane
Janet
Janie
Jeannette
Jemima
Jennet
Jennie
Jessie
Jerusha
Joanna
Josephine
Josie
Julia
Kate
Kathleen
Katie
Keziah
Lany
Laura
Leah
Leila
Lena
Lera
Lettie
Levina
Levinia
Libbie
Lida
Lilian
Lillie
Lizzie
Lola
Lora
Lorretta
Lottie
Lou
Louisa
Louise
Lucinda
Lucretia
Lucy
Luella
Lula
Lulu
Lydia
Mabel
Madelaine
Maggie
Malvina
Mamie
Marcella
Margaret
Maria
Marilla
Marion
Mary
Marsena
Martha
Mattie
Maud
Maudie
May
Melinda
Mellissa
Mercy
Mertie
Mildred
Millie
Mina
Minerva
Minnie
Mintha
Miranda
Mollie
Muriel
Myra
Myrtle
Nancy
Naomi
Nellie
Nettie
Nina
Nora
Ollie
Olive
Olivia
Ormanda
Ophelia
Pauline
Pearl
Phoebe
Phyllis
Priscilla
Prudence
Rachel
Rebecca
Rhoda
Robena
Rosa
Rosabel
Rosalie
Rosalind
Rosamond
Rose
Ruby
Ruth
Sabina
Sadie
Sally
Samantha
Sarah
Selina
Sophia
Sophronia
Stella
Susanna
Susie
Sybil
Teresa
Theodocia
Theresa
Tillie
Una
Verna
Victoria
Vida
Viola
Violet
Wilhelmina
Winifred
Zuba

Have any favorites?

Hulda/Huldah is one I like. It’s one of those names that I always see on old New England gravestones but never come across in real life. Wonder when that one will become stylish again.

BTW, has anyone ever seen a good name acrostic? Like, one that’s actually well-written and/or thought-provoking? Because I don’t think I ever have.

Source: A Collection of Original Acrostics on Ladies’ Christian Names by George J. Howson

Family in Colorado with 12 Children

Earlier today, my husband sent me an article about Dan and Susie Kellogg and their 12 children. The entire family, from Colorado, has lived in an RV full-time since last fall.

I was intrigued when I read that all 12 Kellogg kids have names ending in y. But the family blog, Kellogg Show, makes it clear that the Kellogg kids simply have nicknames ending in y:

  1. Kerrigan, “Kerry” (b. 1993)
  2. Graden, “Grady” (b. 1996)
  3. Broden Michael, “Brody” (b. 1997)
  4. Kadrian, “Kady” (b. 1998)
  5. Kendon Thomas, “Kenny” (b. 2000)
  6. Dallan Patrick, “Dally” (b. 2001)
  7. Carden David, “Cardy” (b. 2003)
  8. Madigan Grace, “Maddy” (b. 2005)
  9. Rowden Vincent, “Rowdy” (b. 2007)
  10. Emmelyn Trinity, “Emmy” (b. 2008)
  11. Ellevyn Noelle, “Elly” (b. 2010)
  12. Cody (b. 2012) – not sure if it’s a nickname

Did you catch Ellevyn for the eleventh child? That would’ve been a good one for an 11-11-11 baby.

Which of the given names above do you like the best? And, which nickname is your favorite?

Source: Family of 14 gives up everything to live in RV

Babies Named for California Getaways

Susie Albin-Najera and Rick Najera of California have three kids, each of whom is named for a location in California:

  1. Son Julian was named after Julian, California.
  2. Daughter Sonora was named for Sonora, California.
  3. Daughter Kennedy was named after the Kennedy Meadows resort.

“All our kids are named after places we love,” Albin-Najera said.

Other babies named after special locations include Aquinnah, Brighton, Elora and Georgian.

Source: Morris, Mike. “Couple names baby after Kennedy Meadows.” Union Democrat 29 Oct. 2007: A1+.

Baby Named After Highway Exit in Pennsylvania

I know of dozens of babies that were named after cars. (And jeeps!) But this is the only one I know of that was named for a highway exit:

Susie and Dan McLaughlin of Meadville, Pennsylvania, were expecting a baby boy in the summer of 1998. When Susie went into labor, they got into Susie’s sister’s car and began heading toward the hospital via I-79. The baby wasn’t willing to wait that long, though, so they pulled over next to Erie County’s McKean exit and Susie gave birth in the back seat. The baby was named Keane after the exit.

Source: “Baby Named After Highway Exit.” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 17 July 1998: B-4.

Babies Named for Song – Raina, Susie and Liza Minnelli

Here are a few music-inspired baby names I’ve come across recently.

First is Raina, a baby girl born in Canada in June of 2008. Her name was inspired by the Peter Himmelman song “Raina,” which you can listen to at Himmelman’s website.

Second is Susie, one of the first babies born in the Denver metro area in 2008. “Susie got her name because her [4-year-old] brother liked to sing Wake Up Little Susie to his sister when she was in the womb.”

Last but not least is Liza–yep, that Liza. Liza Minelli, daughter of Judy Garland, was born in 1946. I didn’t realize until a few days ago, though, that she was named for the Gershwin song “Liza (All the Clouds’ll Roll Away)” from the musical Show Girl (1929). Here’s a live version of “Liza (All the Clouds’ll Roll Away)” [vid] sung by Judy herself.

Sources: A stream of love, honour ancestry for baby Raina, New Year’s Baby Named After Song

Baby Name Needed – Full Name for Susie

A reader named Kristina writes:

My husband insists on naming our daughter after his mother. He doesn’t necessarily want to name her Susan, her full name, but insists on calling her Susie. I have been trying to come up with names containing the word Sue in them not necessarily at the beginning, but more so in the middle or end of the name.

Hm. This is a tricky one.

Here are some names that include a “su” element:

  • Atsuko, Etsuko, Kasumi, Mitsuko, Sumiko, Suzu, Suzume, Yasu, and other Japanese names. Though these probably won’t make sense unless the baby has some sort of connection to Japan.
  • Sumana, Sumati, Sunita, Suniti, Sushila, Sunila, Suparna, Supriti, and other Indian names. But the connection thing applies for these as well (and to the group below).
  • Consuelo, Asunción, Jesusa, and perhaps a few other Spanish and/or religious names.
  • Ursula seems to be the only traditional “English” name that fits the bill, but the nickname Sula is more natural-sounding for Ursula than Susie. Also, there’s that unshakable (and unfortunate) sea-witch association.
  • Sunny, Sunshine, Sunday, and Summer are word-names that could work, though they seem like a stretch because the vowel-sounds don’t match up.

So, as you can see, I had a pretty tough time coming up with suitable “su” names.

Of course, I’m avoiding the obvious — the many Susan-related names (e.g. Susanna, Suzette, Suellen) out there. It seems Kristina wants to avoid “Susan” specifically, but maybe some other name from this family would work?

Another idea would be get a bit abstract about the nicknaming. For instance, Alexandra, Alessandra and Anastasia include S- and Z-sounds…instead of the typical nicknames like Alex and Ana, what about Susie for these?

What other ideas would you offer to Kristina?