How popular is the baby name Tamara in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Tamara and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Tamara.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Tamara

Number of Babies Named Tamara

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Tamara

Popular Girl Names: Biblical vs. Non-Biblical

The ratio of Biblical names to non-Biblical names in the girl’s top 20 is about the same today as it was 100 years ago, though the ratio did change a bit mid-century.

(In contrast, there’s been a steady increase in the number of Biblical-origin names among the top boy names.)

Here’s the color-coded table — Biblical names are in the yellow cells, non-Biblical names are in the green cells, and several borderline names (which I counted as non-Biblical) are in the orange cells:

Popular girl names: Biblical vs. non-Biblical, from Nancy's Baby Names.
Popular girl names over time: Biblical (yellow) vs. non-Biblical. Click to enlarge.
  • Biblical names: Abigail, Anna, Betty (via Elizabeth), Chloe, Danielle, Deborah, Debra, Elizabeth, Hannah, Isabella (via Elizabeth), Janet, Jean, Joan, Judith, Judy, Julie, Lillian (via Elizabeth), Lisa (via Elizabeth), Lois, Marie, Marilyn, Mary, Mia (via Maria), Michelle, Nancy (via Anne), Rachel, Rebecca, Ruth, Sandra (via Alexander), Sarah, Sharon, Stephanie, Susan, Tammy (via Tamar/Tamara)
  • Non-Biblical names: Alexis, Alice, Alyssa, Amanda, Amber, Amelia, Amy, Angela, Ashley, Aubrey, Avery, Barbara, Brenda, Brianna, Brittany, Carol, Carolyn, Catherine, Charlotte, Christina, Christine, Crystal, Cynthia, Diane, Donna, Doris, Dorothy, Edna, Ella, Emily, Emma, Evelyn, Florence, Frances, Gladys, Grace, Harper, Heather, Helen, Irene, Jennifer, Joyce, Karen, Kathleen, Kayla, Kelly, Kimberly, Laura, Lauren, Linda, Lori, Louise, Madison, Margaret, Marjorie, Megan, Melissa, Mildred, Natalie, Nicole, Olivia, Pamela, Patricia, Rose, Shannon, Shirley, Sofia, Sophia, Taylor, Tiffany, Victoria, Virginia
  • Borderline names:
    • Ava (could be based on the Germanic root avi or the Biblical name Eve)
    • Jessica (literary invention, but Shakespeare may have based it on the Biblical name Iscah)
    • Samantha (possibly inspired by the Biblical name Samuel)

Again, feels pretty weird to put overtly Christian names like Christina and Christine in the non-Biblical category, but oh well.

Here are the year-by-year tallies:

Year Top 20 names
given to…
# Biblical # Non-Biblical
1914 31% of baby girls 6 (30%) 14 (70%)
1924 31% of baby girls 7 (35%) 13 (65%)
1934 32% of baby girls 9 (45%) 11 (55%)
1944 35% of baby girls 8 (40%) 12 (60%)
1954 34% of baby girls 9 (45%) 11 (55%)
1964 24% of baby girls 9 (45%) 11 (55%)
1974 24% of baby girls 8 (40%) 12 (60%)
1984 26% of baby girls 6 (30%) 14 (70%)
1994 19% of baby girls 6 (30%) 14 (70%)
2004 14% of baby girls 6 (30%) 14 (70%)
2014 12% of baby girls 5 (25%) 15 (75%)

Just like with the boy names, though, there’s a big difference between the 1914 and 2014 sample sizes — 31% and 12%. So let’s also look at the 2014 top 100, which covers 31% of female births.

By my count, last year’s top 100 girl names were about a quarter Biblical, three-quarters non-Biblical:

Biblical names (27) Non-Biblical/Borderline names (73)
Isabella (via Elizabeth), Mia (via Maria), Abigail, Elizabeth, Chloe, Addison (via Adam), Lillian (via Elizabeth), Hannah, Anna, Leah, Gabriella, Sadie (via Sarah), Sarah, Annabelle, Madelyn (via Magdalene), Lucy (via Lucius), Alexa (via Alexander), Genesis, Naomi, Eva, Lydia, Julia, Khloe, Madeline (via Magdalene), Alexandra, Gianna (via Joanna), Isabelle (via Elizabeth) Emma, Olivia, Sophia, Ava, Emily, Madison, Charlotte, Harper, Sofia, Avery, Amelia, Evelyn, Ella, Victoria, Aubrey, Grace, Zoey, Natalie, Brooklyn, Lily, Layla, Scarlett, Aria, Zoe, Samantha, Audrey, Ariana, Allison, Savannah, Arianna, Camila, Penelope, Claire, Aaliyah, Riley, Skylar, Nora, Hailey, Kaylee, Paisley, Kennedy, Ellie, Peyton, Caroline, Serenity, Aubree, Alexis, Nevaeh, Stella, Violet, Mackenzie, Bella, Autumn, Mila, Kylie, Maya, Piper, Alyssa, Taylor, Eleanor, Melanie, Faith, Katherine, Brianna, Ashley, Ruby, Sophie, London, Lauren, Alice, Vivian, Hadley, Jasmine

Faith, Grace, Angela, Nevaeh, Natalie…all technically non-Biblical.

27%-73% is remarkably similar to both 25%-75% (smaller 2014 sample) and 30%-70% (1914 sample).

So here’s the question of the day: If you had to choose all of your children’s names from either one group or the other — Biblical names or non-Biblical names — which group would you stick to, and why?

Most Popular Baby Names in Armenia, 2012

The most popular baby names in Armenia were announced way back in February, then updated in May. (The numbers below are from the more recent press release.)

According to the National Statistical Service, the country’s top names were Davit for boys and Nare for girls.

Here are Armenia’s top 48 girl names and top 48 boy names of 2012:

Baby Girl Names Baby Boy Names
1. Nare, 967 baby girls
2. Milena, 852
3. Mari, 772
4. Mane, 729
5. Annie, 591
6. Anahit, 575
7. Elen, 543
8. Anna, 474
9. Mariam, 442
10. Maria, 410
11. Merry, 391
12. Angelina, 377
13. Gayane, 345
14. Eva, 299
15. Lilit, 294
16. Susanna, 288
17. Sona, 275
18. Hasmik, 258
19. Viktoria, 249
20. Gohar, 237
21. Nataly, 197
22. Karine, 191
23. Yana, 181
24. Sofi, 175
25. Karina, 156
26. Ruzanna, 155
27. Lusine, 152
28. Arevik, 145
29. Liana, 140
30. Anush, 139
31. Marianna, 134
32. Syuzanna, 133
33. Tamara, 122
34. Diana, 121
35. Marina, 116
36. Syuzi, 116
37. Armine, 113
38. Elina, 112
39. Vika, 103
40. Astghik, 102
41. Nane, 100
42. Narine, 99
43. Svetlana, 98
44. Lily, 96
45. Seda, 96
46. Sofya, 95
47. Monika, 95
48. Sara, 94
1. Davit, 1,313 baby boys
2. Narek, 1,144
3. Gor, 808
4. Hayk, 673
5. Alex, 600
6. Erik, 599
7. Tigran, 541
8. Arman, 529
9. Samvel, 490
10. Arthur, 451
11. Alen, 440
12. Armen, 428
13. Aram, 414
14. Ashot, 401
15. Aren, 348
16. Gevorg, 343
17. Areg, 328
18. Sargise, 322
19. Vahe, 302
20. Gagik, 302
21. Arsen, 300
22. Hovhannes, 283
23. Levon, 282
24. Artyom, 270
25. Karen, 263
26. Miqayel, 231
27. Robert, 205
28. Vardan, 181
29. Mher, 177
30. Harutyun, 172
31. Suren, 171
32. Garik, 164
33. Grigor, 157
34. Mark, 153
35. Daniel, 146
36. Hakob, 145
37. Aleksandr, 142
38. Edgar, 140
39. Andranik, 135
40. Hamlet, 135
41. Raphael, 134
42. Manvel, 133
43. Ruben, 133
44. Sergey, 129
45. Vahan, 107
46. Artak, 106
47. Albert, 105
48. Eduard, 104

Why didn’t they just go to 50? We shall never know…

Sources: Nare, David most popular baby names in Armenia in 2012, The most frequently given names to the new-borns by sex [pdf]

The Baby Name Tammy

TammyLast week, two notable women named Tammy won elections. One was Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin, elected to the U.S. Senate. The other was Tammy Duckworth of Illinois, elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.

Do you think this could be enough to revive the baby name Tammy?

The name started popping up on the SSA’s baby name list in the 1930s, was in the top 1,000 by the late 1940s, and was extremely popular by the late 1950s:

  • 1961: 15,527 baby girls named Tammy [rank: 28th]
  • 1960: 14,311 baby girls named Tammy [rank: 31st]
  • 1959: 13,707 baby girls named Tammy [rank: 31st]
  • 1958: 9,981 baby girls named Tammy [rank: 44th]
  • 1957: 4,361 baby girls named Tammy [rank: 107th]
  • 1956: 261 baby girls named Tammy [rank: 583rd]
  • 1955: 192 baby girls named Tammy [rank: 677th]

What caused the surge in popularity? The 1957 movie Tammy and the Bachelor, and its memorable theme song “Tammy” [vid]. (The song was written by the same pair who created “Que Sera, Sera.”)

The film and song popularized not just the name Tammy, but a slew of other Tam-names as well, including Tambra, Tamela, Tamera, Tami, Tamie, Tammi, Tammie, Tamra, Tamara, and Tambrey (the real name of the film’s main character).

The name Tamre, which debuted in 1958, was the top debut name for baby girls that year.

The name Tammy stayed popular through the ’60s, thanks to two more Tammy films (1961 & 1963) and a short-lived TV series (1965-1966). It was one of the top ten baby girl names in the nation in 1964 and from 1966 to 1971. (Tammy Baldwin was born in 1962, Tammy Duckworth in 1968.)

After that, Tammy began sinking. It dropped out of the top 100 in 1981, out of the top 1,000 in 1992, and continues to fall every year:

  • 2011: 58 baby girls named Tammy
  • 2010: 69 baby girls named Tammy
  • 2009: 96 baby girls named Tammy
  • 2008: 120 baby girls named Tammy

Do you think the national coverage of Tammy Baldwin and Tammy Duckworth in 2012 could reverse this trend? (Even if just for a year?)

Baby Names (No Longer) Needed – Molly, Kaitlin, Joshua, Isabel

We’re batting .500 for March:

  • Elisa picked Kaitlin Isabella,
  • Teresa opted for Molly Brynn,
  • Sheryl chose Joshua Stephen, and
  • Erin selected Isabel Robin.

No word yet from Sarah, Tamara, Liz or Patience.

And, I always forget to mention this: Thank you to everyone who takes the time comment on the “Baby Name Needed” posts! Your suggestions and ideas are often far better than mine. :) You guys rock.

Baby Name Needed – Girl Name that Goes with Abel

A reader named Bonny writes:

We are already decided on a boys’ name, but just can’t come up with a good girl’s name. Our firstborn is Abel Zachary. We want a girls’ name that doesn’t clash with Abel. So far we like these girls’ names: Evangelina, Arabella, Amethyst, Isabelle, Olivia, River, Violet. We want something uncommon, but not overly weird. We are stumped and just can’t decide on a girl’s name we really love that fits well with Abel.

I like most of the names on Bonny’s shortlist, but I don’t think many of them fit well with Abel.

To me, Abel is simple, unassuming, obviously biblical, and slightly rural/old-fashioned.

Amethyst and River strike me as being exotic and modern (though I’m sure Amethyst was used occasionally during the Victorian era). Both are gender-neutral names, while Abel is definitively masculine. And I’m slightly concerned that an unusual noun-name could make people think of Abel as able the adjective…you never know.

I like Evangelina, Isabelle, Arabelle and Olivia a little more with Abel, but to me they still sound too formal, too cosmopolitan. I’m not fond of the way Isabelle and Arabelle nearly rhyme with Abel. Finally, Olivia and Isabelle can no longer be described as “uncommon” since becoming trendy during the 1990s.

I do think Violet and Abel make a nice pair, though. Other names that I think fit well with Abel include:

Helah (the “e” is long)
Selah (another long “e”)

Which of the names above do you like best with Abel? What other names would you suggest to Bonny?

Update – The baby is here! Scroll down to see what name Bonny chose…

Celebrity Baby Names – Dolly Rebecca Rose & Charlie Tamara Tulip

Actors Rebecca Romijn and Jerry O’Connell welcomed twin girls on December 28th.

The girls’ names are Dolly Rebecca Rose and Charlie Tamara Tulip.

Their first names are in honor of Dolly Parton and Jerry’s brother Charlie. Their second names come from mom and mom’s sister Tamara. I’m not sure if the flower names have any special meaning…but they do start with the same first letters as Rebecca and Tamara, which is cute.

Which name do you like best?

Source: People

How Do German Companies Use Name Data?

A reader recently told me that German companies have started using forenames to approximate the ages and origins of their web site visitors.

For example, a visitor named “Tamara” is most likely to be a 40-something from eastern Germany, according to name data.

Interesting, isn’t it? I wonder how accurate the approximations are.

The reader found this information in an issue of German science magazine bild der wissenschaft. I haven’t personally seen the source, but if you have and could tell me more, I’d love to hear from you.