How popular is the baby name Teresa in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Teresa and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Teresa.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Teresa

Number of Babies Named Teresa

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Teresa

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: Letter L

leatrice, actress, cinema, nameLooking for an uncommon girl name with a retro feel?

Here’s a list of rare female L-names associated with the earliest decades of cinema (1910s to 1940s).

And I’ve included links to popularity graphs for the names that have seen enough usage to appear in the SSA data.

*

Labela
Labela was a character played by actress Virginia Brissac in the short film Hawaiian Love (1913).

Laetitia
Laetitia Bonaparte was a character played by actress May Whitty in the film Conquest (1937).

Lahleet
Lahleet was a character played by actress Bessie Love in the film Tongues of Flame (1924).

Laissabeth
Laissabeth Powys was a character played by actress Una Venning in the film A Welsh Singer (1916).

Lala
Lala was a character name in multiple films, including A Soul Astray (short, 1914) and The Rustle of Silk (1923).

  • Usage of the baby name Lala.

Lali
Lali was a character name in multiple films, including The Translation of a Savage (1913) and Behold My Wife! (1920).

  • Usage of the baby name Lali.

Lalia
Lalia Fleming was a character played by actress Gerda Holmes in the short film The Strength of the Weak (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Lalia.

Laline
Laline Coxheim was a character played by actress Marie Walcamp in the short film The Mysterious Contragrav (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Laline.

Laloe
Laloe Berchmans was a character played by actress Julie Suedo in the film The Woman from China (1930).

Lamentina
Lamentina was a character played by actress Nancy Brown in the film Red Wagon (1933).

Lammchen
Emma “Lammchen” Pinneberg was a character played by actress Margaret Sullavan in the film Little Man, What Now? (1934). Lammchen means “little lamb” in German.

Laraine
Laraine Day was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1960s. She was born in Utah in 1920. Her birth name was La Raine Johnson.

Laramie
Laramie Winters was a character played by actress Ruth Terry in the film Man from Music Mountain (1943).

Lark
Lark Ingoldsby was a character played by actress Teresa Wright in the film Enchantment (1948).

  • Usage of the baby name Lark.

Lasca
Lasca was a character name in multiple films, including Lasca (1919) and Lasca of the Rio Grande (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Lasca.

Laska
Laska Winter was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1930s. She was born in Missouri in 1905.

Latona
Latona was a character played by actress Anna Demetrio in the film Call of the South Seas (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Latona.

Laurabelle
Laurabelle Ronson was a character played by actress Gloria DeHaven in the film The Thin Man Goes Home (1945).

Lauralee
Lauralee Curtis was a character played by actress Wendy Barrie in the film Wings Over Honolulu (1937).

Laurella
Laurella Consadine was a character played by actress Ricca Allen in the film The Power and the Glory (1918).

  • Usage of the baby name Laurella (which debuted in the data the year The Power and the Glory came out).

Lauretta
Lauretta was a character name in multiple films, including A Bad Egg (short, 1914) and I Was to Blame (1937).

Laurette
Laurette Taylor was an actress who appeared in films in the 1920s. She was born in New York in 1884. Her birth name was Loretta Cooney. Laurette was also a character played by actress Molly Lamont in the film Scared to Death (1947).

Laurine
Laurine was a character name in multiple films, including The Key to the Past (1915) and Expensive Husbands (1937).

Lavara
Lavara was a character played by actress Mae Clarke in the film Lady from Chungking (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Lavara.

Laverne
LaVerne LaPeer was a character played by actress Kathryn Keys in the short film Radio Runaround (1943).

Lavina
Lavina was a character name in multiple films, including Why Smith Left Home (1919) and Young Tom Edison (1940).

  • Usage of the baby name Lavina.

Lavita
Lavita was a character played by actress Marie Burke in the film After the Ball (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Lavita.

Lavolia
Lavolia was a character played by actress Etta McDaniel in the film Magnificent Brute (1936).

Leatrice
Leatrice Joy was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1950s. She was born in Louisiana in 1893. Leatrice Joy Gilbert (Leatrice Joy’s daughter) was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1940s. She was born in California in 1924.

Leda
Leda was a character name in multiple films, including The Worst Woman in Paris? (1933) and Cleopatra (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Leda.

Ledda
Ledda Perrin was a character played by actress Alyce Mills in the film Faint Perfume (1925).

Lelia
Lelia Dodson was a character played by actress Margaret Livingston in the film Lying Lips (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Lelia.

Lemona
Lemona Reighley was a character played by actress Alma Rubens in the film Reggie Mixes In (1916).

Lenie
Lenie Retief was a character played by actress Caroline Frances Cooke in the film De Voortrekkers (1916).

Lenita
Lenita Lane was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1950s. She was born in Pennsylvania in 1901.

  • Usage of the baby name Lenita.

Lenke
Lenke was a character played by actress Julanne Johnston in the film Prisoners (1929).

Leo
Leonore “Leo” Bewlay was a character played by actress Mary Astor in the film Enticement (1925).

  • Usage of the baby name Leo.

Leonie
Leonie was a character name in multiple films, including The Sword of Damocles (1920) and Safe in Hell (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Leonie.

Leonora
Leonora was a character name in multiple films, including Susan and God (1940) and The Girl Who Forgot (1940).

Leontine
Leontine Dranet was an actress who appeared in 2 films in the 1910s. Leontine was also a character name in multiple films, including The Closing Net (1915) and The Shielding Shadow (serial, 1916).

Leopoldine
Leopoldine was a character played by actress Luise Rainer in the film Escapade (1935).

Leota
Leota Long was a character played by actress Katherine DeMille in the film Banjo on My Knee (1936).

  • Usage of the baby name Leota.

Lescaboura
Lescaboura was a character name in multiple films, including So’s Your Old Man (1926) and You’re Telling Me! (1934).

Letitia
Letitia was a character name in multiple films, including Pretty Mrs. Smith (1915) and 52nd Street (1937).

Lettice
Lettice Musgrave was a character played by actress Vola Vale in the short film Harvest (1915).

Leva
Leva Lemaire was a character played by actress Barbara La Marr in the film Souls for Sale (1923).

  • Usage of the baby name Leva.

Levinnia
Levinnia was a character played by actress Louise Beavers in the film The Dark Horse (1932).

Levisa
Levisa Hatfield was a character played by actress Hope Emerson in the film Roseanna McCoy (1949).

Li Wanna
Li Wanna was a character played by actress Elena Verdugo in the film The Lost Tribe (1949).

Liane
Liane was a character name in multiple films, including Shadows of Paris (1924) and Parisian Life (1936).

  • Usage of the baby name Liane.

Lianne
Lianne Demarest was a character played by actress Mae Murray in the film Princess Virtue (1917).

  • Usage of the baby name Lianne.

Lida
Lida was a character name in multiple films, including Red and White Roses (short, 1913) and Atlantic Convoy (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Lida.

Liddy
Liddy was a character played by actress Bonita Granville in the film Silver Dollar (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Liddy.

Lihula
Lihula was a character played by actress Marie Walcamp in the short film Tribal War in the South Seas (1914).

Lil
Lil Vanderhoven was a character played by actress Marjorie Rambeau in the film Oh, What a Night! (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Lil.

Lilac
Lilac was a character played by actress Julanne Johnston in the film Twinkletoes (1926).

  • Usage of the baby name Lilac.

Lilas
Lilas Niles was a character played by actress Sarah Truax in the film Fool’s Gold (1919).

  • Usage of the baby name Lilas.

Lilaya
Lilaya was a character played by actress Mona Maris in the film The Man Called Back (1932).

Lilibelle
Lilibelle Bolton was a character played by actress Martha Raye in the film Navy Blues (1941).

Liliha
Queen Liliha was a character played by actress Florence Bates in the film Tahiti Nights (1944).

Lillo
Lillo was a character played by actress May Allison in the short film Lillo of the Sulu Seas (1916).

Lillums
Lillums was a character name in multiple films, including Harold Teen (1928) and Harold Teen (1934).

Lilongo
Lilongo was a character played by actress Nina Mae McKinney in the film Sanders of the River (1935).

Lilya
Lilya Vallon was an actress who appeared in 1 film in 1933.

  • Usage of the baby name Lilya.

Lilybeth
Lilybeth was a character played by actress Gladys Blake in the film Scared to Death (1947).

Linee
Linee Hayden was a character played by actress Alice Joyce in the short film The Cabaret Dancer (1914).

Linette
Linette was a character name in multiple films, including The Open Road (short, 1913) and The Man Who Reclaimed His Head (1934).

Linnie
Linnie was a character name in multiple films, including Thrown to the Lions (1916) and The Price of Pleasure (1925).

  • Usage of the baby name Linnie.

Lio
Lio Sha was a character played by actress Ressel Orla in the film Die Spinnen (1919 & 1920).

Lione
Lione Brune was a character played by actress Florence Short in the film A Man’s World (1918).

Liseben
Liseben was a character played by actress Gertrude McCoy in the short film The Workman’s Lesson (1912).

Lisetta
Lisetta was a character played by actress Natalie Kingston in the film Street Angel (1928).

Lispeth
Lispeth was a character played by actress Helen Gardner in the short film Vampire of the Desert (1913).

Lissa
Lissa Campbell was a character played by actress Margaret Lockwood in the film A Lady Surrenders (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Lissa.

Lita
Lita Grey was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1940s. She was born in California in 1908. Her birth name was Lillita MacMurray. Lita was also a character name in multiple films, including Bachelor Apartment (1931) and The Girl from Monterrey (1943).

  • Usage of the baby name Lita.

Liva
Liva Weel was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1950s. She was born in Denmark in 1897. Her birth name was Olivia Olsen.

  • Usage of the baby name Liva.

Livette
Livette was a character played by actress Simone Bourday in the film Roi de Camargue (1935).

Lizabeth
Lizabeth Anne was a character played by actress Mary Fuller in the short film The Heart of the Hills (1914).

Lizaveta
Lizaveta Ivanova was a character played by actress Yvonne Mitchell in the film The Queen of Spades (1949).

Lize
Lize was a character played by actress Sarah Padden in the film Wild Girl (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Lize.

Lizee
Lizee was a character played by actress Adele DeGarde in the film The Triumph of the Weak (1918).

Loana
Loana was a character played by actress Carole Landis in the film One Million B.C. (1940).

  • Usage of the baby name Loana.

Loey
Loey Tsing was a character played by actress Helen Jerome Eddy in the film The First Born (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Loey.

Lolah
Lolah was a character played by actress Fritzi Ridgeway in the film Prince of Diamonds (1930).

  • Usage of the baby name Lolah.

Lolaire
Lolaire was a character played by actress Evelyn Brent in the film The Shadow of the East (1924).

Lolano
Lolano was a character played by actress Mamo Clark in the film Air Devils (1938).

Lolette
Lolette was a character played by actress Rosemary Theby in the film One Year to Live (1925).

Lolly
Lolly was a character played by actress Joan Davis in the film Too Busy to Work (1939).

  • Usage of the baby name Lolly.

Lolomi
Lolomi was a character played by actress Enid Markey in the film The Captive God (1916).

Lona
Lona was a character played by actress Dorothy Lamour in the film Rainbow Island (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Lona.

Looloo
Looloo Blake was a character played by actress Lillian Harvey in the film My Weakness (1933).

Loris
Loris Lane was a character played by actress Josephine Dunn in the film Fascinating Youth (1926).

  • Usage of the baby name Loris.

Lorita
Lorita was a character played by actress Edith Borella in the short film As a Man Thinketh (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Lorita.

Lorna
Lorna Gray was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1950s. She was born in Michigan in 1917. Her birth name was Virginia Pound. Lorna was also a character name in multiple films, including Traffic in Souls (1913) and The Butterfly Girl (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Lorna.

Lorry
Lorry was a character name in multiple films, including Bed of Roses (1933) and Strange Faces (1938).

  • Usage of the baby name Lorry.

Loru
Loru was a character played by actress Nina Quartero in the film Isle of Escape (1930).

Lory
Lory James was a character played by actress Eileen Percy in the film East Side – West Side (1923).

  • Usage of the baby name Lory (which debuted in the data as a girl name the year East Side – West Side came out).

Lota
Lota was a character played by actress Kathleen Burke in the film Island of Lost Souls (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Lota.

Loti
Loti San was a character played by actress Bessie Eyton in the short film The Love of Loti San (1915).

Lotta
Lotta was a character name in multiple films, including One Thousand Dollars (1918) and Black Oxfords (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Lotta.

Lottice
Lottice Howell was an actress who appeared in films in the 1930s. She was born in Kentucky in 1897.

Lotti
Lotti Pelgram was a character played by actress Rita La Roy in the film Amateur Daddy (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Lotti.

Louella
Louella Parsons was a gossip columnist who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1960s. She was born in Illinois in 1881.

Louelle
Louelle Fenwick was a character played by actress Dorothy Christy in the film Forbidden Company (1932).

Louisiana
Louisiana Rogers was a character played by actress Vivian Martin in the film Louisiana (1919).

Loulie
Loulie was a character played by actress May Allison in the film The Secretary of Frivolous Affairs (1915).

Loulou
Loulou was a character name in multiple films, including Kiss Me Again (1925) and Breakfast at Sunrise (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Loulou.

Lou-scha-enya
Lou-Scha-Enya was an actress who appeared in 1 film in 1930. She was born in Oklahoma in 1906. Her birth name was Tessie Mobley.

Louvette
Louvette Corbeau was a character played by actress Paulette Goddard in the film North West Mounted Police (1940).

Lovey
Lovey was a character name in multiple films, including Love’s Greatest Mistake (1927) and Blondie Goes Latin (1941).

  • Usage of the baby name Lovey.

Lowizie
Lowizie Smith was a character played by actress Sarah Padden in the film Private Snuffy Smith (1942).

Loxi
Loxi Claiborne was a character played by actress Paulette Goddard in the film Reap the Wild Wind (1942).

  • Usage of the baby name Loxi.

Loyola
Loyola O’Connor was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Minnesota in 1868.

  • Usage of the baby name Loyola.

Loys
Loys Andres was a character played by actress Peggy Pearce in the film The Red-Haired Cupid (1918).

  • Usage of the baby name Loys.

Lu
Lu was a character name in multiple films, including The Good Fairy (1935) and Across the Sierras (1941).

  • Usage of the baby name Lu.

Luana
Luana Walters was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1950s. She was born in California in 1912. Luana Patten was an actress who appeared in films from the 1940s to the 1980s. She was born in California in 1938. Luana was also a character played by actress Dolores del Rio in the film Bird of Paradise (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Luana.

Luani
Luani was a character played by actress Burnu Acquanetta in the film Rhythm of the Islands (1943).

Lucette
Lucette was a character played by actress Bessie Eyton in the short film The Going of the White Swan (1914).

Luchia
Luchia Luff was a character played by actress Claire Du Brey in the film Ponjola (1923).

  • Usage of the baby name Luchia.

Lucienne
Lucienne was a character played by actress Merle Oberon in the film Berlin Express (1948).

Lucile
Lucile Watson was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1950s. She was born in Canada in 1879. Lucile Browne was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1950s. She was born in Tennessee in 1907. Lucile was also a character played by actress Marguerite Snow in the short film Lucile (1912).

  • Usage of the baby name Lucile.

Lucilla
Lucilla was a character played by actress Alice Joyce in the films The Green Goddess (1923) and The Green Goddess (1930).

Lucindy
Lucindy was a character played by actress Edna Murphy in the film Silver Comes Through (1927).

Lucita
Lucita was a character played by actress Ethel Wales in the film The Bonded Woman (1922).

  • Usage of the baby name Lucita.

Lucretia
Lucretia was a character name in multiple films, including Lucretia Lombard (1923) and The Flaming Frontier (1926).

Lucrezia
Lucrezia was a character name in multiple films, including Don Juan (1926) and Private Angelo (1949).

Ludivine
Ludivine Bucaille was a character played by actress Betty Balfour in the film Little Devil May Care (1928).

Luena
Luena Hagen was a character played by actress Billie Dove in the film Sensation Seekers (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Luena.

Luigia
Luigia was a character played by actress Jane Dryden in the film The Man Without Desire (1923).

Lule
Lule Warrenton was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Michigan in 1862.

Lulubelle
Lulubelle (and Lulu Belle) were character names in multiple films, including Cowboy and the Senorita (1944) and Lulu Belle (1948).

Lura
Lura Wood was a character played by actress Gertrude McCoy in the film Miriam Rozella (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Lura.

Lureen
Lureen was a character played by actress Cleo Moore in the film Congo Bill (1948).

  • Usage of the baby name Lureen.

Lurene
Lurene Tuttle was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1980s. She was born in Indiana in 1907.

  • Usage of the baby name Lurene.

Lurline
Lurline was a character played by actress Juanita Hansen in the film The Sea Flower (1918).

Lute
Lute Mae Sanders was a character played by actress Gladys George in the film Flamingo Road (1949).

Lutie
Lutie was a character played by actress Ruth Stonehouse in the short film The Fable of Lutie, the False Alarm (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Lutie.

Luya
Luya was a character played by actress Edith Roberts in the film Black Cargoes of the South Seas (1928).

Lya
Lya De Putti was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Austria-Hungary (now Slovakia) in 1897. Her birth name was Amalia Putti.

  • Usage of the baby name Lya.

Lycia
Lycia was a character played by actress Winifred Greenwood in the short film The Beggar Child (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Lycia.

Lyda
Lyda Marston was a character played by actress Alice Hollister in the short film The Scorpion’s Sting (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Lyda.

Lyddie
Lyddie was a character played by actress Dorothy Rowan in the film Far from the Madding Crowd (1915).

Lyle
Lyle Pennington was a character played by actress Kathryn McGuire in the film Children of the Ritz (1929).

  • Usage of the baby name Lyle.

Lynda
Lynda was a character played by actress Marcia Moore in the film The Grip of Jealousy (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Lynda.

Lynne
Lynne Evans was a character played by actress Virginia Brissac in the film Dressed to Kill (1941).

  • Usage of the baby name Lynne.

Lynnie
Lynnie Willis was a character played by actress Dorothy Mackaill in the film Twenty-One (1923).

  • Usage of the baby name Lynnie.

Lysbeth
Lysbeth was a character played by actress Manora Thew in the film The Homemaker (1919).

Lysette
Lysette DeJon was a character played by actress Ruth Clifford in the film The Storm Breaker (1925).

*

…Which of the above names do you like best?

Source: IMDb

Classics on the Decline: Rebecca, Carol, Susan

girl names falling out of fashion

In last week’s “lowest ever” boy names post, I mentioned that reader Caitlin had shared her research on downward-trending baby names with me recently. While many girl names hit relative lows in 2017, for instance…

  • Sarah, now ranked 62nd — lowest ranking since 1970.
  • Rachel, now ranked 195th — lowest ranking since 1960.
  • Melissa, now ranked 273rd — lowest ranking since 1949.

…a couple of the names on her list, Rebecca and Catherine, hit their “lowest ever” rankings last year. (Plus there was Katherine, a borderline case of a lowest-ever tie.)

So I set out to find other “lowest ever” girl names.

Many of the names I checked (like Clare, Lea, and Bridget) hit a low in 2017, but it wasn’t their all-time low. Many others (like Pauline, Sara, and Mary) hit a low recently, but not as recently as 2017. Still others (like Yvonne) had to be disqualified because, even though they hit their lowest ranking on record in 2017, they didn’t appear in the data for all 138 years (1880-2017)…an issue I didn’t encounter with any of the boy names.

In the end, I was able to add a dozen thirteen names to the list:

  • Ann. Ranked 1,023rd in 2017; peak was 28th in the 1930s.
  • Barbara. Ranked 908th in 2017; peak was 2nd in the 1930s/1940s.
  • Carol. Ranked 1,814th in 2017; peak was 4th in the 1940s.
  • Catherine. Ranked 198th in 2017; peak was 18th in the 1910s.
  • Celia. Ranked 857th in 2017; peak was 141st in the 1880s.
  • Cynthia. Ranked 637th in 2017; peak was 7th in the 1950s.
  • Elisabeth. Ranked 775th in 2017; peak was 286th in the 2000s.
  • Katherine. Ranked 105th in 2017 + 1938; peak 25th in the 1990s.
  • Kathleen. Ranked 871st in 2017; peak was 9th in the 1940s. (Late addition–thanks Kelly!)
  • Linda. Ranked 708th in 2017; peak was 1st in 1940s/1950s.
  • Priscilla. Ranked 527th in 2017; peak was 127th in the 1940s.
  • Rebecca. Ranked 216th in 2017; peak was 10th in the 1970s.
  • Rosa. Ranked 672nd in 2017; peak was 52nd in the 1880s.
  • Susan. Ranked 963rd in 2017; peak was 2nd in the 1950s/1960s.
  • Teresa. Ranked 720th in 2017; peak was 18th in the 1960s.
  • Tressa. Ranked 9242nd in 2017; peak was 761st in the 1960s.

That makes 15 (or 16, if you count Katherine). I certainly could have missed a few, though, so if you can think of a good candidate, please let me know in the comments and I’ll take a look.

Pop Culture Baby Name Game Results, 2016

Here are the results of Pop Culture Baby Name Game 2016!

As usual, the disclaimer: Some of the names below were already on the rise. Others may have been influenced by more than just the single pop culture person/event listed. I leave it up to you to judge the degree/nature of pop culture influence in each case.

On to the names…

Luna, +849

  • Up from 2,796 baby girls in 2015 to 3,645 in 2016.
  • 6th-highest raw-number increase on the girls’ list in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: celebrity baby Luna Simone, daughter of singer John Legend and model Chrissy Teigen.

Camila, +765

Greyson, +704

  • Up from 3,591 baby boys in 2015 to 4,295 in 2016.
  • 8th-highest raw-number increase on the boys’ list in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: celebrity baby Greyson Valor, son of reality TV star Jenni “JWoww” Farley.

Adonis, +443

Kehlani, +272

Wade, +232

  • Up from 553 baby boys in 2015 to 785 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Deadpool (2016).

Prince, +187

  • Up from 820 baby boys in 2015 to 1,007 in 2016.
  • The name Princess also saw a jump in usage: 268 baby girls in 2015 to 369 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the death of Prince.

Lyanna, +154

  • Up from 62 baby girls in 2015 to 216 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the TV show Game of Thrones.

Alessia, +130

Wilder, +122

  • Up from 215 baby boys in 2015 to 337 in 2016.
  • 9th-highest ranking increase on the boys’ list in 2016.
  • Wilder also saw higher usage among baby girls: 22 in 2015 to 38 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the death of Gene Wilder.

Canaan, +99

  • Up from 283 baby boys in 2015 to 382 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: son of Oprah Winfrey (she announced this name in late 2015).
    • According to a 2010 biography, Winfrey’s son’s legal first name was Vincent.

Cyrus, +91

  • Up from 631 baby boys in 2015 to 722 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the TV mini-series Roots (2016).

Creed, +78

Bowie, +77

  • Up from 53 baby boys in 2015 to 130 in 2016.
  • Bowie also saw higher usage among baby girls: 43 in 2015 to 75 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the death of David Bowie.

Muhammad, +77

  • Up from 881 baby boys in 2015 to 958 in 2016.
  • The name Muhammadali also saw a jump in usage: 12 baby boys in 2015 to 24 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the death of Muhammad Ali.

Ivanka, +74

  • Up from 37 baby girls in 2015 to 111 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: Trump’s daughter Ivanka.

Cohen, +68

  • Up from 1,017 baby boys in 2015 to 1,085 in 2016.
  • Cohen also saw higher usage among baby girls: 12 in 2015 to 17 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the death of Leonard Cohen.

Queen, +49

  • Up from 148 baby girls in 2015 to 197 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influences: the TV show Queen Sugar (2016-) and the movie Queen of Katwe (2016).

Melania, +41

  • Up from 90 baby girls in 2015 to 131 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: Trump’s wife Melania.

Moana, +38

  • Up from 18 baby girls in 2015 to 56 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Moana (2016).

Jupiter, +36

  • Up from 42 baby girls in 2015 to 78 in 2016.
  • Jupiter also saw higher usage among baby boys: 25 in 2015 to 41 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter.

Hillary, +34

Simone, +33

  • Up from 340 baby girls in 2015 to 373 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influences: Olympic gymnast Simone Biles and celebrity baby Luna Simone.

Doris, +32

  • Up from 85 baby girls in 2015 to 117 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Hello, My Name Is Doris (2016).

Dream, +30

  • Up from 98 baby _s in 2015 to 128 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: Kardashian baby Dream Renée.

Rio, +29

  • Up from 103 baby boys in 2015 to 132 in 2016.
  • Rio also saw higher usage among baby girls: 38 in 2015 to 61 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Malachi, +27

  • Up from 2,558 baby boys in 2015 to 2,585 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the TV mini-series Roots (2016).

Ali, +23

  • Up from 1,060 baby boys in 2015 to 1,083 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the death of Muhammad Ali.

Barron, +20

  • Up from 74 baby boys in 2015 to 94 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: Trump’s son Barron.

Miesha, +19

  • Up from 13 baby girls in 2015 to 32 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: MMA fighter Miesha Tate.

Onyx, +18

  • Up from 38 baby girls in 2015 to 56 in 2016.
  • Onyx saw an even higher jump in usage among baby boys: 118 in 2015 to 172 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: celebrity baby Onyx Solace, daughter of Alanis Morissette.

Francis, +17

  • Up from 619 baby boys in 2015 to 636 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Deadpool (2016).

Merrick, +17

  • Up from 191 baby boys in 2015 to 208 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: Judge Merrick Garland.

Ajax, +16

  • Up from 17 baby boys in 2015 to 33 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Deadpool (2016).

Juno, +13

  • Up from 86 baby girls in 2015 to 99 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter.

Keanu, +13

  • Up from 197 baby boys in 2015 to 210 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Keanu (2016).

Halsey, re-entered with 12

  • After an absence, returned to the list with 12 baby girls in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: singer Halsey (born Ashley Nicolette Frangipane).

Valor, +12

  • Up from 78 baby boys in 2015 to 90 in 2016.
  • Valor also saw higher usage among baby girls: 6 in 2015 to 14 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: celebrity baby Greyson Valor, son of reality TV star Jenni “JWoww” Farley.

Hamilton, +11

  • Up from 86 baby boys in 2015 to 97 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the Broadway musical Hamilton.

Sanders, +11

  • Up from 12 baby boys in 2015 to 23 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: presidential candidate Bernie Sanders.

Bernie, +10

  • Up from 11 baby boys in 2015 to 21 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: presidential candidate Bernie Sanders.

Omran, +10

  • Up from 7 baby boys in 2015 to 17 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: Syrian boy Omran Daqneesh.

Elle, +9

  • Up from 816 baby girls in 2015 to 825 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: singer Elle King.

Teresa, +9

  • Up from 426 baby girls in 2015 to 435 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: canonization of Mother Teresa.

Dak, re-entered with 8

  • After an absence, returned to the list with 8 baby boys in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: NFL player Rayne Dakota “Dak” Prescott.

Wrigley, +8

  • Up from 22 baby boys in 2015 to 30 in 2016.
  • Wrigley also saw higher usage among baby girls: 15 in 2015 to 18 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: Chicago Cubs’ World Series win.

Boomer, +7

  • Up from 5 baby boys in 2015 to 12 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: celebrity baby Boomer Robert, son of Michael Phelps.

Dory, re-entered with 6

  • After an absence, returned to the list with 6 baby girls in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Finding Dory (2016).

Maui, re-entered with 5

  • After an absence, returned to the list with 5 baby boys in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Moana (2016).

Wilson, +5

  • Up from 433 baby boys in 2015 to 438 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Deadpool (2016).

Sully, +4

  • Up from 17 baby boys in 2015 to 21 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: the movie Sully (2016).

Teyana, +3

  • Up from 47 baby girls in 2015 to 50 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: singer Teyana Taylor.

Draymond, +2

  • Up from 6 baby boys in 2015 to 8 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: NBA player Draymond Green.

Daya, +1

  • Up from 42 baby girls in 2015 to 43 in 2016.
  • Pop culture influence: singer Daya (born Grace Martine Tandon).

Names that went down in usage from 2015 to 2016:

Names not in the SSA data in either 2015 or 2016:

  • Angel Dust
  • Aroldis
  • Bison
  • Broncs
  • Cubby
  • Curiosity
  • Dopinder
  • Eleven
  • Emayatzy
  • E’myri
  • Esperanto
  • Hermine
  • Ingwen
  • Jikan
  • Jonbenet
  • Lorca
  • Kunta
  • Laremy
  • Linmanuel
  • Maga
  • MacGyver
  • Mountain
  • Moushumi
  • Ode
  • Phiona
  • Regé-Jean
  • Rykiel
  • Trump
  • Usain
  • Voltron
  • Zobrist

Some initial reactions…

I was surprised that Adonis and Wade jumped in usage as much as they did.

I was also surprised that Wrigley barely jumped at all in usage. Maybe “Wrigley” reminds too many people of gum?

usain bolt, race, 100m, rio, olympics
© 2016 Cameron Spencer/Getty

Where the heck is Usain? Why is Usain not in the data yet? Sure, track and field is relatively unpopular in the United States. Still, I thought Rio might do it — with the help of that viral photo of Usain Bolt cheekily grinning at the competition in the middle of that 100 meter sprint.

Finally, as a former ’80s kid, I did have my fingers crossed for Voltron. Oh well…

How about you? Did any of these rises/falls surprise you?

P.S. Some of the names from the 2015 Pop Culture Baby Name Game that have started/continued to do well: Adaline, Arlo, Bjorn, Bryshere, Finn, Furiosa, Gigi, Hakeem, Jedi, Joy, Kylo, Lagertha, Lucious, Margot, Mars, Rey, Saint, and Sullivan. Even more interesting is Atticus, which saw a drop in usage in 2016 after rising steadily for years. (Here’s more about Atticus and the Go Set a Watchman debacle.) The usage of Becky decreased as well — could Beyoncé’s song “Sorry” have anything to do with it?

The Rise of Risë (ree-sah)

rise stevens, carmen, opera, the met
Risë Stevens as Carmen

This one took me years to figure out.

The curious name Rise debuted in the Social Security Administration data in 1942:

  • 1944: 13 baby girls named Rise
  • 1943: 7 baby girls named Rise
  • 1942: 15 baby girls named Rise [debut]
  • 1941: unlisted

“Rise”? Huh.

Rise was the 4th-most-popular debut name that year, and not far behind (in 7th place) was the somewhat similar Risa:

  • 1944: 12 baby girls named Risa
  • 1943: 5 baby girls named Risa
  • 1942: 12 baby girls named Risa [debut]
  • 1941: unlisted

Later in the ’40s, names like Reesa and Rissa popped up. And in the ’50s, names like Riesa and Reisa appeared. So there was definitely a minor Ris– trend going on in the mid-20th century, with “Rise” being the unlikely top variant.

But because “Rise” is also a vocabulary word, I had no luck pinning down the source. (It’s ridiculously hard to research word-names on the internet. I’m still stumped on Memory and Treasure.) Eventually I gave up.

Years later, as I was grabbing an image for the Finesse post, the answer landed right in front of me in the form of a cigarette ad:

Risë Stevens, Camels cigarettes, advertisement, 1953
Risë Stevens in a Camels ad © LIFE 1953

The full-page advertisement for Camels from a 1953 issue of LIFE magazine featured a “lovely star of the Metropolitan Opera” named Risë Stevens. I knew right away that this glamorous-looking lady — and her umlaut! — was the solution to the “Rise” puzzle.

Mezzo-soprano Risë Stevens was born Risë Steenberg in New York City in 1913. Her first name is pronounced “REE-sah” or “REE-suh.” Here’s how she explained it:

“It’s Norwegian; it was my grandmother’s name and my great-grandmother’s name. In school I was called everything but Rise; I was called Rose; I was called Rise {rhyming with “eyes”}; I was called Risé {rhyming with “play”}; even Teresa. In school, it was terrible; I would have arguments with the teachers. I would say, ‘I should know how to pronounce my own name.'”

One source suggested that Risë is related to the Latin word risus, meaning “laughter.”

So what was an opera singer doing in an national advertising campaign? Shouldn’t those be reserved for Hollywood stars? Well, turns out she was a Hollywood star — at least for a time. She sang professionally from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s, but in the early 1940s she gave acting a shot.

Her first film, released in late 1941, was the musical The Chocolate Soldier. Notice how her umlaut was left off the movie poster:

chocolate soldier, musical, film, 1941, rise stevens

This film accounts for the 1942 debut of both “Rise” and the phonetic respelling Risa.

Risë Stevens ultimately left Hollywood and returned to the opera — and she managed to bring at least a portion of her movie audience with her:

“I probably would never have reached that vast public had I not done films,” she said. “At least, I won a lot of people over to opera.”

This explains why Risë Stevens, often called the greatest Carmen of her generation, was being featured in advertisements and on television talk shows more than a decade later. And why her unique name therefore saw peak usage in the 1950s.

If you want to know more about Risë (and hear her sing!) here’s a Risë Stevens Tribute video created by the National Endowment for the Arts.

P.S. Risë Stevens had a granddaughter named Marisa — a combination of the names of her grandmothers, Maria and Risë. Risë Stevens’ son told her that he went with the -a ending instead of the ending because he was “not going to put her through what you’ve been through.”

Sources:

Pop Culture Baby Name Game, 2016

pop culture baby name game, 2016

It’s December 2 — the doubly momentous day on which Britney Spears celebrates her birthday and on which we start another round of the annual Pop Culture Baby Name Game.

Which baby names will see significant movement on the charts in 2016 thanks to popular culture (TV, movies, music, sports, politics, products, current events, video games, etc.)? Below are some possibilities. Leave a comment with the names you’d add — and don’t forget to mention the pop culture influence.

  • Addison – Chicago Cubs winning season
  • Adonis – movie Creed (suggested by Becca)
  • Ajax – TV show Deadpool (suggested by Elizabeth)
  • Alessia – singer Alessia Cara (suggested by Ebony)
  • Ali – death of Muhammad Ali
  • Angel (f) – TV show Deadpool (suggested by Elizabeth)
  • Angel Dust – TV show Deadpool (suggested by Elizabeth)
  • Aroldis – Chicago Cubs winning season/World Series
  • Auli’i – movie Moana
  • Barron – son of president-elect Donald Trump (suggested by Andrea)
  • Bebe – singer Bleta “Bebe” Rexha (suggested by Ebony)
  • Bernie – presidential candidate Bernie Sanders (suggested by elbowin)
  • Bison – new national mammal & Dakota Access pipeline protests
  • Boomer – son of Michael Phelps
  • Bowie – musician David Bowie
  • Broncs – son of Mackenzie McKee (late suggestion by me)
  • Camila – singer Camila Cabello (suggested by Ebony)
  • Canaan – son of Oprah Winfrey
  • Chyna – pro-wrestler Chyna (late suggestion by me)
  • Clark – Chicago Cubs winning season
  • Cohen – death of Leonard Cohen
  • Creed – movie Creed (suggested by Julie and Becca)
  • Cub – Chicago Cubs winning season
  • Cubby – Chicago Cubs winning season
  • Cyrus – TV miniseries Roots
  • Curiosity – Mars rover (suggested by elbowin)
  • Dak – NFL player Rayne Dakota “Dak” Prescott (late suggestion by me)
  • Daya – singer Daya (suggested by Ebony)
  • Dexter – Chicago Cubs winning season/World Series
  • Dopinder – TV show Deadpool (suggested by Elizabeth)
  • Doris – movie Hello, My Name Is Doris
  • Dory – movie Finding Dory (suggested by Randi)
  • Draymond – NBA player Draymond Green (late suggestion by me)
  • Dream – latest Kardashian baby (late suggestion by me)
  • Eleven – TV show Stranger Things (late suggestion by me)
  • Elle – singer Elle King (suggested by Ebony)
  • Emayatzy – TV miniseries Roots
  • E’myri – TV miniseries Roots
  • Esperanto – number of speakers (suggested by elbowin)
  • Francis – TV show Deadpool (suggested by Elizabeth)
  • Greyson – son of JWoww
  • Halsey – singer Halsey (suggested by Ebony)
  • Hamilton – musical Hamilton
  • Harriet – Harriet Tubman, chosen to appear on $20 bill
  • Hermine – Hurricane Hermine (late suggestion by me)
  • Hillary – presidential candidate Hillary Clinton
  • Ingwen – Tsai Ing-wen, president of Taiwan (suggested by elbowin)
  • Ivanka – daughter of president-elect Donald Trump (suggested by elbowin)
  • Jikan – death of Leonard Cohen (suggested by elbowin)
  • Jonbenet – anniversary of the death of JonBenet Ramsey
  • Juno – NASA space probe
  • Jupiter – NASA space probe
  • Lorca – death of Leonard Cohen (suggested by elbowin)
  • Luna – daughter of John Legend & Chrissy Teigen
  • Keanu – Key & Peele movie Keanu
  • Kehlani – musician Kehlani (late suggestion by me)
  • Kizzy – TV miniseries Roots
  • Kunta – TV miniseries Roots
  • Laremy – NFL player Laremy Tunsil (late suggestion by me)
  • Linmanuel – actor/playwright Lin-Manuel Miranda (late suggestion by me)
  • Lyanna – TV show Game of Thrones
  • Maga – Trump hashtag #MAGA (late suggestion by me)
  • Maisa – Brazilian child actress Maisa da Silva Andrade (late suggestion by me)
  • Malachi – TV miniseries Roots
  • Maui – movie Moana
  • MacGyver – TV show MacGyver (late suggestion by me)
  • Melania – wife of president-elect Donald Trump (suggested by elbowin)
  • Merrick – judge Merrick Garland, former Supreme Court nominee (late suggestion by me)
  • Miesha – UFC fighter Miesha Tate (late suggestion by me)
  • Moana – movie Moana
  • Monica – Puerto Rican Olympian Monica Puig (I’m curious about the rankings in Puerto Rico specifically; Monica fell out of the top 100 in PR after 2002.)
  • Mountain – daughter of actress Jena Malone
  • Moushumi – TV show The Voice (late suggestion by me)
  • Mowgli – movie The Jungle Book
  • Muhammad – death of Muhammad Ali
  • Murray – Chicago Cubs winning season/World Series
  • Ode – daughter of actress Jena Malone
  • Omran – Syrian boy Omran Daqneesh
  • Onyx – daughter of Alanis Morissette
  • Phiona – movie Queen of Katwe
  • Paisley – death of Prince
  • Prince – death of Prince (suggested by elbowin)
  • Queen – TV show Queen Sugar & movie Queen of Katwe
  • Regé-Jean – TV miniseries Roots
  • Rihanna – singer Rihanna (suggested by Ebony)
  • Rio – location of the 2016 Summer Olympics
  • Rykiel – death of Sonia Rykiel (suggested by elbowin)
  • Sanders – presidential candidate Bernie Sanders
  • Simone – gymnast Simone Biles & daughter of John Legend & Chrissy Teigen
  • Solace – daughter of Alanis Morissette
  • Sully – movie Sully
  • Teresa – canonization of Mother Teresa
  • Teyana – musician Teyana Taylor (late suggestion by me)
  • Tiffany – daughter of president-elect Donald Trump (suggested by elbowin)
  • Trump – president-elect Donald Trump
  • Tulip – movie Storks
  • Usain – runner Usain Bolt (late suggestion by me)
  • Valor – son of JWoww
  • Vanessa – TV show Deadpool (suggested by Elizabeth)
  • Voltron – web TV show Voltron: Legendary Defender (late suggestion by me)
  • Wade – TV show Deadpool (suggested by Elizabeth)
  • Wilder – death of Gene Wilder (suggested by m4yb3_daijirou)
  • Wilson – TV show Deadpool (suggested by Elizabeth)
  • Wrigley – Chicago Cubs winning season
  • Zephyr – U.S. House of Rep. (NY) candidate Zephyr Teachout, who was endorsed by Bernie Sanders. (She was born in Washington state, where Zephyr is particularly popular.)
  • Zobrist – Chicago Cubs winning season/World Series

I’ll post the results next May, when the SSA releases the 2016 baby name data. If you don’t want to miss the results post, please subscribe!

Previous rounds of the Pop Culture Baby Name Game: 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011: #1 & #2, 2010.