How popular is the baby name Tess in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Tess and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Tess.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Tess

Number of Babies Named Tess

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Tess

Name Quotes #42 – Tucker, Tess, Shea

tucker, life, 1952

From the cover description of the June 2, 1952, issue of LIFE:

The birthday guest all done up for a party on this week’s cover is Second-Grader Tucker Burns, 7, of New York City.

(A female Tucker born in the mid-1940s? Interesting…)

From “10 facts about Tess of the d’Urbervilles” (pdf) at The Times:

Tess didn’t start out as Tess. Hardy often changed names when he was writing, and he tried out Love, Cis and Sue, using Woodrow as a surname, narrowing the name down to Rose-Mary Troublefield or Tess Woodrow before finally settling on Tess Durbeyfield.

From “Naming a Baby (or 2) When You’re Over 40” by Joslyn McIntyre at Nameberry.com:

But I’m now far too practical for whimsical names. I want to spare my kids the time wasted spelling their name slowly over the phone and correcting its pronunciation millions of times. So out the window went some of the iconoclastic names I loved, but which seemed difficult, along with two names I adored but couldn’t figure out how to spell in a way that would make their pronunciation obvious: CARE-iss and k’r-IN.

From “Why everyone started naming their kids Madison instead of Jennifer” by Meeri Kim in the Washington Post:

While some believed a central institution or figure had to be behind a skyrocketing trend — say, Kim Kardashian or Vogue magazine — researchers have discovered through a new Web-based experiment that doesn’t have to be the case. In fact, the study suggests that populations can come to a consensus about what’s cool and what’s not in a rapid, yet utterly spontaneous way.

From “Name change proves a mysterious and outdated process” by Molly Snyder at OnMilwaukee.com:

The process to change your name is surprisingly lengthy, pricey and arguably outdated. People fill out forms, pay a $168 filing fee (there is also a fee to obtain a new birth certificate once the name is legally granted), get assigned to a judge, schedule a hearing date with the court and take out a statement in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel or the Daily Reporter three weeks in a row declaring intent of name change.

News websites are not approved for legal name change declaration, but this does not mean they couldn’t be someday, according to Milwaukee County Clerk of Circuit Court John Barrett.

“The process is very old and it hasn’t been changed in a long time, but that’s not to say it couldn’t be,” says Barrett. “The Wisconsin legislature decides that. Someone would have to have an interest in that change and take the time to make the argument that we’re in a changing world and publications shouldn’t be limited to print.”

From “The latest trend in startup names? Regular old human names” (Dec. 2014) by Erin Griffith in Fortune:

If you work in startups, there’s a good chance you know Oscar. And Alfred. Benny, too. And don’t forget Lulu and Clara. These aren’t the prominent Silicon Valley people that techies know by first name (although those exist—think Marissa, Satya, Larry and Sergey, Zuck). Rather, Oscar, Alfred, Benny, Lulu and Clara are companies. The latest trend in startup names is regular old human names.

From “A teacher mispronouncing a student’s name can have a lasting impact” by Corey Mitchell at PBS.org:

For students, especially the children of immigrants or those who are English-language learners, a teacher who knows their name and can pronounce it correctly signals respect and marks a critical step in helping them adjust to school.

But for many ELLs, a mispronounced name is often the first of many slights they experience in classrooms; they’re already unlikely to see educators who are like them, teachers who speak their language, or a curriculum that reflects their culture.

“If they’re encountering teachers who are not taking the time to learn their name or don’t validate who they are, it starts to create this wall,” said Rita (‘ree-the’) Kohli, an assistant professor in the graduate school of education at the University of California, Riverside.

It can also hinder academic progress.

From the NPS biography of John Quincy Adams (1767-1848):

Born on July 11, 1767 in Braintree, Massachusetts, he was the son of two fervent revolutionary patriots, John and Abigail Adams, whose ancestors had lived in New England for five generations. Abigail gave birth to her son two days before her prominent grandfather, Colonel John Quincy, died so the boy was named John Quincy Adams in his honor.

(Quincy, Massachusetts, was also named after Colonel John Quincy.)

And finally, from “How Many Mets Fans Name Their Babies ‘Shea’?” by Andrew Beaton in the Wall Street Journal:

You’re not a real Mets fan unless you name your kid Shea.

For more quotes, check out the name quotes category.


Top Names in the Netherlands, Early 2016

According to the SVB, the top baby names in the Netherlands during the first half of 2016 (January to June) were Julia and Sem:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Julia (326 baby girls, Jan. to June)
2. Sophie
3. Anna
4. Tess
5. Emma
1. Sem (330 baby boys, Jan. to June)
2. Noah
3. Daan
4. Milan
5. Max

The #1 baby names of 2015, Emma and Liam, aren’t doing too well so far this year.

Source: Sem and Julia top the list of most popular Dutch baby names

Popular Baby Names in The Netherlands, 2013

The Netherlands’ top baby names of 2013 were announced a little while ago.

According to data from the Sociale Verzekeringsbank (SVB), the country’s most popular baby names last year were Tess and Sem.

Here are The Netherlands’ top 20 girl names and top 20 boy names of 2013:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Tess
2. Sophie
3. Julia
4. Emma
5. Lisa
6. Fenna
7. Mila
8. Sara
9. Lotte
10. Zoe
11. Eva
12. Anna
13. Fleur
14. Isa
15. Lynn
16. Evi
17. Lieke
18. Saar
19. Noa
20. Sanne
1. Sem
2. Levi
3. Bram
4. Daan
5. Finn
6. Milan
7. Lucas
8. Luuk
9. Jesse
10. Jayden
11. Tim
12. Thomas
13. Thijs
14. Noah
15. Julian
16. Ruben
17. Liam
18. Lars
19. Stijn
20. Sam

The top names of 2012? Emma and Daan, both of which fell to 4th place last year.

Speaking of falling, Jayden continues to sink — 9th to 10th this time. (Jayden is also losing steam in the U.S.)

Source: Sociale Verzekeringsbank (via Tess en Sem zijn de populairste babynamen van 2013!)

Most Popular Baby Names in the Netherlands, 2012

The most popular baby names in the Netherlands were announced a few days ago.

According to the Sociale Verzekeringsbank (SVB), the top names in the Netherlands are Daan for boys and Emma for girls.

Here are the top 20 girl names and boy names of 2012:

Baby Girl Names Baby Boy Names
1. Emma
2. Sophie
3. Julia
4. Anna
5. Lisa
6. Isa
7. Eva
8. Saar
9. Lotte
10. Tess
11. Lynn
12. Fleur
13. Sara
14. Lieke
15. Noa
16. Fenna
17. Sarah
18. Mila
19. Sanne
20. Roos
1. Daan
2. Bram
3. Sem
4. Lucas
5. Milan
6. Levi
7. Luuk
8. Thijs
9. Jayden
10. Tim
11. Finn
12. Stijn
13. Thomas
14. Lars
15. Ruben
16. Jesse
17. Noah
18. Julian
19. Max
20. Liam

Quite short overall, aren’t they?

Jayden, now 9th, was 7th in 2011. It was 5th in 2010.

Here are a few more facts about the top 20, shamelessly stolen from Maarten Van Der Meer of Vernoeming.nl:

  • Big gainers are Bram (up from 16 to 2), Thijs (up from 14 to 8) and Anna (up from 10 to 4)
  • Newbies for boys are Noah and Max, for girls are Fenna and Mila.
  • Dropouts for boys are Sven and Mees, for girls are Maud and Jasmijn.

Sources: Daan en Emma zijn de populairste voornamen van 2012 – Bram, Thijs en Anna grootste stijgers, De populairste kindernamen van 2012 – SVB

Baby Name Needed – Girl Name for Saylor’s Sister

A reader named Michelle has a son named Saylor Dorian. She’s expecting a baby girl in May and would like some name suggestions. She says:

We originally picked shiloh for a girl but we aren’t liking how popular it’s getting [due to a celebrity finding it first..grrr] we want a unique name that’s still ‘easy on the ears’ as in easy to get used to. I try to stay away from the too feminine popular vowel names like ava, bella, etc… though we like them we don’t want a trendy name like piper, stella, etc…

We are currently tossing around names like vega, remy…. though what i loved about shiloh was that O ending.. but we are open to whatever.

First let’s try to come up some more o-endings. How about:

Callisto
Calypso
Clio
Flo (Flora/Florence)
Jo (Josie/Josephine)
Juno
Leo (Leona)
Margot
Marlow
Meadow
Mo (Maureen)
Willow

And here are some other names that came to mind:

Audra
Briar
Darcy
Dylan
Emery
Fiona
Gillian
Greer
Heidi
Ione
Jaya
Lotus
Lyra
Mina
Morgan
Nadia
Naomi
Nova
Phoebe
Rory
Tess
Violet
Vita
Zillah

Which of the above do you like best for Saylor’s sister? What other girl names would you suggest to Michelle?

Baby Name Needed – Girl Name for Maeve’s Sister

A reader named Kelly is expecting her second daughter in May, and she’d appreciate a few name suggestions. She writes:

Our first daughter, Maeve, was named really easily, and we grow to love the name more and more. However, we are having an exceptionally difficult time finding a second girl’s name that we like as much. I especially like Gaelic/Celtic names, but am willing to consider other options as well.

Here are some names that I think could work with Maeve:

Beatrix
Bevin
Blythe
Bree/Brígh
Bridget
Brynn
Caitlin
Carys
Chloe
Clio
Darcy
Deirdre
Eileen
Fiona
Freya
Gemma
Greta
Gwen
Hazel
Iona
Isla*
Ivy
Lorna
Lucy
Lyra
Miriam
Moira
Nora
Oona
Opal
Orla/Orlagh
Phoebe
Piper
Quinn
Rhona
Riona
Stella
Sylvie
Tamar
Tatum
Tegan
Tess
Tirzah
Zelda

*Pronounced EYE-la, but happens to looks just like the Spanish word for island, isla, pronounced EES-la.

Which of the above do you like best for Maeve’s little sister? What other names would you suggest to Kelly?

Baby Name Needed – Girl Name for Edie’s Sister

A reader named Andrea is expecting her second daughter in May and she’d appreciate some name suggestions. Here’s what she writes:

My husband and I love unusual names that have a little bit of a retro feel (my first daughter is Edie). We’ve been trying to think of something fun and different but still feminine. A few we like: Camilla, Lina, Romi, Gia, Neve and Leigh.

Here are some other names I think they might like:

Beatrix
Bettina
Blythe
Celia
Colette
Cora
Daphne
Della
Fern
Flora
Gemma
Hazel
Iola
Iris
Isla
Jill
Kate
Lida
Livia
Louise
Lucy
Mabel
Martha
Mina
Mona
Nelle
Nessa
Nina
Odette
Pearl
Pia
Rita
Rose
Ruby
Sabina
Sally
Stella
Sylvie
Thea
Tilda
Tess
Wendy
Willa
Winnie

Which of the above do you like best with Edie? What other names would you suggest to Andrea?