How popular is the baby name Thomas in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Thomas and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Thomas.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Thomas

Number of Babies Named Thomas

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Thomas

Popular Baby Names in Jersey, 2014-2016

jersey, orgueil, goreyAccording to the States of Jersey Child Health System, the most popular baby names on the island of Jersey (the largest of the Channel Islands in the English Channel) from 2014 to 2016 were Emily and Oliver.

Here are Jersey’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2014-2016:

Girl Names
1. Emily
2. Mia
3. Daisy
4. Olivia
5. Ava (tie)
5. Isabella (tie)
7. Freya
8. Amelia (3-way tie)
8. Grace (3-way tie)
8. Jessica (3-way tie)

Boy Names
1. Oliver
2. Jack
3. Ethan (3-way tie)
3. James (3-way tie)
3. Thomas (3-way tie)
6. Alexander (tie)
6. Charlie (tie)
8. Harry (4-way tie)
8. Leo (4-way tie)
8. Theo (4-way tie)
8. William (4-way tie)

Roughly 1,000 babies are born on the island per year, so these rankings account for about 3,000 babies overall.

Here’s some information on historically popular names in Jersey. The current top names are English names, but only because the island switched to speaking English relatively recently. For hundreds of years the islanders spoke Norman languages (French and/or Jèrriais, the local dialect) so the top names would have been French.

Sources: Jersey’s most popular baby names revealed, Health Profile for Jersey 2016, Island language in a sea of change


Name Quotes #48 – Tasha, Tiberius, Mi Mi

Time for more name-related quotes!

From a recent E! Online interview with Jordan Peele [vid], who spoke about choosing a baby name:

We definitely want pick a name that has a certain positivity that will counter this barbaric, negative time that we’re in right now.

From the 2008 New York Times obituary of illustrator/author Tasha Tudor:

Starling Burgess, who later legally changed both her names to Tasha Tudor, was born in Boston to well-connected but not wealthy parents. Her mother, Rosamond Tudor, was a portrait painter, and her father, William Starling Burgess, was a yacht and airplane designer who collaborated with Buckminster Fuller. […] She was originally nicknamed Natasha by her father, after Tolstoy’s heroine in “War and Peace.” This was shortened to Tasha. After her parents divorced when she was 9, Ms. Tudor adopted her mother’s last name.

(Her four kids were named Seth, Bethany, Thomas, and Efner (female). One of Tudor’s books was called Edgar Allan Crow (1953).)

On the new scientific name of Australia’s “Blue Bastard” fish:

Queensland Museum scientist Jeff Johnson, who identified the species from photos taken last year by a Weipa fisherman, has formally christened it Plectorhinchus caeruleonothus – a direct Latin translation of the colloquial name anglers bestowed on a fish famously difficult to land.

Caeruleo is blue and nothus is bastard. That was the origin of the name applied by fishermen for many years and I thought, why should I argue with that? It seemed like a perfect name [to] me,” Johnson told Guardian Australia.

“I wondered what the reviewers of the paper would say about it but they both agreed it was quintessentially Australian and we should go ahead.”

From the book My Life as a List: 207 Things about My (Bronx) Childhood (1999) by Linda Rosenkrantz (of Nameberry!):

Before I was born, my mother had decided to name me either Laurel or Lydia, names that appealed to her artistic temperament. But then somehow, while under the scrim of anesthesia, she was convinced by my father’s sisters to make me a lackluster Ruth, in honor of their recently deceased mother, Rose. And so my birth certificate read Ruth Leila, a name I was never, ever called by my mother, either of my father’s sisters or anyone else.

(Here’s more in Linda’s post The Story of How I Got Hooked on Names.)

On the names of the Mordvins, an indigenous group in Russia:

While walking along some river bank, not far from the Volga line, we might encounter some pleasant people called Kvedor, Markva, Valdonya and Nekhot and not realise that in Russian they would be Fyodor, Marfa, Svetlana and Mefody aka Theodore, Martha, Svetlana and Methodius.

This sort of phenomenon happens because of the Finno-Ugric special phonetic and secret lore. Any sound which is not familiar to their native tongue will be changed and adapted to suit the native tastes.

From an article in the Tampa Bay Times about transgender name changes:

[E]arlier this year in Augusta, Ga., Superior Court Judge J. David Roper declined to change the name of a college student from Rebeccah Elizabeth to Rowan Elijah Feldhaus.

“I don’t know anybody named Elijah who’s female,” the judge said, according to a court transcript. “I’m not going to do that. I’ve never heard of that. And I know who Elijah was, one of the greatest men who ever lived.”

Months later, he ruled similarly in the case of a transgender man who wanted to legally become Andrew Baumert, the name by which he said everyone already knew him. The judge refused. “My policy has been that I will not change a name from an obviously female to an obviously male name, and vice versa,” he said.

NPR writer Lateefah Torrence on choosing a baby name:

Having grown up in a working-class world, Frank is sensitive to names that he finds “pretentious” while as the outsider black kid, I worry about names that sound “too white.” I must admit that I have mostly rolled my eyes at his unease with my never-ending list of suggestions from world mythology and literature. He suggests Molly; I counter with Aziza. He brings William to the table; I suggest Tiberius.

(Lateefah was also featured in last month’s quote post.)

From a 1958 article in The Atlantic on Burmese Names by Mi Mi Khaing:

One or more of a Burmese child’s names is almost certain to show the day on which he was born–a survival from our belief that human destiny is linked with the stars. Certain letters of the alphabet are ascribed to each day, so that a “Thursday’s child” would have one name beginning with our P, B, or M.

Burmese is a monosyllabic language, and each part of our names is an actual word that means something, or even several things, depending on how it is pronounced. Thus I am “Little Mother” (Mi Mi) “Branch of the Tree” (Khaing) (though “khaing” can also mean “firm”) […] [a] merchant I know was aptly named “Surmounting a Hundred Thousand,” while the Rector of Rangoon University, Dr. Htin Aung, is “Distinguished and Successful.”

Being so handsomely named is not embarrassing, however, because we become so used to our names, and those of our friends, that we only think of the person and remember their names by their sound.

Popular Baby Names in Oxfordshire, 2016

According to data released yesterday by Oxfordshire County Council, the most popular baby names in Oxfordshire, England, in 2016 were Lily and Jack.

Here are Oxfordshire’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Lily
2. Amelia
3. Olivia
4. Isla
5. Emily
6. Ava
7. Sophia
8. Evie
9. Isabella
10. Sophie

Boy Names
1. Jack
2. Henry
3. Harry
4. George
5. Oliver
6. Joshua
7. Thomas
8. William
9. Samuel
10. James

Notably, Jack wasn’t even in the top 10 in 2015.

Source: Jack and Lily top the list of Oxfordshire most popular baby names in 2016

Popular Baby Names in Victoria, 2016

According to data released on January 11th by the Victorian Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, the most popular baby names in Victoria, Australia, in 2016 were Charlotte and Oliver.

Here are Victoria’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Charlotte, 453 baby girls
2. Olivia, 413
3. Mia, 364
4. Amelia, 355
5. Ava, 324
6. Isla, 323
7. Zoe, 304
8. Evie, 301
9. Grace, 278
10. Chloe, 273

Boy Names
1. Oliver, 516 baby boys
2. Jack, 435
3. William, 405
4. Noah, 373
5. James, 333
6. Ethan, 325
7. Thomas, 320
8. Max, 282
9. Mason, 263
10. Alexander, 262

Charlotte replaces Olivia as the #1 name for girls. In the girls’ top 10, Isla and Grace replace Sophie and Emily.

In the boys’ top 10, Mason and Alexander replace Lucas and Charlie.

Here are the 2015 rankings.

Source: Search popular names – Births, Deaths & Marriages Victoria, The most popular baby names in Victoria for 2016

Popular Baby Names in New Brunswick, 2016

According to preliminary data released on January 10th by New Brunswick’s Vital Statistics Office, the most popular baby names in the Canadian province in 2016 were Emma and Liam…I think.

See, the province published the top names in paragraph format, and without rankings. So I can only assume that the names were listed in order of popularity.

With that in mind, here’s my guess at New Brunswick’s projected top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Emma
2. Olivia
3. Charlotte
4. Sophia
5. Ellie
6. Mia
7. Evelyn
8. Anna
9. Amelia
10. Lily

Boy Names
1. Liam
2. Jacob
3. William
4. Thomas
5. Noah
6. Benjamin
7. Samuel
8. Jack
9. Owen
10. Mason

The top boys’ names also included Jaxon, Jackson, and Jaxson — all three — plus both Oliver and Olivier.

Source: New Brunswick’s birth numbers and top baby names for 2016

Popular Baby Names in ACT, 2016

According to data released recently by the ACT government, the most popular baby names in Canberra in 2016 were Charlotte and William.

Here are the Australian Capital Territory’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Charlotte
2. Amelia
3. Ava
4. Zoe
5. Grace
6. Evelyn
7. Mia
8. Abigail
9. Audrey
10. Lily

Boy Names
1. William
2. Lachlan
3. Thomas
4. Jack
5. Oliver
6. Liam
7. James
8. Alexander
9. Leo
10. Ethan

The two #1 names are the same as they were in 2015.

In the girls’ top ten, Evelyn, Abigail, Audrey and Lily replace Olivia (the former #2 name), Sophie, Chloe, and Emily.

In the boys’ top 10, Liam, Leo, and Ethan replace Henry, Charlie and Oscar.

For more Australia-specific baby name rankings, check out the Australia & New Zealand name rankings subcategory.

Source: Charlotte and William: Canberra’s top baby names for 2016

Popular Baby Names in PEI, 2016

According to provisional data released yesterday by Prince Edward Island’s Vital Statistics, the most popular baby names on the island in 2016 were Olivia and William.

Here are PEI’s projected top 10 girl names and top 10+ boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Olivia, 10 baby girls
2. Ellie, 8 (tie)
3. Charlotte, 8 (tie)
4. Harper, 7
5. Sophia, 6 (6-way tie)
6. Ivy, 6 (6-way tie)
7. Sadie, 6 (6-way tie)
8. Abigail, 6 (6-way tie)
9. Chloe, 6 (6-way tie)
10. Kylie, 6 (6-way tie)

Boy Names
1. William, 13 baby boys
2. Oliver, 12
3. Emmett, 11
4. Jack, 10 (tie)
5. Hudson, 10 (tie)
6. Ethan, 9
7. Wyatt, 7 (5-way tie)
8. Jacob, 7 (5-way tie)
9. Liam, 7 (5-way tie)
10. Hunter, 7 (5-way tie)
11. Thomas, 7 (5-way tie)

On the girls’ list, Olivia replaces the 5-way tie (Charlotte, Emily, Emma, Leah, and Sadie) that held the top spot in 2015. On the boys’ list, William replaces former #1 name Oliver.

This data covers Prince Edward Island births through December 21.

Source: Here are P.E.I.’s top baby names in 2016