How popular is the baby name Tycho in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Tycho and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Tycho.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Tycho

Number of Babies Named Tycho

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Tycho

The Last Intellectual to Latinize His Name?

Rudolf Clausius, originally Rudolf GottliebGerman physicist and mathematician Rudolf Clausius (1822-1888) was one of the founders of the science of thermodynamics.

Another interesting thing about Rudolf Clausius? He was born Rudolf Gottlieb.

I couldn’t find a concrete explanation for the name change, but I did find this in a college physics book: “Born with the name Rudolf Gottlieb, he adopted the classical name of Clausius, which was a popular thing to do in his time.”

(Clausius is based on the Latin clausus, meaning “closed, shut off.” Some sources say Clausius is an alternate name for Janus, the Ancient Roman god of beginnings and endings.)

Yes, many historical European scholars/artists did adopt Latinized names. Astronomer Tycho Brahe was born Tyge Ottesen Brahe. Artist Jheronimus (Hieronymus) Bosch was born Jeroen van Aken. Violin maker Antonius Stradivarius was born Antonio Stradivari. Map maker Gerardus Mercator was born Gerard de Cremer.

But these folks lived during the 1400s, 1500s and 1600s. It was trendy for Renaissance thinkers, who embraced Classical philosophies and attitudes, to Latinize their names. (Wikipedia has a long list of Latinized names coined during the Renaissance if you want more examples.)

Rudolf Clausius, on the other hand, lived during the 1800s. I can’t think of any other public figure who adopted a Latinized name as late as the mid-19th century.

Was Rudolf Clausius the last European intellectual to Latinize his name? Or do other outliers exist?

(At first I thought Carl Linnæus (1707-1778) might fit the bill, but his surname was the legitimate family name, coined by his father Nils before Carl was born. It’s based on the Småland dialect word “linn,” meaning “linden tree,” in reference to a stately linden tree on the family property.)

Sources:


Names Collected in the Czech Republic

Earlier this month, husband and I spent a couple of weeks in Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic.

old town, prague
Old Town Square, Prague

Here are some of the names we spotted:

Wenceslas

Our hotel was located in Wenceslas Square, which was named in honor of Duke of Bohemia Wenceslas I (907-935).

His name is a Latinized form of the Slavic name Veceslav, which is made up of the Old Slavic words veche, meaning “more, greater,” and slava, meaning “glory, fame.” (The name Václav is a contracted form of Veceslav.)

Mikulas

We didn’t spend much time checking out Wenceslas Square (which was mainly for shopping) but did hang out a lot in Old Town Square (which was more historical). One of the big attractions there is the astronomical clock:

Astronomical Clock, Old Town Square, Prague
Astronomical Clock in Old Town Square, Prague

The oldest part of the clock was created by clockmaker Mikuláš of Kadaň in 1410, making this the third-oldest astronomical clock in the world (and the oldest one still working).

The name Mikuláš is simply the Czech form of Nicholas, which can be traced back to the Greek words nike, meaning “victory,” and laos, meaning “people.”

Tyge & Tycho

Also in Old Town is a Gothic church called the Church of Mother of God before Týn. (The church is in the center of that top photo of Old Town Square.)

Danish nobleman and astronomer Tycho Brahe (1546-1601), who relocated to Bohemia toward the end of his life, is buried here. Tycho’s birth name was Tyge (pron. tee-geh), but he Latinized it to Tycho (pron. tee-ko) as a teenager.

According to the site Nordic Names, Tyge is a form of Tyki, which is the Danish form of Týki, which has several possible derivations. Tycho, on the other hand, is based on the Greek word tyche, which means “luck.”

Karel & Deniska

A short walk from Old Town Square is the Vltava river. From the early 1400s until the mid-1800s, the only way to cross the Vltava was the Karlův most (Charles Bridge; literally, “Karel’s bridge”) which was named in honor of 14th-century King Charles IV.

A gold-colored cross on the bridge parapet marks the spot where, in 1393, St. John of Nepomuk was thrown into the river and drowned. Behind the cross decorative railing on which people like to put love locks:

Love Locks on Charles Bridge, Prague
Charles Bridge, Prague

A couple of the locks:

Love locks on Charles Bridge, Prague
Love locks on Charles Bridge, Prague

I don’t know about the origins of Buka and Makc, but Deniska is a diminutive of Denisa, the feminine form of Denis, which comes from Dionysius, which is based on the name of the Greek god Dionysus, whose name is made up of elements referring to Zeus (dios) and the legendary Mount Nysa.

Dalibor

In that photo with the bridge with the railing, there’s a cluster of spires off in the distance. That’s the Prague Castle complex, which includes the Old Royal Palace, St. Vitus Cathedral, St. George’s Basilica, Rosenberg Palace, and Daliborka Tower.

Daliborka Tower, a former prison, was named after early prisoner Dalibor of Kozojedy (d. 1498). According to a legend that arose after his death, Dalibor learned to play the fiddle during his imprisonment and “people came from far and wide and listened, enraptured, to his soul-stirring playing.”

But an informational sign inside Daliborka debunks this myth:

The reality of Dalibor’s musical talent was, however, quite different: “the fiddle” was a nickname for an instrument of torture, a sort of rack on which the convicted man was stretched till […] the victim began “to fiddle” (change his tune, confess).”

Torture devices inside Daliborka Tower, Prague
Torture devices inside Daliborka Tower, Prague

The name Dalibor is made up of the Old Slavic words daleko, meaning “far, distance,” and bor meaning “war, fight.” (Daliborka is also the feminine form of the name.)

Svatopluk

Getting back to the river…one of the other bridges over the Vltava is the art deco Svatopluk Čech Bridge, named after Czech writer Svatopluk Čech (1846-1908).

Svatopluk Bridge, Prague
Svatopluk Bridge, Prague

The name Svatopluk is made up of the Old Slavic words svetu, meaning “blessed, holy,” and pulku, meaning “people, folk.”

Avigdor

You guys know I love graveyards, but sadly I didn’t get a chance to see Prague’s famous Old Jewish Cemetery. (We walked by it a few times, but always on our way somewhere else.)

I do remember reading, though, that the oldest stone there belongs to a rabbi named Avigdor Kara (d. 1439). The name Avigdor may be based on the phrase Avi Gedor (I Chron. 4.18), which means “father of Gedor,” with the name Gedor meaning “wall” or “fence.”

Now let’s wrap things up with this gratuitous shot of St. Vitus Cathedral:

St. Vitus Cathedral, Prague
St. Vitus Cathedral, Prague

Have you ever been to the Czech Republic? Do you remember seeing/hearing any interesting names while there?

Sources:

  • Behind the Name
  • Cohn, Rella Israly. Yiddish Given Names: A Lexicon. Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press, 2008.
  • Thoren, Victor E., John Robert Christianson. The Lord of Uraniborg: A Biography of Tycho Brahe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990.

List of Interesting Names

The profiles of famous people at Biography.com are sorted into groups like “Barnard College Alumni,” “Epileptics,” “Olympic Opening Ceremony Performers,” “Sagittarians,” and “U.S. Vice Presidents.”

So I was very curious when I noticed a group simply called “Names We Like.”

Here are the 23 people on that list:

  • Bella Abzug (b. 1920) activist, lawyer
  • Tycho Brahe (b. 1546) astronomer
  • Archibald Butt (b. 1865) military leader
  • Hoagy Carmichael (b. 1899) songwriter
  • Hawley Crippen (b. 1862) murderer, doctor
  • Mullah Dadullah (b. 1966) military leader
  • Nigel Dempster (b. 1941) journalist
  • Eadweard Muybridge (b. 1830) photographer, filmmaker
  • Jubal A. Early (b. 1816) general, journalist
  • Henry Ossian Flipper (b. 1856) military leader
  • Googoosh (b. 1950) film actress, singer
  • Merle Haggard (b. 1937) singer, songwriter
  • Simmie Knox (b. 1935) painter
  • Bonar Law (b. 1858) prime minister
  • El Lissitzky (b. 1890) artist
  • Mungo Park (b. 1771) explorer
  • Pepin III (b. 714) general, king
  • Pinckney Pinchback (b. 1837) activist, governor
  • Ottorino Respighi (b. 1879) songwriter
  • Ving Rhames (b. 1959) film actor
  • Ségolène Royal (b. 1953) political leader
  • Picabo Street (b. 1971) athlete
  • Megawati Sukarnoputri (b. 1947) world leader

Which of the above do you like best?

(Want to see more lists of interesting names? Check out Long List of Unusual Real Names and Names that Make Me Smile.)

Source: Names We Like

Baby Boy Name Needed – Original, But Not Weird

Becca of the blog The Life of a Young Expat wrote to me a few weeks ago. She’d like some help brainstorming for a boy name. She says:

We are a mixed family (North American/Ecuadorian). We live in Ecuador and have a 2.5yo daughter named Kesha Lee who has a traditional Ecuadorian combined last name (Garate Adams, the first part of our last name is pronounced Gah-ra-teh).

I am currently 25 weeks pregnant with a boy and we can’t come up with names that both my husband and I agree upon. We both have very typical names (I am Rebecca Lee, he is Christian Arturo but goes by Arturo), but we would like something original, yet not totally weird for our son. Something like Kesha. You can pronounce it in both English and Spanish. It’s not too long, and it’s not one of those names that teachers will have a pre-existing bias about her when she steps foot in the classroom! (Basically, she can create her own personality!)

The only name my husband and I can agree on is London, but I’m not convinced and don’t think that naming a boy London, considering the current feminine trend for this name, is a good choice.

We own an international immersion program company here in Ecuador (www.elnomad.com) and are avid travelers. So something related to that would ring true with our family. We don’t have family names that we like (I like my dad’s middle name for a middle name, Holmes, but my husband says it sounds like a real estate agency haha).

Lots to consider here! This will be fun.

I’d like to start with the topic of travel first. I think it would be extremely cool to work that into the baby’s name somehow. Here are a few ideas:

  • Damon, which originally comes from Greek myth and means “to tame, subdue.” It also happens to be nomad spelled backwards.
  • Miles, of uncertain derivation, but because it’s a homonym of the English word miles there are strong associations with distance/movement.
  • Nando, inspired by Fernando/Hernando. The entire name-family is connected to travel in two ways: famous explorers (Ferdinand Magellan, Hernando de Soto, Hernan Cortes) and etymology (the first element is said to come from the Germanic word farð, meaning “journey”).
  • Doran, from the Irish surname Doran, anglicized from Ó Deoradháin, “descendent of Deoradhán.” Deoradhán is a diminutive of deòradh, one of the meanings of which is “pilgrim.” Other meanings are “stranger” and “outlaw.”
  • Hudson, from the English surname meaning “son of Hudde.” It was the surname of English explorer Henry Hudson. It’s also fairly similar to London.
  • Palmer, from the English surname that originally signified a pilgrim, i.e., someone coming back from the Holy Land with a palm frond.

I did find some other travel-related names (e.g., Peregrine/Perry, Nestor) but they seemed too old-fashioned to pair with Kesha.

And here are some random ideas based on style alone:

Cato
Colby
Corbin
Crispin
Deacon
Ellis
Finn
Levi
Liam
Lyndon
Milo
Otto
Parker
Rocco
Tevin
Theo/Teo
Tobin/Toby
Tycho

I’m not entirely sure how well all of the above names would work in Ecuador, so I apologize in advance if I’ve included any not-so-great suggestions.

What baby boy names would you suggest to Becca?

Baby Names Needed – Whimsical, Weird Names for Quadruplets

Estelle wrote to me recently with a tall order:

I’m having quads (!!!) in 4 weeks and I need names! I’m having one boy and three girls. My 4 year old son’s name is Cosmo. My husband and I like spacey, whimsical and weird names.

In fact, they “don’t have any limits on how weird a name can be.”

One girl name they’re considering is Ione, which is a family name.

The combination of Cosmo and the adjective “spacey” made me think of star and constellation names right off the bat:

Adhara
Aldebaran
Altair
Aludra
Antares
Antlia
Aquarius
Aquila
Aries
Auriga
Azha
Carina
Corvus
Cygnus
Deneb
Denebola
Hamal
Kastra
Lacerta
Libra
Lyra
Meissa
Musca
Nashira
Norma
Orion
Pavo
Polaris
Rana
Rigel
Shaula
Sheratan
Sirius
Sirrah
Suhail
Taurus
Thuban
Vega
Vela

One nice thing about these is that several together probably wouldn’t scream “star names” to the average person. Unlike, say, a group of flower names. (Though I’m sure stargazers would catch on pretty quickly.)

And here’s what we have for non-galactic suggestions:

Allegra
Althea
Apollonia
Artemis
Aurora
Briony
Calypso
Clio
Danae
Demetria
Echo
Eulalia
Freya
Hestia
Imelda
Imogen
Isis
Lucasta
Luna
Jonquil
Minerva
Olympia
Rhea
Sapphira
Severina
Ursula
Vita
Xanthe
Zelda
Zenobia

Those were the girl names, these are the boy names:

Agni
Aldous
Barnaby
Casper
Cyril
Elan
Evander
Erasmus
Fabio
Gideon
Horatio
Ignatius
Isidore
Jethro
Leander
Loki
Magnus
Milo
Nigel
Odin
Pascal
Peregrine
Reuben
Rémy
Silas
Taliesin
Theron
Tycho
Ulysses
Zenon

What other whimsical names can you come up with for Estelle? And, can you put together any good combinations of 1 boy and 3 girl names?

Update: The babies have arrived! Scroll down to see what names Estelle selected.