How popular is the baby name Vincenza in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Vincenza and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Vincenza.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name Vincenza

Number of Babies Named Vincenza

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Vincenza

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: V

valli valli, v names, baby names, girl names, actress,
Valli Valli (1882-1927)
Here’s the next installment of uncommon female names collected from very old films (released from the 1910s to the 1940s).

Vail
Vail was a character played by actress Vivian Rich in the short film Via Cabaret (1913).

  • Usage of the baby name Vail.

Val
Val Lorraine was a character played by actress Evelyn Brent in the film Attorney for the Defense (1932).

  • Usage of the baby name Val.

Valda
Valda Valkyrien was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in Iceland in 1894. Her birth name was Adele Eleonore Freed.

  • Usage of the baby name Valda.

Vale
Vale Harvey was a character played by actress Shirley Mason in the film My Husband’s Wives (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Vale.

Valentine
Valentine Grant was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in Indiana in 1881.

Valeska
Valeska Suratt was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in Indiana in 1882. Valeska was also a character name in multiple films, including For a Woman’s Honor (1919) and Broadway Scandals (1929).

Valette
Valette Bedford was a character played by actress Margaret Sullavan in the film So Red the Rose (1935).

Valia
Valia Venitshaya, often credited simply as Valia, was an actress who appeared in films in the 1920s. She was born in England in 1899.

  • Usage of the baby name Valia.

Vallery
Vallery Grove was a character played by actress Dolores Costello in the film Second Choice (1930).

Valli
Valli Valli was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in Germany in 1882. Her birth name was Valli Knust. Alida Valli, often credited simply as Valli, was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 2000s. She was born in Italy (now Croatia) in 1921. Valli was also a character played by actress Margaret Livingston in the film What a Widow! (1930).

  • Usage of the baby name Valli.

Vallie
Vallie Martin was a character played by actress Marin Sais in the short film The Man in Irons (1915).

  • Usage of the baby name Vallie.

Vanda
Vanda Muroff was a character played by actress Greta Nissen in the film Danger in Paris (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Vanda.

Vanina
Vanina Vanini was a character played by actress Alida Valli in the film Passione (1940).

Vanna
Vanna was a character name in multiple films, including The Romance of a Movie Star (1920) and Vanity’s Price (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Vanna.

Vantine
Vantine was a character played by actress Jean Harlow in the film Red Dust (1932).

Varda
Varda Ropers was a character played by actress Claire Du Brey in the film A Man and His Money (1919).

  • Usage of the baby name Varda.

Varlia
Varlia Lloyd was a character played by actress Helen Vinson in the film Transatlantic Tunnel (1935).

Varvara
Princess Varvara was a character played by actress Dorothy Revier in the film The Red Dance (1928).

Vashti
Vashti was a character played by actress Thelma “Butterfly” McQueen in the film Duel in the Sun (1946).

  • Usage of the baby name Vashti.

Vedah
Vedah Bertram was an actress who appeared in films in the early 1910s. She was born in Massachusetts in 1891. Her birth name was Adele Buck.

  • Vedah, who died of appendicitis at the age of 20 in 1912, “became the first noted film player to be mourned by the movie-going public.” According to the San Francisco Call, her East Coast family had not been aware of her film career. “Hoping to keep her actions from her friends and relatives, she assumed the name under which she has been acting.”

Vee
Vee Newell was a character played by actress Olive Borden in the film Hello Sister (1930).

  • Usage of the baby name Vee.

Veeda
Veeda was a character played by actress Lois Collier in the film Cobra Woman (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Veeda.

Veerah
Veerah Vale was a character played by actress Mary Thurman in the film Love of Women (1924).

Vee-Vee
Vee-Vee was a character played by actress Nora Swinburne in the film A Girl of London (1925).

Velda
Velda was a character played by actress Elissa Landi in the film The Inseparables (1929).

  • Usage of the baby name Velda.

Velma
Velma Whitman was an actress who appeared in films in the 1910s. She was born in Ohio in 1885. Velma was also a character name in multiple films, including The Greatest Menace (1923) and The Lone Wolf’s Daughter (1929).

  • Usage of the baby name Velma.

Velvet
Velvet Brown was a character played by actress Elizabeth Taylor in the film National Velvet (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Velvet.

Venetia
Venetia was a character name in multiple films, including The Story of the Rosary (1920) and Week Ends Only (1932).

Venice
Venice was a character name in multiple films, including Lady with a Past (1932) and Outcast Lady (1934).

  • Usage of the baby name Venice.

Vera-Ellen
Vera-Ellen was an actress who appeared in films in the 1940s and 1950s. She was born in Ohio in 1921.

Verbena
Verbena was a character name in multiple films, including A Darktown Wooing (short, 1914) and Should Sailors Marry? (short, 1925).

Verebel
Verebel Featherstone was a character played by the actress Dorothy Christy in the film Sierra Sue (1941).

Vergie
Vergie was a character name in multiple films, including The Impalement (short, 1910) and Heaven on Earth (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Vergie.

Vermuda
Vermuda was a character played by actress Martha Sleeper in the short film Sure-Mike! (1925).

Verna
Verna Mersereau was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in 1894. Verna was also a character name in multiple films, including His Temporary Wife (1920) and Here Comes Carter (1936).

  • Usage of the baby name Verna.

Verne
Verne Drake was a character played by actress Iris Adrian in the film I Killed That Man (1941).

  • Usage of the baby name Verne.

Vernie
Vernie was a character played by actress Anna Q. Nilsson in the film Babe Comes Home (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Vernie.

Verona
Verona Babbitt was a character played by actress Maxine Elliott Hicks in the film Babbitt (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Verona.

Veronique
Veronique Sauviat was a character played by actress Louise Vale in the short film The Country Parson (1915).

Verree
Verree Teasdale was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1940s. She was born in Washington in 1903.

  • Usage of the baby name Verree.

Vesta
Vesta Tilley was an actress who appeared in films from the 1900s to the 1910s. She was born in England in 1864. Her birth name was Matilda Alice Powles. Vesta was also a character name in multiple films, including The House in Suburbia (short, 1913) and The Duke of Chimney Butte (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Vesta.

Veya
Countess Veya was a character played by actress Myrna Loy in the film The Climbers (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Veya.

Vianna
Vianna Courtleigh was a character played by the actress Ruth Clifford in the film Mothers-in-Law (1923).

  • Usage of the baby name Vianna.

Vicki
Vicki was a character name in multiple films, including I Loved You Wednesday (1933) and A Star Is Born (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Vicki.

Victoire
Victoire was a character name in multiple films, including Arsene Lupin (1917) and Just Married (1928).

Victorine
Victorine was a character name in multiple films, including Paris at Midnight (1926) and After the Ball (1932).

Vilda
Vilda was a character name in multiple films, including The Return of the Riddle Rider (1927) and Timothy’s Quest (1936).

  • Usage of the baby name Vilda.

Vilma
Vilma Banky was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Austria-Hungary (now Hungary) in 1898. Vilma was also a character name in multiple films, including Federal Agent (1936) and Meet the Boy Friend (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Vilma.

Vima
Countess Vima Walden was a character played by actress Madge Evans in the film Heartbreak (1931).

Vincenza
Vincenza was a character played by actress Rose Tapley in the short film An Infernal Tangle (1913).

Viney
Viney was a character name in multiple films, including The Last of the Hargroves (short, 1914) and The Overland Stage (1927).

  • Usage of the baby name Viney.

Vinnie
Vinnie was a character played by actress Irene Dunne in the film Life with Father (1947).

  • Usage of the baby name Vinnie.

Vinuella
Vinuella was a character played by actress Anita Hendrie in the short film The Road to the Heart (1909).

Violante
Violante was a character played by actress Mrs. A. C. Marston in the short film The Ring and the Book (1914).

Violantha
Violantha Zureich was a character played by actress Henny Porten in the film Violantha (1928).

Violey
Violey was a character played by Loretta Weaver in multiple films, including Jeepers Creepers (1939) and Grand Ole Opry (1940).

Virgie
Virgie was a character name in multiple films, including Lend Me Your Husband (1935) and The Littlest Rebel (1935).

  • Usage of the baby name Virgie.

Virginie
Virginie Harbrok was a character played by actress Marguerite Courtot in the film The Unbeliever (1918).

Visakha
Visakha was a character played by actress Lotus Liu in the film The Adventures of Marco Polo (1938).

Vittoria
Vittoria was a character played by actress Gladys Hulette in the film Enemies of Women (1923).

Viva
Viva Hamilton was a character played by actress Edna Flugrath in the film A Dear Fool (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Viva.

Viveca
Viveca Lindfors was an actress who appeared in films from the 1940s to the 1990s. She was born in Sweden in 1920.

  • Usage of the baby name Viveca.

Vivette
Vivette was a character played by actress Evelyn Dumo in the film The Strange Story of Sylvia Gray (1914).

Viviette
Viviette was a character played by actress Vivian Martin in the film Viviette (1918).

Vola
Vola Vale was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in New York in 1897. Her birth name was Violet Irene Smith.

  • Usage of the baby name Vola.

Vonia
Vonia was a character played by actress Eva Novak in the film The Man Who Saw Tomorrow (1922).

Vonnie
Vonnie was a character played by actress Minna Gombell in the film Sob Sister (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Vonnie.

Vroni
Vroni was a character played by actress Esther Ralston in the film Betrayal (1929).

Vultura
Vultura was a character played by actress Lorna Gray in the film Perils of Nyoka (1942).

*

Which of the above names do you like best?

Sources:


How Do You Like Your Name, Vincenza?

Today’s name interview is with Vincenza, a 29-year-old from Northern Virginia.

What’s the story behind her name?

My name is a skip-generational name, I was named after my maternal grandmother, who was named after her grandmother. The originator was one of a set of orphaned twins. Apparently people were very creative with names in Sicily back then because she was Vincenza and he Vincenzo. Family rumor has it that she traveled to the US with his documentation (he had passed away). But mostly, according to my mom, I was given the name because “it was pretty.”

What does she like most about her name?

I love the sound of it. I like the fact that it’s not very common, but it’s relatively accessible as most people have heard the masculine form at one time or another. It can really be an icebreaker.

(She’s right about the name not being common. Only about a dozen baby girls are named Vincenza every year in the U.S.)

What does she like least about her name?

I dislike the fact that there are so many people who simply cannot pronounce it, even after I have done so for them. I really don’t understand why this is, unless the Italian spelling has tied their brain in knots when they’ve tried for the “ch” sound in the middle. I usually go by Vincy, largely due to this pronunciation problem. I don’t think it’s worth the hassle of correcting and instructing, and the diminutive was what I used when I was younger. Vincy comes with issues, too, actually. I believe there are people out there who still think my name is Lindsay…

Finally, would Vincenza recommend that her name be given to babies today?

I honestly believe that babies should be given the name Vincenza if their parents feel inclined. I have an automatic discussion point when it comes to strangers (this includes job interviews), and I’ve found it helps build rapport to discuss something as deeply personal as a name. Of course, I could just be partial…

Thanks, Vincenza!

[Would you like to tell me about your name?]

Baby Name Needed – Latin or Italian Name for Baby #1

A reader named Claudia is expecting her first baby (gender unknown). She’s looking for a Latin or Italian baby name.

She mentions that her middle name is Elisabetta, the baby’s father is named Simon Edmond, and the baby’s surname will be a 2-syllable D-name similar to Downie.

Here are some names that I think might work:

Adriana
Antonia
Augusta
Aurelia
Camilla
Clementina
Cecilia
Daria
Emilia
Eugenia
Fabia/Fabiana/Fabiola
Felicia
Frances/Francesca
Flora/Floriana
Julia
Isidora
Laura
Livia/Liviana
Lorenza
Lucia/Luciana
Marcella
Marina
Martina
Nunzia
Octavia/Ottavia
Paula/Paola
Philippa/Filippa
Piera/Pietra
Renata
Romana
Sabina
Sebastiana
Silvia/Silvana
Valentina
Victoria/Vittoria
Vincenza
Adrian
Antonio/Antony
Augusto
Aurelio
Camillo
Clemente
Cecil
Dario
Emilio/Emil
Eugene/Eugenio
Fabian/Fabiano
Felix
Francis/Francesco
Florian/Floriano
Julius/Julian
Isidore/Isidoro
Lauro
Livio
Lorenzo/Laurence
Lucian/Luciano
Marcello
Marino
Martin/Martino
Nunzio
Octavian/Ottavio
Paul/Paolo
Philip/Filippo
Piero/Pietro
Renato
Roman/Romano
Sabino
Sebastian/Sebastiano
Silvio/Silvano
Valentino/Valentine
Victor/Vittorio
Vincent/Vincenzo

Which of the above do you like best?

What other Latin and Italian names would you suggest to Claudia?

Baby Name Needed – Italian Name for Baby Girl #3

A reader named Tina is looking for an Italian name for her third baby girl. Her first two daughters are named Francesca and Caterina.

Here are some of the ideas I had for baby #3:

Alessandra
Angelica
Antonia
Arianna
Aurora
Domenica
Elisabetta
Eugenia
Fabiana
Gabriella
Giacinta
Giovanna
Giulia
Liliana
Luciana
Marcella
Margherita
Marianna
Raffaella
Rosalia
Sebastiana
Stefania
Teodora
Teresa
Valeria
Vincenza
Vittoria

I focused on names with 3 or more syllables that don’t end with -ina. (Both Caterina and Tina have that element in their names, so I thought it would be nice to explore other options.)

Do you like any of the above? What other names would you suggest?

Update: The baby has arrived! Scroll down to find out what name Tina chose…

Baby Name Needed – Irish-Italian Name Combo for Baby Girl

Elisa is expecting a baby girl and would like some input on names:

I’m Italian and the dad is Irish, so the last name will be Dillon. As for first name I would like a first pretty Irish name and a middle Italian name (with the Italian spelling), but no matter what I try it never sounds good.

Since I received Elisa’s e-mail, I’ve been experimenting with random combinations of Irish and Italian names…and mostly running into the same problem. I think I’ve found a few pairings that do sound nice, though.

Here’s the (very scientific!) process I ended up using. First I came up with ten distinctly Irish names that I thought sounded nice with Dillon:

Aoife
Brígh/Bree
Ciara
Grainne
Maeve
Niamh
Orlagh
Síle/Sheila
Sinead
Siobhan

Next I brainstormed for ten distinctly Italian names–not worrying about how they’d sound with Dillon or any of the Irish names:

Alessa
Cinzia
Donatella
Francesca
Ginevra
Letizia
Piera
Rosella
Vincenza
Vittoria

And now, the great match-up! There are 100 possible combinations here…surely something will sound good, right? :)

Aoife [ee-fuh] paired with Francesca becomes a bit of a tongue-twister, and the vowel-sound at the end would blend with one at the start of Alessa, so those two middles won’t work. But I like Aoife Piera and Aoife Ginevra.

Brígh [bree] blends with Alessa, and pairing it with Francesca makes it sound like the word “brief.” But I like the assonance in Brigh Letizia, and I think Brigh Vittoria sounds nice as well.

Ciara [kee-ra; kee-ar-a] probably won’t work with Cinzia because of the confusing hard-C/soft-C thing. The combination Ciara Piera could be confusing as well. If we stick with the pronunciation KEE-ra, I think this one sounds good with Donatella, Francesa and Vincenza.

Grainne [grawn-ya] might not work with Ginevra (hard/soft) or Alessa (blending), but Grainne Rosella and Grainne Piera are nice.

Maeve [mayv] won’t work with F- or V-names. But if the V-sounds are spaced out a bit, as with Maeve Ginevra, I think the consonance sounds good. I also think one-syllable first names sound great with middles that start on a down-beat, as with Maeve Alessa.

Niamh [neev], like Maeve, would blend with F- or V-names. But I like it with Ginevra and Alessa (for the same reasons I like Maeve with Ginevra and Alessa) and with Letizia (for the same reason I like Brigh with Letizia).

Orlagh [or-la] wouldn’t sound right with Alessa, and with Donatella would give rise to the initials ODD. But I like Orlagh Rosella, and the matching or-sounds in Orlagh Vittoria. (That might be too sing-songy for others, though.)

Síle [shee-la] starts with an sh-sound that I think could sound nice near the ch-sounds in Francesca and Vincenza. I also like it with Cinzia and Piera.

Sínead [shi-nayd] I like with Alessa and Francesca. (I almost don’t like it with Dillon, though…nearly left this one off the list for that reason. Those dueling D-sounds could be a problem.)

Siobhan [shi-vawn] ends with some of the same sounds that Vincenza and Donatella begin with…I think that’s too much of an echo, but others might really like the effect. I think Siobhan Alessa and Siobhan Rosella sound good.

So there we have it. I think there are a few dozen good combinations in there–but I’d love to hear what you guys think.

Also, what other names would you throw into the mix?

P.S. I just noticed (about 5 minutes after publishing the post) that some of the combos above produce the initials MAD and SAD. Hm…that might not be so good. Then again…girls named Madison and Madeleine are often called “Mad” and “Maddie” for short, so MAD might not actually be a bad set of initials, depending on how you spin it.

Edit: Scroll down to the last comment to see which name Elisa chose!