How popular is the baby name Wendy in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Wendy.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Wendy


Posts that Mention the Name Wendy

Name Quotes #100: Wendy, Kyle, Lou

It’s the 100th batch of name quotes! :)

Real Housewives of Potomac cast member Wendy Osefo told the story behind her name in an episode from late 2020:

For Wendy Osefo, being named after a popular fast food restaurant chain is a constant reminder of her family’s hard work and success. 

“My parents came to this country with nothing. My dad worked at a fast food restaurant and one day he found out that he was being promoted to manager,” Wendy recalled on The Real Housewives of Potomac‘s November 8 episode. “He was so happy that to thank this country for giving him the opportunity to be a manager, he named his second daughter after that restaurant: Wendy.”

She added, “I am literally the embodiment of the American dream.”

From an interview with Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Kyle Trask at Rivals.com:

Florida quarterback Kyle Trask returns Saturday to his home state of Texas, where he will play on the field he was named after.

His parents both went to Texas A&M, so he grew up an Aggies fan.

[…]

His father, Micheal Trask, and mother, Melissa Charba, both attended the school in the late 1980’s. When they welcomed their second son on March 6, 1998, his first name came from A&M’s football stadium.

“My mom and dad were Aggies, so they named me after Kyle Field,” Trask revealed Monday. “My whole family is full of Aggies.”

From an interview with Lou Diamond Phillips at Cowboys & Indians:

The story of his own life began on the Subic Bay Naval Station in the Philippines, where he was born Louis Diamond Upchurch in 1962. His interesting name has an interesting back story: His father, Gerald, named him after U.S. Marine Corps Master Gunnery Sgt. Leland “Lou” Diamond (known as “Mr. Leatherneck,” he is considered one of the finest Marines of all time); after his dad died, Phillips took his stepfather, George’s last name.

(Phillips’ co-star in the movie La Bamba was Esai Morales.)

From a 2014 article about high school basketball player Terance Mann in the Boston Globe:

The inevitable question that the Tilton School’s 6-foot-5-inch, 190-pound shooting guard has heard countless times before: Are you named after that Terence Mann?

“Most people think it’s from the movie ‘Field of Dreams,'” which featured a character portrayed by actor James Earl Jones, explained the junior, who, when not attending the boarding school in New Hampshire, lives in Lowell with his mother, Daynia La-Force, and 15-year-old brother, Martin. “But my grandma’s name is Terancia, and they named me after her.”

From an article about musician Gurf Morlix in Buffalo News:

It’s a name that makes you wonder. Run into Gurf Morlix in album credits for Peter Case or in a concert review of Warren Zevon, and you imagine one of two things. Either he’s a refugee from some republic trying to secede from the Soviet Union, or else he’s hopelessly addicted to science fiction novels.

In truth, he’s an emigrant from one of Buffalo’s ostensibly normal suburbs — Hamburg — and, if anything, he looks a bit English as he talks over a plate of pasta fazool in his favorite hometown restaurant.

“A friend of mine changed it for me,” he responds in answer to the name question. “It was kind of a stupid thing. I dreamed this name when I was 13 years old and I told my friend about it and he said, ‘Well, I’ll never call you anything else.’ And then everybody did.”

From the essay “The Mountains with No Name” by Clint Augustson at the Katmai Terrane blog:

“What are the names of those mountains?” I ask Michael, bear biologist and de facto trailblazer, as I gesture at a sweeping wall of wild windswept cliffs.

“I don’t think they have names,” Michael answers, smiling when he sees my astonishment. “A lot of mountains in Katmai are unnamed.”

I was thunderstruck by the concept. These peaks are as magnificent as any in the lower 48, each with its own striking contours, but they had no known name attached to them. Throughout the park are mountains that may never have one. My first reaction was one of awe: here is a place so wild that massive features are untouched by the human predilection for labels. My second reaction carried a hint of melancholy: these remarkable forms felt strangely underappreciated, no title to lend them texture and personality.

[…]

As I sit on a ridgeline drenched with tiny pink alpine azaleas and a host of other curious forms of tundra life, I consider that it is perhaps better for some mountains to remain ever-nameless, at least officially. Names carry a tremendous amount of power. Cultures across the world affix the act of naming with spiritual weight. Consider Mount Solstice: one could just as easily name this mass Butterfly Hill, Stormclaw, or Timothy, and each would lend different shadings to how we interpret the location, each would shape how we consider it. Can a name really capture the essence of such a place? Do we pay more attention when we cannot neatly affix a place by a pin and conveniently categorize it?

Name Quotes #91: Wendy, Elliot, Thorlogh

From the 2010 book Runaway Dream: Born to Run and Bruce Springsteen’s American Vision by Louis P. Masur:

Peter Knobler, a writer for Crawdaddy, got an early listen [to “Born to Run”] in Springsteen’s Long Branch house. The place was cluttered with motorcycle magazines and old 45s. Over Bruce’s bed, according to Knobler, was a poster of Peter Pan leading Wendy out the window. The detail is suggestive: “Wendy let me in, I wanna be your friend/I want to guard your dreams and visions.”

From an article called “Khmer Legends” in The Cambodia Daily:

[T]he municipality has recently erected a statue of the fabled Yeay Penh, the woman who is credited with giving Phnom Penh its landmark hill.

As the story goes, in the 1370s, Yeay Penh asked her neighbors to raise the mound in front of her home so as to build on top of it a sanctuary to house the four statues of Buddha she had found inside a floating tree trunk. That mound, or phnom, is credited with giving Phnom Penh its name.

[…]

“The problem is we have no proof,” said Ros Chantrabot, a Cambodian historian and vice president of the Royal Academy of Cambodia.

“In all likelihood she did exist or, at the very least, the tale is based on an actual person, since Penh’s hill, or Phnom Penh, is there for all to see,” he said.

[“Yeah Penh” is the equivalent of “Grandmother Penh.” The word yeay in Cambodian is a title used to refer to and/or address an older female.]

From a recent Instagram post by actor Elliot Page (formerly called Ellen Page):

Hi friends, I want to share with you that I am trans, my pronouns are he/they and my name is Elliot. I feel lucky to be writing this. To be here. To have arrived at this place in my life.

From the essay “On Naming Women and Mountains” by Lucy Bryan Green:

My own name scratches and constricts like an ill-fitting sweater. It comforts me to be [at Yosemite National Park] with wild things that do not speak it. As I walk among Steller’s jays and Brewer’s lupine and Douglas firs, I think, you, too, wear someone else’s name. This is also true of mountains, valleys, rivers, and lakes—names within names. I wonder about the people and the motivations behind these names, which I feel hesitant to say aloud.

From a post about Protestant and Puritan names in Ireland vs. England at the DMNES blog:

Tait says one might expect the saint names, pushed by the Catholic church during the Reformation, and English names, handed down to descendants of settlers, to overtake and eradicate the use of Gaelic names as it did in England (315). She found this was not the case. Irish natives and settlers each retained their own naming systems, preserving them both. In the 1660s, she finds the top 6 names used by native Irish families remained largely Gaelic– Patrick, Bryan, Hugh, Owen, Thorlogh, and Shane, while the top names used by the descendants of settlers remained largely English– John, Thomas, William, Robert, James, and Richard (316).

From the 2015 essay “The Name on My Coffee Cup” by Saïd Sayrafiezadeh:

As a frequent consumer of Starbucks…the most contentious aspect for me when ordering coffee—until now, anyway—has been the perpetual misspelling of my name on the side of the cup. The mutations have been many, and they have often been egregious—“Zal,” “Sowl,” “Sagi,” “Shi”—and then once, incredibly, three years ago, at a branch in the financial district, “Saïd,” diaeresis added, prompting me to seek out the barista, whose hand I grasped with deep feeling but who, frankly, seemed perplexed that anyone would have difficulty spelling my name. He was Latino, I think, and he told me that he had a best friend named Saïd, spelled identically, which would explain his astuteness. Never mind the backstory, I was delighted by the outcome. I photographed the cup for posterity, and then, for good measure, tweeted it for the world to see.

Other tweeted misspellings include Saíd, Syeed, Sai, Saii, Sahi, Sie, Säd, Sia, and Sam.

Popular Baby Names in British Columbia, 2019

According to British Columbia’s Vital Statistics Agency, the most popular baby names in the province in 2019 were Olivia and Oliver.

Here are British Columbia’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2019:

Girl Names

  1. Olivia, 263 baby girls
  2. Charlotte, 176
  3. Emma, 167
  4. Ava, 153
  5. Sophia, 149
  6. Amelia, 141
  7. Chloe, 137
  8. Mia, 136
  9. Isla, 128
  10. Evelyn and Ella, 122 each (tie)

Boy Names

  1. Oliver, 233 baby boys
  2. Liam, 217
  3. Lucas, 216
  4. Ethan, 207
  5. Noah, 200
  6. William, 191
  7. Benjamin, 181
  8. Theodore, 171
  9. Leo, 163
  10. Logan, 156

In 2018, the top two names were Olivia and Liam.

In the girls’ top 10, Mia, Evelyn and Ella replaced Emily and Abigail.

In the boys’ top 10, Theodore replaced James.

Finally, some of the names bestowed just five times each in British Columbia last year include…

  • Girl names: Anhad, Baani, Constance, Darya, Emberly, Gillian, Haisley, Ila, Jiayi, Kaelyn, Linden, Mina, Niya, Opal, Ravleen, Saanjh, Tayla, Veronika, Wendy, Zaynab
  • Boy names: Arie, Baker, Casper, Douglas, Elon, Garrett, Henri, Israel, Joaquin, Kye, Leonidas, Malek, Navraj, Orson, Reginald, Sajjan, Thatcher, Vladimir, Wilfred, Zoravar

Source: Baby’s Most Chosen Names in British Columbia, 2019

Name Quotes #81: Anne, Wendy, Charlie

It’s a new month — time for a new batch of name-related quotations!

From a write-up about Ryan Reynolds’ appearance on the Today show in mid-December:

After Hoda asked how he and Blake came up with the name of their third (a clever way to get the actor to publicly confirm what the name actually is), Reynolds quipped, “We haven’t yet! We’re gonna be original, and all the letters in her name are silent.” […] He continued, “I want to give her something to push against in life.”

From an article about the science of baby name trends (thank you, Uly!):

You can even see how the zeitgeist of the age affected American’s [sic] desire for novelty. As Matthew W. Hahn and Alexander Bentley found, the incidence of new, unusual names rose in the 20s, peaked around 1930, but then plummeted in the 40s and 50s. Then it shot up again in the 60s, before reversing and plummeting again in the late 70s. Why? If you wanted to engage in some armchair zeitgeist analysis, you could argue that this makes a crude sort of cultural sense: The “roaring 20s” and the 60s were both periods when significant subsets of the population treasured creative, rule-breaking behavior; the 50s and early 80s weren’t.

From an article announcing the cancellation of a TV series with a name-referencing title:

The Netflix and CBC drama Anne With an E, adapted from Lucy Maud Montgomery’s beloved Anne of Green Gables, has been cancelled after three seasons.

From an article about the weirdly common celebrity baby name Charlie Wolf:

Celebrity moms and dads are going wild for the animal-inspired baby name Charlie Wolf.

Zooey Deschanel and her estranged husband, Jacob Pechenik, kicked off the trendy moniker when they welcomed their baby boy in 2017.

[…]

Lauren Conrad and William Tell welcomed their second little one in October 2019 — and named him Charlie Wolf as well.

[…]

The following month, another Charlie Wolf arrived — or rather, Charles Wolfe.

(The third one was born to former Bachelor in Paradise contestants Evan Bass and Carly Waddell.)

From an article and a blog post about the naming of Wendy’s:

When it came to deciding what to call the chain, [Dave Thomas] tried out the names of all five of his children before he settled on the nickname for his daughter, Melinda, which was Wendy.

Before my dad left us [in 2002], we had a long conversation about him naming the restaurant Wendy’s. It was the first time we’d ever had this conversation. He said, “You know what? I’m sorry.” I asked him what he meant. He explained, “I should’ve just named it after myself, because it put a lot of pressure on you.”

From an article about the “-Mae” trend in Australia:

Marlie-Mae, Gracie-Mae, Mila-Mae… you may have noticed the trend.

Aussie celebs are giving their baby girls hyphenated names with a sweet, old-fashioned sound. The Bachelor’s Matty J and Laura Byrne went for Marlie-Mae, Bachelor In Paradise’s Simone Ormesher and partner Matt Thorne chose Gracie-Mae, while Married at First Sight’s Davina Rankin and boyfriend Jaxon Manuel decided on Mila-Mae.

[…]

Although these names might sound American – think Elly May Clampett from The Beverly Hillbillies – this is actually a huge British trend that seems to be just taking off in Australia.

Rare Girl Names from Early Cinema: E

Looking for an uncommon girl name with a retro feel?

Here’s a list of rare female E-names associated with the earliest decades of cinema (1910s to 1940s).

For the names that have seen enough usage to appear in the SSA data, I’ve included links to popularity graphs.

*

Eadie
Eadie was a character name in multiple films, including The Girl from Missouri (1934) and The Hit Parade (1937).

  • Usage of the baby name Eadie.

Editha
Editha was a character name in multiple films, including The Children Pay (1916) and The Burglar (1917).

  • Usage of the baby name Editha.

Edwina
Edwina was a character name in multiple films, including The Flight of the Crow (short, 1913) and National Velvet (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Edwina.

Edythe
Edythe Chapman was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in New York in 1863. Edythe Sterling was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in Missouri in 1886. Edythe was also a character name in multiple films, including Told in Colorado (1911) and The Repentant (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Edythe.

Effie
Effie Shannon was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Massachusetts in 1867. Effie was also a character name in multiple films, including The Big Diamond Robbery (1929) and The Maltese Falcon (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Effie.

Efra
Efra Cavendar was a character played by actress Dorothy Sebastian in the film The Unholy Night (1929).

Eily
Eily Malyon was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1940s. She was born in England in 1879. Eily was also a character played by actress Gene Gauntier in the film The Colleen Bawn (1911).

  • Usage of the baby name Eily.

Elba
Elba Allen was a character played by actress Beverly Bayne in the short film Every Inch a King (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Elba.

Eleanour
Eleanour was a character played by actress Alice Joyce in the film The Ace of Cads (1926).

Electra
Electra was a character played by actress Norma Phillips in the short film The Glow Worm (1913).

Elektra
Elektra was a character played by actress Mary Fuller in the short film Elektra (1910).

Elfie
Elfie was a character name in multiple films, including Regeneration (short, 1911) and The Easiest Way (1931).

  • Usage of the baby name Elfie.

Elga
Elga was a character played by actress Camilla Horn in the film The Return of Raffles (1933).

  • Usage of the baby name Elga.

Ellabella
Ellabella Jackson was a character played by actress Almira Sessions in the film Dixie Jamboree (1944).

Ellaline
Ellaline Terriss was an actress who appeared in films from the 1900s to the 1930s. She was born in the Falkland Islands in 1872. Her birth name was Mary Ellaline Terriss.

Ellean
Ellean Tanqueray was a character played by actress Marie Hemingway in the film The Second Mrs. Tanqueray (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Ellean.

Ellinor
Ellinor was a character played by actress Valda Valkyrien in the film The Unwelcome Mother (1916).

Elmerada
Elmerada de Leon was a character played by actress Zasu Pitts in the film Professional Sweetheart (1933).

Elna
Elna Johnson was a character played by actress Wendy Barrie in the film The Saint in Palm Springs (1941).

  • Usage of the baby name Elna.

Elnora
Elnora Comstock was a character played by various actresses (such as Gloria Grey and Dorinda Clifton) in various movies called A Girl of the Limberlost, all based on the novel of the same name by Gene Stratton-Porter.

  • Usage of the baby name Elnora.

Elois
Elois Murree was a character played by actress Julia Swayne Gordon in the film The Painted World (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Elois.

Elspeth
Elspeth Dudgeon was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1950s. She was born in England in 1871. Elspeth was also a character name in multiple films, including Sentimental Tommy (1921) and The Storm Breaker (1925).

Elvia
Elvia Allman was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1960s. She was born in North Carolina in 1904.

  • Usage of the baby name Elvia.

Elvina
Elvina Grey was a character played by actress Marguerite Snow in the film The Veiled Woman (1922).

  • Usage of the baby name Elvina.

Elvira
Elvira was a character name in multiple films, including The Cuban Love Song (1931) and Moonlight in Vermont (1943).

  • Usage of the baby name Elvira.

Elvire
Elvire was a character played by actress Olga Demidoff in the short film The Death of Don Juan (1911).

Elviry
Elviry was a character played by June Weaver in various films of the late 1930s and early 1940s.

Elyane
Elyane Parizot was a character played by actress Maria Corda in the film Madame Wants No Children (1926).

  • Usage of the baby name Elyane.

Elyata
Elyata was a character played by actress Juanita Hansen in the film The Lost City (1920).

Elzbieta
Elzbieta was a character played by actress Julia Hurley in the film The Jungle (1914).

Emanuella
Emanuella was a character played by actress Mary Philbin in the film Drums of Love (1928).

Emica
Emica was a character played by actress Yvette Dugay in the film Heavenly Days (1944).

Emillia
Emillia was a character played by actress Carmel Myers in the film No Living Witness (1932).

Ena
Ena Gregory was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1930s. She was born in Australia in 1906. Ena was also a character played by actress Gloria Payton in the film The Faith of the Strong (1919).

  • Usage of the baby name Ena.

Encarnacion
Encarnacion was a character played by actress Lynn Bari in the film Blood and Sand (1941).

Enia
Enia was a character played by actress Edith Storey in the short film Warfare in the Skies (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Enia.

Enid
Enid Stamp-Taylor was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1940s. She was born in England in 1904. Enid was also a character name in multiple films, including The Chalice of Courage (1915) and Whatever She Wants (1921).

  • Usage of the baby name Enid.

Enna
Enna was a character played by actress Florence La Badie in the film Their Golden Wedding (1914).

  • Usage of the baby name Enna.

Enola
Enola Lane was a character played by actress Clara Williams in the short film The Surgeon (1912).

  • Usage of the baby name Enola.

Enrichetta
Enrichetta was a character played by actress Alida Valli in the film Two Orphans (1942).

Eponine
Eponine was a character played by actress Frances Drake in the film Les Miserabes (1935).

Erek
Princess Erek was a character played by actress Vera Lewis in the film The Only Thing (1925).

Erie
Erie McCadden was a character played by actress Sally O’Neil in the film The Girl on the Barge (1929).

  • Usage of the baby name Erie.

Erina
Erina Rodina was a character played by actress Rose Dione in the film The World and Its Women (1919).

  • Usage of the baby name Erina.

Erma
Erma Desmond was a character played by actress Ruth Roland in the film The Matrimonial Martyr (1916).

  • Usage of the baby name Erma.

Ermengarde
Ermengarde was a character played by actress Gertrude Short in the film The Little Princess (1917).

Ermina
Ermina was a character played by actress Gene Gauntier in the short film Captain Rivera’s Reward (1912).

  • Usage of the baby name Ermina.

Ermine
Ermine was a character played by actress Monaei Lindley in the film Her Secret (1933).

  • Usage of the baby name Ermine.

Ermintrud
Ermintrude was a character name in multiple films, including Maytime (1923) and Orchids and Ermine (1927).

Erna
Erna was a character played by actress Bunty Payne in the film A Voice in the Night (1941).

  • Usage of the baby name Erna.

Ernestine
Ernestine Gaines was an actress who appeared in films in the 1920s. Ernestine was also a character name in multiple films, including The Side Show of Life (1924) and Anne of Windy Poplars (1940).

Erni
Erni Gottlinger was a character played by actress Marlene Dietrich in the film Cafe Electric (1927).

Erolinda
Erolinda Vargas was a character played by actress Carmel Myers in the film The Kiss (1921).

Essene
Essene was a character played by actress Nan Christy in the short film A Modern Sphinx (1916).

Essie
Essie was a character name in multiple films, including Welcome Stranger (1924) and Ah, Wilderness! (1935).

  • Usage of the baby name Essie.

Estelita
Estelita Rodriguez was an actress who appeared in films from the 1940s to the 1960s. She was born in Cuba in 1928.

Esthey
Esthey Roberts was a character played by actress Zasu Pitts in the film Two Alone (1934).

Estrell
Estrell Wynn was a character played by actress Marguerite De La Motte in the film The Nut (1921).

Estrellita
Estrellita Estrada was a character played by actress Elena Verdugo in the film The Big Sombrero (1949).

Ethel

  • Ethel Wales was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1950s. She was born in New Jersey in 1878.
  • Ethel Griffies was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1960s. She was born in England in 1878.
  • Ethel Barrymore was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1950s. She was born in Pennsylvania in 1879.
  • Ethel Clayton was an actress who appeared in films from the 1900s to the 1940s. She was born in Illinois in 1882.
  • Ethel Grandin was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in New York in 1894.
  • Ethel Shannon was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Colorado in 1898.
  • Ethel Merman was an actress who appeared in films from the 1930s to the 1980s. She was born in New York in 1908.

Ethel was also a character played by actress Evelyn Brent in the film Raffles, the Amateur Cracksman (1917).

  • Usage of the baby name Ethel.

Etheline
Etheline was a character played by actress Diane Bori in the film Big Town (1932).

Ethelreda
Ethelreda was a character played by actress Elisabeth Risdon in the film Slightly Tempted (1940).

Ethelyn
Ethelyn was a character played by actress Josephine Dunn in the film The Sin Sister (1929).

Ethlyne
Ethlyne Clair was an actress who appeared in films from the 1920s to the 1930s. She was born in Alabama in 1904.

Ethne
Ethne was a character name in multiple films, including The Four Feathers (1929) and The Four Feathers (1939).

  • Usage of the baby name Ethne.

Ethona
Ethona was a character played by actress Florence Turner in the film Indian Romeo and Juliet (1912).

Ethyl
Ethyl Norcrosse was a character played by actress Leila Hyams in the film Spite Marriage (1929).

  • Usage of the baby name Ethyl.

Etiennette
Etiennette was a character played by actress Dany Robin in the film Gates of the Night (1946).

Ettie
Ettie was a character name in multiple films, including Werewolf of London (1935) and Heavenly Days (1944).

  • Usage of the baby name Ettie.

Eudora
Eudora Mawdle was a character played by actress Ethel Wales in the film Our Leading Citizen (1922).

  • Usage of the baby name Eudora.

Eugenia
Eugenia Blondeau was a character played by actress Beverly Bayne in the film Pennington’s Choice (1915).

Eugenie
Eugenie Besserer was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in New York in 1868. Eugenie Forde was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1920s. She was born in New York in 1879. Eugenie was also a character name in multiple films, including The Black Pearl (1928) and Piccadilly Jim (1936).

Eula
Eula Guy was an actress who appeared in films from 1930s to 1950s. She was born in Pennsylvania in 1894.

  • Usage of the baby name Eula.

Eulalia
Eulalia was a character played by actress Carmelita Geraghty in the film The Small Bachelor (1927).

Eulalie
Eulalie Jensen was an actress who appeared in films from the 1910s to the 1930s. She was born in Missouri in 1884. Eulalie was also character played by actress Eileen Percy in the film The Pleasant Devil (1919).

Eulilah
Eulilah was a character played by actress Kathleen Burke in the film The Lion Man (1936).

Euphemia
Euphemia Jones was a character played by actress Flora Finch in the short film Mr. Bunny in Disguise (1914).

Europena
Europena was a character name in multiple films, including Lovey Mary (1926) and Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch (1934).

Eurydice
Eurydice was a character played by actress Mildred Harris in the film A Love Sublime (1917).

Evadne
Evadne was a character played by actress Katherine Lee in the film The Side Show of Life (1924).

  • Usage of the baby name Evadne.

Eveline
Eveline Danvers was a character played by actress Ella Hall in the short film The Mistress of Deadwood Basin (1914).

Evelynda
Evelynda was a character played by actress Margaret Livingston in the film The Last Warning (1929).

Everild
Everild was a character played by actress Ruth Stonehouse in the short film Above the Abyss (1915).

Evvie
Evvie was a character played by actress Blanche Friderici in the film Stolen Love (1928).

  • Usage of the baby name Evvie.

Exquisitia
Exquisitia was a character played by actress Ethel Teare in the short film Adam’s Ancestors (1915).

*

Which of the above E-names do you like best?

Source: IMDb