How popular is the baby name Wiley in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Wiley and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Wiley.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Wiley

Number of Babies Named Wiley

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Wiley

Twin Boys Named for Wiley Post, Will Rogers

On July 10, 1935, Bert and Irlean Ash of Oklahoma City welcomed twin sons. The boys went without names — they were “designated merely as No. 1 and No. 2” — for more than a month.

Will Rogers and Wiley PostThen, on August 15, a plane crash in northern Alaska killed two fellow Oklahomans — pioneering aviator Wiley Post and popular comedian/actor Will Rogers.

Bert and Irlean decided to honor the pair by naming their sons Wiley Rogers Ash and Will Post Ash.

Bert was quoted as saying, “We hope the twins will be able to fly sometime.”

Source: “Twins Named to Honor Dead Pair.” Ellensburg Daily Record 20 Aug. 1935: 6.

P.S. Wiley Post flew solo around the world in 1933 in a plane named Winnie Mae.

P.P.S. Will Rogers, who was part Cherokee, was named after Cherokee leader William Penn Adair.


Namestorm #5 – Baby Names for Aviation Enthusiasts

planeLove to fly the friendly skies? Then this list may be for you. Here are some names from early 20th-century aviation history:

Wilbur and Orville
American brothers Wilbur and Orville Wright built and flew the world’s first airplane in December of 1903.

Louis
French aviator Louis Blériot was the first to fly a plane across the English Channel (from France to England) in July of 1909.

Elise
French aviatrix Elise Raymonde Deroche was the first woman to receive a pilot’s license, in March of 1910.

Henri
French aviator and inventor Henri Fabre designed and flew the world’s first seaplane, also in March of 1910.

Harriet
American aviatrix Harriet Quimby was the first woman to fly across the English Channel (from England to France) in April of 1912 — one day after the sinking of the Titanic. Harriet was also the first U.S. woman to receive a pilot’s license.

John and Arthur
British aviators John Alcock (pilot) and Arthur Whitten Brown (navigator) made the first nonstop transatlantic flight (from Canada to Ireland) in June of 1919.

John and Oakley
American aviators John Macready and Oakley Kelley made the first nonstop transcontinental flight (from New York to San Diego) in May of 1923.

Charles

  • American aviator Charles Lindbergh was the first American and the first solo pilot to fly across the Atlantic (from the U.S. to France) in May of 1927.
  • American aviator Charles Yeager was the first pilot to travel faster than sound, in October of 1947.

Dieudonné and Joseph
French aviators Dieudonné Costes (pilot) and Joseph Le Brix (navigator) made the first nonstop crossing of the south Atlantic (from Senegal to Brazil) in October of 1927.

Hugh and Clyde
Hugh Herndon and Clyde Pangborn made the first nonstop transpacific flight (from Japan to the U.S.) in October of 1931.

Amelia
American aviatrix Amelia Earhart was the first woman to make a solo flight across Atlantic (from Canada to Northern Ireland) in May of 1932.

Wiley (and Winnie)
American aviator Wiley Post made the first solo round-the-world flight in July of 1933. The trip took over a week to complete. (His plane, the Winnie Mae, was named after the daughter of the plane’s original owner.)

Amy
English aviatrix Amy Johnson was the first woman to fly solo from Britain to Australia, in May of 1930.

I concentrated on airplanes, but the history of aviation goes back hundreds of years and covers kites, gliders, balloons, blimps, airships, helicopters, and so forth. What other aviation names can you come up with (from any era, using any aircraft)?

Sources: Famous Firsts in Aviation, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Wikipedia

Tropical Cyclone Names – Abdul, Fletcher, Timba, Vongfong

Hurricane Bill didn’t make landfall last weekend, and Tropical Storm Danny probably won’t have much impact this weekend. It’s been a rather uneventful storm season for New England thus far.

So let’s spice things up with a selection of tropical cyclone names from areas other than the humdrum Atlantic Ocean:

  • Australian Region: Bruce, Fletcher, Gillian, Hamish, Jasmine, Kirrily, Lam, Narelle, Olwyn, Tiffany
  • Central North Pacific: Akoni, Ele, Halola, Iolana, Keoni, Maka, Niala, Oliwa, Ulana, Walaka
  • Eastern North Pacific: Aletta, Blas, Fausto, Isis, Jova, Kiko, Orlene, Paine, Sergio, Wiley
  • Fiji Region: Atu, Beni, Cilla, Funa, Lusi, Nute, Tui, Vaianu, Zita, Zuman
  • Northern Indian Ocean: Baazu, Fanoos, Hudhud, Khai Muk, Mukda, Nargis, Ockhi, Pyarr, Titli, Vaali
  • Papua New Guinea Region: Abdul, Epi, Guba, Gule, Igo, Kamit, Matere, Rowe, Taka, Upia
  • Philippine Region: Basyang, Butchoy, Dencio, Igme, Ineng, Lawin, Ompong, Quiel, Siony, Yoyoy
  • Southwest Indian Ocean: Boloetse, Fame, Humba, Jaya, Olipa, Pindile, Timba, Wilby, Xylo, Zoelle
  • Western North Pacific: Ewiniar, Hagibis, Krovanh, Mindulle, Nock-ten, Phanfone, Songda, Vongfong, Wutip, Yutu

Did you catch Kirrily up there in the Australian group? I’m really curious about that one. It’s a female name, but not listed in any of the name references I own. The Maori langauge doesn’t include an L-sound, so that’s not it. Perhaps it’s just Kira/Kiri + Lee. If you know anything about the name Kirrily, please comment!

Source: Tropical Cyclone Names – National Hurricane Center

UPDATE, 11/2013: The name of the typhoon that just hit the Philippines, Haiyan, means “petrel” in Chinese. A petrel is a seabird. (People in the Philippines are calling the storm “Yolanda,” though.)