How popular is the baby name William in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to William and check out all the blog posts that mention the name William.

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Popularity of the Baby Name William

Number of Babies Named William

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name William

The Coming of Quindon

quindon tarver, romeo + juliet, baby name, 1996, movie
Quindon Tarver

The baby name Quindon was one of the top debut names of 1996:

  • 1999: unlisted
  • 1998: 11 baby boys named Quindon
  • 1997: 23 baby boys named Quindon
  • 1996: 67 baby boys named Quindon [debut]
  • 1995: unlisted

(The variant form Quinden popped up the same year.)

If you remember the 1996 movie William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, then you’ll remember who kicked off the name: young singer Quindon Tarver (b. 1982), who covered two songs for the film: Prince’s “When Doves Cry” and Rozalla’s “Everybody’s Free (To Feel Good).” In fact, he can be seen singing the latter song in the film’s wedding scene.

What are your thoughts on the name Quindon? Would you use it?

Sources: Quindon Tarver – Wikipedia

Popular Baby Names in Alberta, 2017

According to the government of Alberta, the most popular baby names in the province in 2017 were Olivia and Noah.

Here are Alberta’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Olivia, 236 baby girls
2. Emma, 215
3. Charlotte, 187
4. Ava, 184 (tie)
5. Sophia, 184 (tie)
6. Emily, 159
7. Abigail, 154
8. Amelia, 149
9. Isabella, 141
10. Aria, 129

Boy Names
1. Noah, 250 baby boys
2. Liam, 244
3. Benjamin, 229
4. Logan, 226
5. Lucas, 216
6. William, 213
7. Ethan, 192
8. Oliver, 190
9. Jack, 189
10. Jacob, 178

In the girls’ top 10, Isabella replaces Chloe.

In the boys’ top 10, Logan and Jacob replace Lincoln and Owen.

Rare baby names that were bestowed just once in Alberta last year included:

  • Unique Girl Names: Apphia, Bluebird, Caragana, Dalida, Ejona, Feni, Gurmehak, Hillvilah, Ipsha, Jadassa, Kairaluchi, Lemon, Minadora, Nicou, Otito, Plamedie, Qylie, River-Moon, Sembina, Thywill, Urcula, Viris, Widd, Xybelle, Yorkabel, Zyanne
  • Unique Boy Names: Aldrex, Brew, Caffrey, Doc, Etro, Floribert, Grizzly, Hark, Iorveth, Jomart, Kemfon, Luxiano, MavErick, Nitorious-Shyne, Omeshen, Parx, Quintas, Roam, Sights, Tesla, Uzuvira, Vesper, Wolfram, Xax, Yemi, Zoltan

In 2016, the top two names were Olivia and Liam.

Sources: Alberta’s Top Baby Names, Noah, Olivia were Alberta’s most popular baby names in 2017

Name Spotting: Malancthon

sign, colorado, names
Sign inside Garden of the Gods

My dad came out to visit us in Colorado recently. He loves geology, so we made sure to take him to several different places with impressive rocks/terrain.

One place we visited was Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs. In this park we spotted the above sign, which described how the park got its name back in the 1850s:

As they looked over this area of cathedral-like rock spires, one man, Malancthon Beach, commented that the spot would be a great place for a beer garden someday. His friend, a poetic young man named Rufous Cable, replied that it was a place “fit for the Gods.”

It’s a cool story, but, to me, that first name “Malancthon” is way more interesting than the origin of the park name. Where did it come from?

My best guess is that Malancthon is a tribute to 16th-century German theologian Philipp Melanchthon, one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. His surname at birth was Schwartzerd (“black earth” in German), but as a young man he Latinized his name to the classical equivalent Melanchthon (“black earth” in Greek).

Civilian Conservation Corps, new deal
CCC Company 1848

We also saw some names at Red Rocks, which is both a park and a famous amphitheater.

The amphitheater was constructed from 1936 to 1941 by men in the Civilian Conservation Corps, a work relief program that existed during the Great Depression. One display included a photo of 124 of the men in the local CCC. Here are their first names, sorted by frequency:

  • 5: Joe, Raymond
  • 4: Charles
  • 3: Arthur, Clarence, Edward
  • 2: Bill, Byron, Carl, David, Earnest, Edwin, Everett, Jack, James, Leo, Maurice, William
  • 1: Aaron, Albert, Aldine, Alfonso, Allen, Alva, Amos, Ancelmo, Arleigh, Aubrey, Audrey, Barnett, Blaine, Calvin, Celestino, Charley, Claud, Claude, Clayton, Cleston, Dale, Damas, Dan, Darold, Dick, Don, Donald, Ed, Elden, Elias, Elipio, Emerson, Emilio, Eric, Ernest, Eston, Fares, Frank, Fred, Glenn, Grant, Gust, Guy, Horace, Hubert, Irvin, Jake, Jasper, Jesse, Jim, John, Jose, Kenneth, Lawrence, Leland, Leonard, Lester, Louis, Lyman, Manual, Marvin, Max, Merce, Noah, Norman, Orval, Pasqual, Paul, Pete, Richard, Rowland, Rudolfo, Russel, Russell, Sandeford, Trenton, Willard

…What interesting names have you spotted while out and about recently?

Popular Baby Names in North Dakota, 2017

According to North Dakota’s Department of Health, the most popular baby names in the state in 2017 were Emma and Oliver.

Here are North Dakota’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Emma, 64 baby girls
2. Harper, 55
3. Olivia, 47
4. Amelia, 45
5. Ava, 42
6. Abigail, 34
7. Quinn, 29
8. Addison, 28 (3-way tie)
9. Ella, 28 (3-way tie)
10. Evelyn, 28 (3-way tie)

Boy Names
1. Oliver, 63 baby boys
2. Henry, 57
3. Liam, 52
4. Easton, 43 (2-way tie)
5. Noah, 43 (2-way tie)
6. Logan, 41
7. Asher, 40
8. Jack, 39
9. Owen, 38 (2-way tie)
10. Ryker, 38 (2-way tie)

In 2016, the top names were Harper/Olivia and Oliver.

In the girls’ top 10, Abigail and Quinn replace Charlotte and Nora.

In the boys’ top 10, Noah, Logan, Asher, Jack, and Ryker replace William, Mason, James, Wyatt, and Hudson. And Easton is still going strong!

There were also differences between these rankings and the SSA’s 2017 rankings for North Dakota. The SSA data has Ellie and Hazel (instead of Quinn and Addison) in the girls’ top 10, and William (instead of Ryker) in the boys’ top 10.

Source: North Dakota Fast Facts 2017 (pdf)

No One Wanted to Name These Triplets

On March 8, 1911, George and Lida Duncan of Corydon, Kentucky, welcomed triplets — one boy, two girls. They asked several public figures of the day to name the babies:

  • William Howard Taft, who was serving as U.S. president at the time, “congratulated the parents and wished “a long, prosperous and happy life” for the children, but declined to name them.”
  • Theodore Roosevelt, who was president before Taft, “tendered “hearty congratulations” to both parents, particularly to Mrs. Duncan,” but declined as well.
  • Philanthropists Helen Gould and Olivia Sage “also declined to name the children, but sent expressions of appreciation to the parents.”

So George and Lida took it upon themselves to select names for the babies. They settled on Ralph, Ruth and Ruby.

If they had asked you, though, what names would you have suggested for the triplets?

Source: “All Decline to Name Children.” Spokesman-Review 27 Apr. 1911: 12.