How popular is the baby name William in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name William.

The graph will take a few seconds to load, thanks for your patience. (Don't worry, it shouldn't take nine months.) If it's taking too long, try reloading the page.


Popularity of the Baby Name William


Posts that Mention the Name William

Popular Baby Names in Norway, 2019

According to Statistics Norway, the most popular baby names in Norway in 2019 were Emma and Jakob/Jacob.

Here are Norway’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2019:

Girl Names

  1. Emma, 393 baby girls
  2. Nora/Norah, 379
  3. Sofie/Sophie, 326
  4. Ella, 319
  5. Olivia, 303
  6. Ada, 291
  7. Sofia/Sophia, 271
  8. Sara/Sarah/Zara, 265
  9. Maja/Maia/Maya, 260
  10. Ingrid, 258

Boy Names

  1. Jakob/Jacob, 423 baby boys
  2. Lucas/Lukas, 392
  3. Filip/Fillip/Philip/Phillip, 387
  4. Oskar/Oscar, 358
  5. Oliver, 353
  6. Emil, 347
  7. Henrik, 339
  8. William, 333
  9. Noah/Noa, 314
  10. Aksel/Axel, 311

In the girls’ top 10, Ada, Sofia/Sophia and Ingrid replace Emilie, Leah/Lea, and Amalie. (Ada may have gotten a boost from Norwegian footballer Ada Hegerberg.)

In the boys’ top 10, William replaces Elias.

In the capital city of Oslo, the top names were Mohammad and Nora.

In 2018, the top two names were Emma and Lucas/Lukas.

Sources: Navn – SSB, Dette var de mest populære navnene i 2019, The top 10 Norwegian baby names for boys and girls

Popular & Unique Baby Names in Idaho, 2018

According to Idaho Vital Statistics, the most popular baby names in the state in 2018 were Olivia and Liam.

Here are Idaho’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2018:

Girl Names

  1. Olivia, 107 baby girls
  2. Emma, 92
  3. Harper, 88
  4. Charlotte, 83
  5. Evelyn, 82
  6. Amelia, 77
  7. Hazel, 62
  8. Ava, 60
  9. Abigail, 58
  10. Lily, 56 (tied with #11, Sophia)

Boy Names

  1. Liam, 127 baby boys
  2. Oliver, 114
  3. William, 93
  4. Hudson, 83 (tie)
  5. Henry, 83 (tie)
  6. James, 82
  7. Owen, 79
  8. Jackson, 78
  9. Wyatt, 77
  10. Lincoln, 75

In the girls’ top 10, Hazel and Lily replace Elizabeth and (technically) Sophia.

In the boys’ top 10, Hudson, Owen, and Wyatt replace Samuel, Mason, and Logan. Notably, Hudson didn’t even make Idaho’s top 25 in 2017.

Speaking of 2017…the top two names that year were Emma and Oliver.

And now, some of Idaho’s unusual baby names:

Unique Girl NamesUnique Boy Names
Amerikis, Anomaly, Aquamarine, Atlyss, Azkadealliya, Buttercup, Cansas, Ellexy, Gift, Glacier-Dawn, Ingeborg, Jonnacie, Kc, Livingston, Naivee, Netanya, Neverr, Onnicka, Phynixx, Reminatrix, Silentbird, Stormageddon, Sufia, Violetjade, YggdrasilAnarchy, Banx, Bekan, Boss, Combat, Derexx, Geremi, Given, Gnash, Grizzly, Jj, Jrue, Krush, Lighten, Lukasza, Prentiss, Rhun, Skeigh, Thackery, Timber, Trynitee, Tytanium, Ugutz, Wisely

Possible explanations/associations for a couple of the above:

Source: Annual Reports – Idaho Vital Statistics

Popular Baby Names in Sweden, 2019

According to Statistics Sweden, the most popular baby names in the country in 2019 were Alice and Lucas.

Here are Sweden’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2019:

Girl Names

  1. Alice, 688 baby girls
  2. Olivia, 645
  3. Astrid, 628
  4. Maja, 618
  5. Vera, 607
  6. Ebba, 590
  7. Ella, 582
  8. Wilma, 574
  9. Alma, 562
  10. Lilly, 561

Boy Names

  1. Lucas, 768 baby boys
  2. Liam, 760
  3. William, 732
  4. Elias, 729
  5. Noah, 680
  6. Hugo, 669
  7. Oliver, 647
  8. Oscar, 645
  9. Adam, 620
  10. Matteo, 596

In the girls’ top 10, Elsa was knocked off by Vera, which jumped all the way from 19th in 2018 to 5th in 2019.

In the boys’ top 10, Alexander was knocked off by Matteo, which experienced an even bigger jump: 27th to 10th.

So far I’m not sure what gave Vera and Matteo such big boosts, but no doubt it was pop culture — probably a Swedish TV show. That said, Swedish car manufacturer Volvo did introduce an autonomous, electric vehicle called Vera in 2018.

The names in Sweden’s top 100 that rose the fastest from 2018 to 2019 were Hedda and Frans. The names that dropped the fastest were Felicia (bye, Felicia!) and Viktor.

In 2018, the top two names in Sweden were Alice and William.

Sources: Statistics Sweden, Statistics Sweden Announces Most Popular Baby Names in 2019

Name Quotes 83: Bek, Frankie, Monarch

monarch, bear, california, flag,

From article in which musician Beck talks about his first name:

He was born on July 8, 1970, as Bek David Campbell. He and his brother later took their mother’s maiden name, Hansen, and Beck added the “c” to his first name, with the hope that it might help people pronounce it properly. “I still got Brock, Breck, Beak,” he said. “I remember leaving a meeting with some record executives, and one said, ‘Very nice to meet you, Bic.'”

From Orlando Bloom’s Instagram post about fixing the Morse Code spelling of his son’s name (Flynn) in his forearm tattoo:

••-••-••-•—•-• finally dot it right! How do you make a mistake like that?

From an article about the naming of lesbian and bisexual characters:

The nice thing about having an internal database of LGBTQ+ women and non-binary television characters is that you can get really, truly obsessive about various patterns in the data. Like, for example, what queer characters are often named.

[According to the article, some of the top names for queer female TV characters are Nicole/Nikki/Nico, Franky/Frankie, Alex, and Susan. “Some minor abundances: Debs, Deborahs and Debbies. Quite a few more-than-expected Ginas, Naomis and, most oddly, Ruby.” “We are, however, suspiciously low on Marys.”]

Speaking of Frankie…from an article about the popularity of the name Frankie in Australia:

Obviously, there’s a lot of love for Frankie right now. But the interesting thing is that Australian parents love Frankie a lot more than anyone else. Frankie has been among the top 50 girls’ names in Australia for the past couple of years, while not even making the top 100 in either the UK or the US.

From a video in which Emma Thompson talks about “posh” English slang [vid]:

“Pip pip” is “bye-bye.” […] Like, for instance, when I was born, yonks ago, on the BBC, on the world service, there would be the pip, pip, pip. So that’s the “pips.” And you say pip, pip. And I was known as “pip Emma” because I was born as the pips were sounding.

[The pips were used to mark the start of each hour. “Pip Emma” is also the way to say “p.m.” in RFC WWI signalese. I’m not sure if Emma Thompson was likewise born in the afternoon/evening, though.]

From an article about the bear on the California state flag:

[William Randolph] Hearst put the bear on display [in 1889] in Golden Gate Park and named him Monarch. At more than 1,200 pounds, Monarch was the largest bear ever held captive.

[…]

Taking a cue from the Sonoma revolt in 1846 [after which a flag featuring a bear was created to represent the captured region], the state again decided to make the California Grizzly the flag’s focal point. Only this time they wanted a bear that actually looked like a bear.

Illustrators used the recently deceased Monarch as the model for the bear on our state flag.

[Newspaper magnate Hearst took the name “Monarch” from the tagline of the San Francisco Examiner, the “Monarch of the Dailies.”]

For more name-related quotes, check out the name quotes category.