How popular is the baby name Winfield in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Winfield and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Winfield.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Winfield

Number of Babies Named Winfield

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Winfield

80+ Hidden Gems: Rare Baby Boy Names

gemstoneWant a boy name that’s not common, but also not crazy?

I looked through all the names at the bottom of SSA’s 2011 mega-list and found a bunch of hidden gems:

  1. Alaric (48 baby boys)
  2. Alban (12)
  3. Aldous (11)
  4. Aldric (7)
  5. Alphonse (20)
  6. Archibald (14)
  7. Astor (5)
  8. Augustin (50)
  9. Balthazar (13)
  10. Barclay (6)
  11. Barnabas (8)
  12. Bartholomew (19)
  13. Booker (22)
  14. Chadwick (34)
  15. Cyril (41)
  16. Clancy (14)
  17. Claude (44)
  18. Clement (34)
  19. Crispin (21)
  20. Darcy (15)
  21. Dirk (40)
  22. Doyle (10)
  23. Ernst (6)
  24. Ferdinand (20)
  25. Garrick (42)
  26. Giles (20)
  27. Gregor (14)
  28. Griffith (18)
  29. Grover (9)
  30. Gustaf (7); Gustav (29)
  31. Horatio (10)
  32. Hubert (46)
  33. Ignatius (49)
  34. Isidore (7)
  35. Kermit (6)
  36. Lambert (6)
  37. Laird (17)
  38. Laurence (48)
  39. Laurent (9)
  40. Leander (48)
  41. Leith (7)
  42. Lemuel (50)
  43. Lowell (29)
  44. Maxfield (22)
  45. Newton (14)
  46. Nicanor (8)
  47. Norbert (9)
  48. Norris (21)
  49. Ogden (13)
  50. Orson (33)
  51. Osborn (5); Osborne (7)
  52. Oswald (18)
  53. Pascal (25)
  54. Percival (13)
  55. Peregrine (9)
  56. Piers (16)
  57. Regis (10)
  58. Remis (11)
  59. Roscoe (47)
  60. Rudolph (44)
  61. Rufus (39)
  62. Rupert (8)
  63. Sanford (6)
  64. Seymour (6)
  65. Sherman (40)
  66. Sinclair (8)
  67. Tavish (16)
  68. Thane (48)
  69. Tobiah (14)
  70. Walton (14)
  71. Warner (48)
  72. Watson (42)
  73. Webster (8)
  74. Weldon (27)
  75. Werner (11)
  76. Wilbert (42)
  77. Wilbur (20)
  78. Winfield (7)
  79. Winfred (7)
  80. Winslow (10)
  81. York (5)
  82. Zebulon (25)
  83. Zeno (13)

(In some cases, a different spelling of the name is more popular than what’s shown here. For instance, Laurence is rare, but Lawrence is moderately popular.)

Like any of these?

Spot any other good names at the end of the list?

See the girls’ list, or check out the Rare Baby Names page.


Baby Names Inspired by the Spanish-American War

U.S.S. Maine sinking in Havana harbor
The U.S.S. Maine sinking in Havana harbor, 1898

The brief Spanish-American War (1898), which began in April and ended in August, inspired hundreds of patriotic parents in the U.S. to choose war-inspired baby names. Here are some examples:

Maine & Havana

One of the events that led to war was the explosion of the U.S.S. Maine in Cuba’s Havana Harbor on February 15. The explosion killed more than 260 men. Many people in the U.S. blamed the explosion on Spain.

The baby names Maine and Havana both debuted on the SSA’s baby name list in 1898.

  • 1899: unlisted
  • 1898: 9 baby girls named Maine [debut]
  • 1897: unlisted

Maine was a one-hit wonder on the list — a rarity that never returned — but Havana has been on the list dozens of times since (and regularly since 1995).

  • 1899: unlisted
  • 1898: 8 baby girls named Havana [debut]
  • 1897: unlisted

The SSDI tells a more complete story (though it doesn’t offer information on gender). It indicates that 25 babies were named Maine and 12 were named Havana in 1898.

Dewey & Manila

War was formally declared on April 25. On May 1, the Battle of Manila Bay took place in the Philippines. The U.S. fleet, under the command of Commodore George Dewey, defeated Spain.

Usage of the name Dewey spiked in 1898, both for boys and for girls:

  • 1901: 137 baby boys and 7 baby girls named Dewey
  • 1900: 345 baby boys and 9 baby girls named Dewey
  • 1899: 499 baby boys and 24 baby girls named Dewey
  • 1898: 1,115 baby boys and 104 baby girls named Dewey
  • 1897: 158 baby boys and 13 baby girls named Dewey
  • 1896: 63 baby boys named Dewey
  • 1895: 28 baby boys named Dewey

In terms of rankings, Dewey hit 19th (!) for boys and 305th for girls in 1898. Also that year, the spelling variants Dewie and Dewy debuted.

Going back to the SSDI, we see even higher numbers — 6,708 babies named Dewey, 36 named Dewie, and 1 named Dewy in 1898.

We even see evidence of Dewey’s spike on the U.S. Census of 1920:

  • 1910s: over 4,300 people named Dewey were born
  • 1900s: over 11,000 people named Dewey were born
  • 1890s: over 12,100 people named Dewey were born
  • 1880s: over 200 people named Dewey were born
  • 1870s: over 100 people named Dewey were born

An article in the Reading Eagle in 1899 listed ten local babies named for George Dewey, and another article I spotted from decades later joked about starting a George Dewey namesake club.

We see a similar (though less pronounced) spike of in the usage of Manila for baby girls:

  • 1900: 10 baby girls named Manila
  • 1899: 34 baby girls named Manila
  • 1898: 104 baby girls named Manila
  • 1897: 7 baby girls named Manila [debut]
  • 1896: unlisted

Also that year, the spelling variant Manilla debuted. (Manilla was the top girl name debut of the year, in fact.) Manila ranked 306th and Manilla ranked 536th nationally in 1898.

Again, the SSDI’s numbers are even higher — 195 babies were named Manila and 118 were named Manilla in 1898.

Hobson, Admiral, Shafter, Maceo, Schley & Philippina

Here are six more war-related names that debuted on the SSA’s baby name list in 1898.

The baby name Hobson was inspired by Richmond Pearson Hobson, prisoner of war in Cuba. (Hobson was the top boy name debut of 1898, in fact.)

  • 1899: 15 baby boys named Hobson
  • 1898: 38 baby boys named Hobson [debut]
  • 1897: unlisted

According to the SSDI, at least 161 babies were named Hobson that year.

The baby name Admiral was the rank of many of the men (e.g. Admiral Dewey, Admiral Sampson, Admiral Schley) who played a part in the war — Dewey especially.

  • 1899: 13 baby boys named Admiral
  • 1898: 25 baby boys named Admiral [debut]
  • 1897: unlisted

According to the SSDI, at least 154 babies were named Admiral.

The baby name Shafter was inspired by army general William Rufus Shafter.

  • 1899: unlisted
  • 1898: 14 baby boys named Shafter [debut]
  • 1897: unlisted

According to the SSDI, at least 58 babies were named Shafter.

The baby name Maceo was inspired by Cuban revolutionary Antonio Maceo, “one of the outstanding guerrilla leaders in nineteenth century Latin America. (He died in late 1896, actually.)

  • 1899: 9 baby boys named Maceo
  • 1898: 13 baby boys named Maceo [debut]
  • 1897: unlisted

According to the SSDI, at least 34 babies were named Maceo.

The baby name Schley was inspired by Winfield Scott Schley, hero of the Battle of Santiago Bay.

  • 1899: unlisted
  • 1898: 10 baby boys named Schley [debut]
  • 1897: unlisted

According to the SSDI, at least 39 babies were named Schley.

Finally, the baby name Philippina, possibly inspired by the Philippines, was a one-hit wonder the year of the war:

  • 1899: unlisted
  • 1898: 5 baby girls named Philippina [debut]
  • 1897: unlisted

Interestingly, only one Philippina is accounted for in the SSDI data.

Sources:

Politicians Who Were Named After Other Politicians

I was just reading The Political Graveyard’s cool list of Politicians Named for Other Politicians. Many of the politicians on the list were named for U.S. presidents, but others were named for figures who aren’t as well-known today. Some examples:

  • Thirty politicians were named after Henry Clay (1777-1852).
  • Eighteen politicians were named after Abraham Gallatin (1761-1849).
  • Sixteen politicians were named after John Marshall (1755-1835).
  • Thirteen politicians were named after John Jay (1745-1829).
  • Twelve politicians were named after Patrick Henry (1736-1799).
  • Eleven politicians were named after DeWitt Clinton (1769-1828).
  • Ten politicians were named after Francis Marion (1732-1795).
  • Seven politicians were named after Edward Everett (1794-1865).
  • Seven politicians were named after Winfield Scott* (1786-1866).
  • Six politicians were named after John Calhoun (1782-1850).
  • Five politicians (and the term gerrymander) were named after Elbridge Gerry (1744-1814).

Some of those numbers are impressive. Makes me wonder how many baby boys nationwide were named after these men.

*Winfield Scott lost to Franklin Pierce in the 1852 presidential election. One of his namesakes, Winfield Scott Hancock (1824-1886), lost to James Garfield in the 1880 presidential election. Not a lucky name for White House hopefuls, I’d say.