How popular is the baby name Wyatt in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Wyatt and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Wyatt.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Wyatt

Number of Babies Named Wyatt

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Wyatt

Popular and Unique Baby Names in Iowa, 2016

I love that the Social Security Administration releases so much baby name data to the public. But I’ve always had mixed feelings about that 5-baby threshold for inclusion. (Due to privacy concerns, the government doesn’t release names given to fewer than 5 babies per gender, per year.)

Part of me appreciates the threshold. For instance, I like that it adds significance to the pop culture debut names I’m always posting about, as these names had to hit a certain minimum level of usage in order to register in the data.

But the other part of me? The other part just really, really wants to see those rare/crazy names at the bottom of the list.

So I get excited when I find U.S. data from an official source that does go down to single-instance usage. Up until recently, I only knew about Sonoma County and Los Angeles County, but recently I discovered that Iowa (an entire state!) also releases down-to-1 baby name data. Yay!

But before we get to the rare names, let’s look at the state of Iowa’s top baby names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Olivia, 203 baby girls
2. Emma, 181
3. Charlotte, 158
4. Harper, 156
5. Ava & Evelyn, 148 each (2-way tie)
6. Amelia, 125
7. Nora, 123
8. Sophia, 112
9. Addison, 101
10. Grace, 96

Boy Names
1. Oliver, 197 baby boys
2. Owen, 178
3. William, 174
4. Wyatt, 170
5. Henry, 165
6. Liam, 159
7. Noah, 149
8. Benjamin, 148
9. Jackson, 144
10. Lincoln, 123

  • In the girls’ top 10, Addison and Grace replace Avery.
  • In the boys’ top 10, Benjamin and Lincoln replace Mason and Elijah.
  • In 2015, the top two names were Emma and Liam.

(The SSA rankings for Iowa are similar, but not exactly the same. One notable difference on is that the SSA ranks Grayson 10th on the boys list, and puts Lincoln down in 13th.)

And now for the rarities!

Iowa’s website offers interactive baby name usage graphs that include all names bestowed at least once from 2000 to 2016. Here’s a sampling:

Rare baby names in Iowa (2000-2016 total usage)
Girl Names Boy Names
Arabia (1)
Bishop (1)
Currency (1)
Dream (3)
Eros (1)
Fairy (1)
Gatsby (1)
Heritage (1)
Irish (5)
Jasper (1)
KeyEssence (1)
Lisbon (1)
Michigan (1)
Nirvana (3)
Orchid (1)
PairoDice (1)
Qy (1)
Reminisce (1)
Scully (1)
Tear (1)
Unity (4)
Veruca (1)
Windy (2)
Xanadu (1)
Yawh (1)
Zinnia (1)
Arcade (1)
Banksy (1)
Cactus (1)
Denali (2)
Elvis (18)
Fonzy (1)
Galaxy (1)
Helium (1)
Indigo (2)
Jeep (3)
Kal-El (3)
Lightning (1)
Mowgli (1)
Notorious (1)
Opttimus (1)
Player (1)
Quest (3)
Racer (3)
Sanctify (1)
Tavern (1)
Universe (1)
Vegas (1)
Winner (4)
Xyn (1)
Young-Sky (1)
Zealand (1)

If you decide to dig through the data, leave a comment and let me know what you spot!

And if you’re friends with any expectant parents in Iowa, tell those lucky ducks that they have access to full sets of baby name rankings for their state. Either send them a link to this post or to one of the pages below…

Sources: Top Baby Names – Iowa Department of Public Health, Baby Names Popularity Over Time – Iowa Department of Public Health


Popular & Unique Baby Names in Idaho, 2016

According to Idaho’s Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics, the most popular baby names in the state in 2016 were Emma and Oliver.

Here are Idaho’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Emma, 123 baby girls
2. Olivia, 100
3. Harper, 88
4. Abigail, 75 (tie)
5. Evelyn, 75 (tie)
6. Charlotte, 74
7. Ava, 69
8. Emily, 65
9. Elizabeth, 62
10. Amelia, 56

Boy Names
1. Oliver, 124 baby boys
2. Liam, 108
3. Mason, 99
4. William, 96
5. Lincoln, 90
6. James, 88
7. Wyatt, 85
8. Noah, 80
9. Henry, 77
10. Owen, 74

Back in 2012, the top two names were Sophia and Liam.

And here are some of the more unusual names bestowed in Idaho recently…

Unique female names:

  • Consider, Junedarling, Moonlight, Ozzry, Travisty (used in 2016)
  • Chorus, Grizzly, Jedi, Owyhee, Vintage (used in 2015)
  • Always, Blitzen, Kamikazi, Sunrise, Trophy (used in 2014)
  • Germayonni, Jubilation, Khaotica, Masters, Starrabella (used in 2013)

Unique male names:

  • Baelfire, Forge, Geladin, Lil Weezy, Steadfast (used in 2016)
  • Anaxagoras, Gloire A Dieu, Luckybird, Osprey, Rootsimani (used in 2015)
  • Avenger, Cardigan, Eclipse, Granite, Remnant (used in 2014)
  • Branch, Cowboy, Danger, Klydesdale, Ragnar (used in 2013)

Source: Annual Reports – Idaho Vital Statistics

Name Quotes #56: Albert, Arthur, Otterly

sex and the city, movie quote, name quote

From the 2010 movie Sex and the City 2, characters Carrie and Aidan talk about Aidan’s three sons:

Carrie: “My god, three?”
Aidan: “Homer, Wyatt, Tate.”
Carrie: “Sounds like a country music band.”

From a Telegraph article about creative baby names by Flic Everett (born a Johanna, later changed to Felicity):

Very unusual names can, [psychotherapist Christophe Sauerwein] says, make a child stand out for the wrong reasons. “I have a patient aged ten, named Otterly,” he says (spelling it out, in case I confuse it with Ottilie, which now features regularly in Telegraph birth announcements). “It’s a very unusual name and she’s bullied about it. As a parent, you can love a name, but come on, think twice. Is it embarrassing? Will she have a lifetime of explaining herself to everyone she meets?”

From a Pop Sugar article about the naming Prince Charles and Princess Diana’s sons:

When Diana gave birth to her first son in June 1982, he was given the name William Arthur Philip Louis; two years later, Prince Harry was christened Henry Charles Albert David. In a recorded interview that would go on to be published in the controversial 1992 book Diana: Her Story by Andrew Morton, Diana admitted that she picked the first names for both of her newborn sons after nixing the ones Charles had in mind. When asked, “Who chose [Harry’s] name?,” Diana said, “I did,” adding, “I chose William and Harry, but Charles did the rest.” She went on: “He wanted Albert and Arthur, and I said no. Too old!”

From a biography of English actress Ellen Terry (1847-1928):

“Ellen Terry is the most beautiful name in the world; it rings like a chime through the last quarter of the nineteenth century,” George Bernard Shaw wrote of the Dame when she was at the height of her career.

From a Washington Post article about Korean companies forcing workers to go by English names:

The norm in South Korea is to call your colleagues or superiors not by their given names but by their positions. It’s the same for addressing your older friends or siblings, your teacher or any person on the street. So if your family name is Johnson and you were to be hired in a Korean company as a manager, your co-workers would call you “Johnson-boojang.” To get the attention of your older female friend, you would call for “eunni,” or “older sister.”

[…]

One popular Korean blog was more explicit on shirking honorifics in the workplace: “Dropping your pants and [urinating] in the person’s briefcase would be only a little ruder than calling him/her by his/her first name.”

From the abstract of a study looking at passenger discrimination by transportation network companies like Uber and Lyft (found via Baby Name Wizard):

In Boston, we observed discrimination by Uber drivers via more frequent cancellations against passengers when they used African American-sounding names. Across all trips, the cancellation rate for African American sounding names was more than twice as frequent compared to white sounding names.

From a 2016 Elle interview with comedian Alexandra “Ali” Wong in which Ali talks about her baby:

What’s her name?

Mari, inspired by my hero Marie Kondo, who wrote The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. She’s really wonderful, is very into eye contact, and has forced me to be a lot more present. It’s hard to be anxious about the future or depressed about the past when your baby does an explosive poo that somehow ends up in the feet part of her pajamas.

From a New York Times essay about Turkish-American names by Eren Orbey:

Had my mother, Neşe (pronounced neh-sheh), not already published articles under her birth name, she probably would have changed it upon naturalization. Lately, to avoid confusion, she has taken to introducing herself simply as “N,” which her accent converts into an American name. People hear “Anne,” and that is what they call her.

At the start of the essay, Eren mentions that his mother’s name means “joy” in Turkish.

Want to see more quotes about names? Check out the name quotes category.

Popular Baby Names in Oregon, 2016

According to data released by Oregon Health Authority, the most popular baby names in the state in 2016 were Olivia and Oliver.

Here are Oregon’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Olivia, 249 baby girls
2. Emma, 213
3. Sophia, 179
4. Evelyn, 172
5. Charlotte, 171
6. Abigail, 153
7. Harper, 148
8. Amelia, 137
9. Isabella, 134
10. Ava, 132

Boy Names
1. Oliver, 228 baby boys
2. Henry, 205
3. William, 201
4. Benjamin, 194
5. Liam, 193
6. Wyatt, 181
7. Owen, 179
8. Noah, 177
9. Mason, 175
10. Elijah, 165

In 2015, the top names were Emma and Liam.

In the girls’ top 10, Harper replaces Mia.

In the boys’ top 10, Benjamin and Owen replace James and Alexander.

Source: Oregon Health Authority – Annual Report Volume 1, 2016

Popular Baby Names in North Dakota, 2016

According to data released earlier this year by the North Dakota Department of Health, the most popular baby names in the state in 2016 were Harper & Olivia (tie) and Oliver.

Here are North Dakota’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Harper, 65 baby girls (2-way tie)
2. Olivia, 65 (2-way tie)
3. Emma, 63
4. Evelyn, 59
5. Amelia, 45 (2-way tie)
6. Charlotte, 45 (2-way tie)
7. Ella, 43
8. Nora, 42
9. Addison, 39
10. Ava, 38

Boy Names
1. Oliver, 74 baby boys
2. William, 64
3. Easton, 54
4. Owen, 52
5. Liam, 51
6. Mason, 49
7. James, 46
8. Henry, 45
9. Wyatt, 44
10. Hudson, 43

In the girls’ top 10, Evelyn, Amelia, Ella, and Addison replace Sophia, Avery, Paisley, and Aubrey.

In the boys’ top 10, James and Hudson replace Carter and Noah.

In 2015, the top names were Emma (now 3rd) and Liam (now 5th).

Interestingly, North Dakota is the only state where Easton is a top-five boy name. Switching over to the SSA data, we can track the rise of Easton in ND:

  • 2016: Easton ranked 3rd in ND
  • 2015: Easton ranked 9th in ND
  • 2014: Easton ranked 6th in ND
  • 2013: Easton ranked 5th in ND
  • 2012: Easton ranked 29th in ND
  • 2011: Easton ranked 9th in ND
  • 2010: Easton ranked 23rd in ND
  • 2009: Easton ranked 47th in ND
  • 2008: Easton ranked 42nd in ND
  • 2007: Easton ranked 64th in ND (first time in top 100)

In the four states that share a border with North Dakota — Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, and Minnesota — the name Easton ranked 52nd, 11th, 31st, and 35th (respectively) in 2016.

Sources: North Dakota Fast Facts 2016 (pdf), Popular Names by State