How popular is the baby name Yvette in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Yvette and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Yvette.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Yvette

Number of Babies Named Yvette

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Yvette

Jean-Luc – Another Star Trek-Inspired Baby Name

Jean-Luc Picard, Early Grey Tea
“Tea. Earl Grey. Hot.” -Capt. Jean-Luc Picard
© CBS Studios Inc.
The name Jean-Luc debuted on the SSA’s list in 1987, and peak usage was in 1992:

  • 1993: 63 baby boys named Jean-Luc
  • 1992: 65 baby boys named Jean-Luc
  • 1991: 46 baby boys named Jean-Luc
  • 1990: 26 baby boys named Jean-Luc
  • 1989: 21 baby boys named Jean-Luc
  • 1988: 14 baby boys named Jean-Luc
  • 1987: 8 baby boys named Jean-Luc [debut]
  • 1986: unlisted

The inspiration?

Captain Jean-Luc Picard of the starship Enterprise.

Picard, played by Patrick Stewart, was the central character in the TV show Star Trek: The Next Generation, which premiered in late 1987 and ran until mid-1994.

The character, though born and raised in 24th-century France, was a native English speaker. How? According to the show, French had become an obscure language by the 2300s. And yet, interestingly, the people of English-speaking future-France were still getting very traditional French names. Picard’s parents were named Maurice and Yvette, for instance. (Do you think this is a believable scenario?)

The names Geordi and Riker also debuted during the years TNG was on the air. They were likely inspired by the characters Will Riker (first officer) and Geordi La Forge (chief engineer, played by LeVar Burton).

The only other Star Trek name I’ve blogged about so far is Uhura, but there are more coming up…

In the meanwhile, what do you think of the name Jean-Luc?

Image: Star Trek Earl Grey Tea


Pop Culture Baby Name: Chaka Khan

Chaka Khan
Chaka Khan
Chaka Khan wasn’t born with the name Chaka Khan.

The Grammy-winning singer, born in Chicago in 1953, was originally named Yvette Marie Stevens.

During her teens, Yvette “met a Yoruba priest who gave her a new name…based on her orishas, or guiding spirits.” Her new names, in order, were Chaka, Adunne, Aduffe, Yemoja, Hodarhi, and Karifi.

A few years later, she married for the first time and took her husband’s surname, Khan.

Hence, the stage name Chaka Khan.

*

Chaka joined the funk band Rufus in 1972.

In 1975, they released their fourth studio album, Rufus featuring Chaka Khan, which included the popular single “Sweet Thing.”

That year and the next, the baby name Chakakhan appeared on the SSA’s baby name list:

  • 1977: unlisted
  • 1976: 16 baby girls named Chakakhan
  • 1975: 21 baby girls named Chakakhan [debut]
  • 1974: unlisted

Very likely these parents wrote the name with a space — “Chaka Khan” — but the SSA ignores spaces in first names.

The baby name Chaka also became more popular, but only for baby girls (many of whom were probably given Khan as a middle name):

  • 1977: 87 baby girls, 16 baby boys named Chaka
  • 1976: 147 baby girls, 20 baby boys named Chaka
  • 1975: 120 baby girls, 18 baby boys named Chaka
  • 1974: 15 baby girls, 18 baby boys named Chaka

It has since dropped off the list entirely for both genders.

Chaka Khan eventually left Rufus and began a solo career, and in 2011 she was given the 2,440th star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Source: Ollison, Rashod D. “Through the Fire.” Sun [Baltimore] 28 Oct. 2003: 1E.

Baby Name Needed – Girl Name for Cecily’s Sister

A reader named Baccara has a daughter named Cecily. She’s expecting a second baby girl in May, and she’d like some name suggestions. She writes:

To give you an idea of our style, we like feminine names. We also tend to gravitate towards more unusual names, or at least ones that are not trendy.

Here are three names she and her husband are considering:

  • “Charlotte has always been a contender (during both pregnancies), although its popularity is now becoming somewhat of a deterrent.”
  • Camilla. “However, after reading your December post on sibling names, I am concerned that both names are too overtly similar (first initial, number of syllables) to work well together.”
  • Adele, though Baccara’s “husband is concerned with it having a religious affiliation (Hebrew).”

Their surname is a one-syllable N-name, so short names and names that end with n are out.

First, a couple of thoughts:

Cecily and Camilla do have the same first letter and number of syllables. But they don’t start with the same sound, and they don’t have the same rhythm. So I agree that they’re similar, but I don’t know if they’re too close. I think they might work pretty well together, in fact.

I also like Adele with Cecily. The name isn’t Hebrew in origin, though. It’s based on the Germanic word adal, meaning noble. (The first half of Adelaide comes from the same place.) I’m not aware of the name Adele being strongly associated with religion. (Am I overlooking something?)

Here are some other names that I think sound good with Cecily:

Allegra
Althea
Anastasia
Augusta
Aurora
Bianca
Dorothy
Eloisa
Fabiana
Felicia/Felice
Flora
Francesca
Gemma
Geneva
Genevieve
Isidora
Junia
Leona/Leonora
Lydia
Marcella
Margot
Minerva
Miranda
Miriam
Muriel
Phoebe
Portia
Rosemary
Therese
Valencia
Wilhelmina
Yvette

(I omitted Amelia, Evelyn, Vanessa and Victoria because I thought they might be too trendy/popular for Baccara’s taste.)

Which of the names above do you like best with Cecily? What other name suggestions would you offer to Baccara?

UPDATE – Scroll down to find out what the baby was named!

Baby Name Needed – Middle Name for Julianne

A reader named Reba e-mailed me a few days ago with this request:

I need a middle name to go with Julianne. My last name sounds like Mean.

Because the first name is long and the last name is short, I decided to focus on length and rhythm in the search for potential middles.

My first thought was that an amphibrachic name would sound particularly good:

Bianca
Cassandra
Cecilia
Felicia
Francesca
Letitia
Lucinda
Odetta
Pandora
Priscilla
Regina
Sabrina
Samantha
Theresa

Next, I liked 4-syllable names of various rhythms:

Alexandra
Dorothea
Eleanora
Elizabeth
Fabiola
Henrietta
Gabriella
Sophronia
Veronica
Victoria

Finally, I thought an iambic name might work:

Danielle
Estelle
Louise
Michelle
Patrice
Yvette

Do you like any of the above? What other names would you suggest?