How popular is the baby name Zeppelina in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Zeppelina and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Zeppelina.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Zeppelina

Number of Babies Named Zeppelina

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Zeppelina

Name Quotes for the Weekend #26

halle berry quote about her name

From a short item about Halle Berry in a 1995 issue of Jet:

“My mother was shopping in Halle Brothers in Cleveland,” she recently revealed in the New York Daily News. “She saw the bags and thought, ‘That’s what I’m going to name my child.’ I thought it was the coolest name until I got into this business. No one ever says it right, it’s Halle, like Sally.”

From the NOVA video Zeppelin Terror Attack:

On the day that came to be known as “Zep Sunday,” tens of thousands of relieved Londoners picked over the wreckage for souvenirs.

Overnight, pilot William Leefe Robinson became the most famous man in Britain. Babies, flowers and hats were named after him and he was mobbed wherever he went.

Within a month, the technique he perfected for taking out airships had brought down two more. It was the beginning of the end for the zeppelin.

On September 2, 1916, 21-year-old William Leefe Robinson became the first pilot to shoot down a German Zeppelin over Britain. (Several weeks later, a shot-down Zeppelin inspired a British family to name their newborn Zeppelina.)

From an interview with psychologist and baby name writer Albert Mehrabian:

Looking at the psychological health of subjects using my temperament scales and comparing that with the impression given by their names, I found a correlation showing that individuals with less pleasant names exhibited greater psychopathology. It’s a very weak association, but if I were a parent choosing a name for my child, I wouldn’t take a chance at making that association.

From Under the Spell of a Name by Mikita Brottman in the New York Times (found via Appellation Mountain):

I also know a desperately lonely guy who refused to go on a blind date with a woman he met online (who, he had to admit, seemed an uncannily perfect match) because of her name: Bunny.

“If you like her enough, you’ll get over it,” I told him. “You could call her B.”

“I can’t do it,” he said. “I just can’t imagine my name linked with that of someone named Bunny.”

From a funny post about choosing baby names by Robbie Knox (who has a daughter named Kitty):

[A name should not] be the name of a kids’ TV character. This is where we went wrong. If you pick a name similar to a cartoon that has extensive merchandising contracts, people buy you a lot of stuff. We have more Hello Kitty products in our house than the entire teenage population of Japan put together. We’ll be more careful next time when our son Pikachu is born.

From In Our View: Baby names in Utah newspaper The Spectrum:

Hardcore fans of the 1970’s TV show M*A*S*H* will remember the episode when Major Charles Emerson Winchester (the Third) received a letter from his younger sister. The corpsman, who delivered the letter, referenced her as Hon-o-ree-a to which Winchester pompously responded … “It’s Aun-or-ee-a!” No doubt those high-brow Massachusetts Winchesters had all the best intentions when they named the Major’s little sister, but giving a child a name which must be spelled or repeated several times before new acquaintances “get it” is so unfair. There are lots of reasons kids get bullied, but his or her name — or some derivative of it — should not be a cause for learning self-defense.

Want to see more random quotes about names? Check out the name quotes category.

My Top 40 Baby Name Stories

Open BookOf the hundreds of baby name stories I’ve posted so far, these are my 40 favorites (listed alphabetically).

  1. Actsapostles
  2. Airlene
  3. Aku
  4. Carpathia
  5. Cleveland
  6. Dee Day
  7. Dondi
  8. Emancipation Proclamation
  9. Frances Cleveland
  10. Georgia
  11. Grant
  12. Guynemer
  13. Ida Lewis
  14. Independence & Liberty
  15. Inte & Gration
  16. Invicta
  17. Iuma
  18. Jesse Roper
  19. Job-Rakt-Out-of-the-Asshes
  20. Karina
  21. Legal Tender
  22. Livonia
  23. Louisiana Purchase
  24. Maitland Albert
  25. Maria Corazon
  26. Mary Ann
  27. Medina
  28. Pannonica
  29. Pearl
  30. Poncella
  31. Return
  32. Robert
  33. Saarfried
  34. Salida
  35. Seawillow
  36. Speaker
  37. Speedy
  38. States Rights
  39. Thursday October
  40. Zeppelina

My favorite baby name stories tend to be those that I find most memorable. Several of them (e.g., Aku, Karina, Maitland) even taught me something new. In a few cases, it’s not the original story I like so much as something that happened later on in the tale (as with Georgia, Salida, Speaker).

Baby Girl Named Zeppelina

Wreck of the Zeppelin L33

Germany sent Zeppelins to bomb Great Britain a total of 52 times during World War I.

One of these bombing raids occurred on the night of September 23, 1916. It involved 12 Zeppelins — eight aiming for the Midlands, four aiming specifically for London.

One of the London-bound Zeppelins, L33, was damaged by anti-aircraft fire while dropping bombs over the East End. It came down intact in Little Wigborough, about 60 miles east of London, in the wee hours of September 24.

The Germans on board were uninjured by the landing, so they set the airship on fire and tried to escape. (They were the only armed Germans to set foot in England during WWI, apparently.) They were soon caught and imprisoned.

News of the wreckage spread quickly.

Right around the time the L33 was set alight, Mr. and Mrs. Clark of Great Wigborough (one village over from Little Wigborough) welcomed a baby girl. The doctor who delivered her suggested she be named Zeppelina to mark the occasion, and the Clarks agreed.

Zeppelina Clark went on to live a long life, marrying a man named Williams and passing away in the early 2000s. Today, in St. Nicholas’s Church in Little Wigborough, there’s a memorial plaque that reads:

In memory of
Zeppelina Williams
(L33 Little Wigborough 24 September 1916)

[Zeppelina isn’t the only Zeppelin-inspired baby name I’ve discovered. Check out Zeppelin Wong, born in 1929, or the dozens of U.S. babies named Zeppelin since the mid-1990s.]


Image: Great War Primary Document Archive: Photos of the Great War