Holiday Baby Name: Merry Christmas

merry christmas bulbConrad and Nellie Miller built Santa Claus House in North Pole, Alaska, in the early 1950s. It’s now “one of the top attractions in Interior Alaska,” according to the website.

Con and Nellie also had three children, the third of which was a daughter born in 1961. She was named Merry Christmas Miller.

A name like “Merry Christmas” might have made sense for the proprietors of Santa Clause House, but what about for the rest of us? Have any other parents named their children “Merry Christmas”?

Yup.

Merry Christmas Miller is one of only about 40 people that I’ve found so far with the first and middle names Merry Christmas.

Another is Merry Christmas Easter, 1918-2008, of California.

I’ve also discovered about a dozen people with the first and last names Merry Christmas.

Many — though not all — of these Merry Christmases were females born on December 25, just like Merry Christmas Miller.

Source: Williams, Verne. “Santa not in red at $1.50 a letter.” Miami News 29 Nov. 1976: 1A.

More holiday baby names: Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, Christmas Carol, Christmas Tree, Happy New Year


Baby Named After Hurricane Hilda

hurricaneHilda was a Category 4 hurricane that made landfall in Louisiana in early October, 1964.

While the storm was raging, “a baby girl was born in a Morgan City school being used as a refugee center. She was promptly named Hilda.”

The name Hilda comes from the Germanic word hild, meaning “battle.” It was originally a short form of names containing hild, like Hildegard and Brunhilde.

Other hurricane baby names: Alicia, Andrew, Elena, Gloria, Iniki, Isabel, Barbara & Florence, Charlie & Gilbert

Source: “Hurricane-born twisters rip Gulf Coast; many dead.” Press-Courier 3 Oct. 1964: 1+.

Baby Born Day of Orbit Named Orbit

On the day John Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth (February 20, 1962) a baby boy was born in Ogden, Utah, to Mr. and Mrs. H. Ray Hill.

He was named Orbit.

(In fact, hundreds of U.S. babies have been named orbit over the years. Two particularly memorable Orbits are Glenn Orbit Reeves, born on 2/20/1962 in Texas, and Orbit Paul Moon, born on 3/10/1902 in Iowa.)

Source: “Utah Parents Name Arrival Orbit.” Florence Times 27 Feb. 1962, section 2: 8.

Car Crash Baby Named Charity?

In mid-1961, Isaac Reed of Miami rear-ended the car in front of him while driving his wife, Ethel, to the hospital to give birth to their 10th child.

By the time cops tracked him down, he had a new baby girl. So patrolman Bob Rossman decided not to give Reed a traffic ticket.

In appreciation, Reed told Rossman he would name the baby girl “Charity.”

But…did he?

Doesn’t look like it. According to Isaac Reed’s Miami Times obituary, he had 12 children in total, and his eight daughters were named Bertha, Barbara, Deborah, Sharon, Cassandra, Kathy, Katrina and Carol.

Sources:

  • “Kerplunk–A Baby.” Daytona Beach Morning Herald 11 Aug. 1961: 3.
  • Kohn, Ray. “Hard to Win.” Fort Scott Tribune 11 Aug. 1961: 2.

Baby Named Princess, Take 1

In 1961, Patricia Huckett of London decided to name her daughter Princess.

Officials tried to dissuade her, telling her that “Princess” was a title, not a name. But they could find no law against it, and she insisted, so the baby was named Princess Huckett.

Mrs. Huckett said she got the idea from her father.

“He said he knew a chap with the Christian name Lord. When they went on a plane to Switzerland, everybody was fussing around this chap.”

“At work they’ve all started calling me King Huckett,” noted Princess’s father.

(See take 2.)

Source: “Want to be a princess? It’s possible.” Tuscaloosa News 21 Aug. 1961: 3.

Greek Princess Named Alexia

In July of 1965, a daughter was born to the last Greek king, Constantine II, and his wife, Anne-Marie of Denmark.

The new Greek princess was named Alexia “after the Byzantine Emperor Alexius, who ruled from 1061 to 1118.”

Alexia was a favorite name of King Constantine’s father, Paul, who died in March 1964, the officials added. King Paul had intended naming Constantine’s younger sister Alexia, but she was born during the war and was christened Irene — Greek for peace — instead.

Unlike most other royal babies in Europe, Greek royal babies traditionally received just one name.

Source: “Princess Named Alexia; Greek Queen Doing Fine.” Spokesman-Review 12 July 1965: 2.

Older Siblings Vote for Baby’s Name

In early 1965, Marius and Anne Spada of Towaco, New Jersey, welcomed a baby boy — their 16th child. They didn’t give him a name, though. They had their older children vote on his name, pursuant to family tradition.

Of the 15 older children, 13 took part in the election. They were Anselm (19), Marie (18), Lucille (16), James (15), Jennifer (14), Victoria (13), twins Larry and Laurie (12), Patrick (9), Nicholas (8), Annette (7), Teresa (5) and Christopher (4). The two not taking part were Joseph (17) and Marius Jr. (2). Joseph was away on Army duty, and Marius Jr. was considered too young.

The parents had no say in the balloting. “We leave it entirely up to them,” Marius Sr. (44) told the papers. “I used to be able to sway the election, but I guess I’m too old now politically to carry much weight.”

The winning name was Dominick, with 11 votes. Marius Sr. explained that the name was inspired by “a priest, Father Dominick, who’s a friend of the family.” Runners-up were John and Anthony, with 1 vote each.

Source: “‘Decision of Lifetime’ Made by Youngsters.” Spokane Daily Chronicle 20 Jan. 1965: 27.