Baby Named for Slain Amish Schoolgirl

On the morning of October 2, 2006, a gunman took ten girls (aged 6 to 13) hostage in a one-room Amish schoolhouse in Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania. He shot the girls, killing five and wounding the other five, before committing suicide.

One of the victims was 7-year-old Naomi Rose Ebersol. Earlier during the incident — before the gunman had ordered the adult women and the boys to leave — Naomi had been comforted by a pregnant woman named Lydia Mae Zook:

[Lydia] reached over and patted the frightened child on the back.

“It’s going to be all right,” she assured the little girl.

On October 10, Lydia gave birth to her baby girl three weeks early. She named the baby Naomi Rose.

(The other little girls who lost their lives were named Anna, Lena, Marian, and Mary.)

Source: Dribben, Melissa. “In Amish survivor’s baby, hope lives “Shattered, but strong”: Woman who escaped death relates her story.” Philadelphia Inquirer 22 Oct. 2006.

Iraqi Baby Names, During and After Saddam

Baghdad, April, 2003
Baghdad, April, 2003
When the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq began in March of 2003, tens of thousands of Kurds in northern Iraq fled from their cities and villages and took shelter in the hills.

One of these displaced Kurdish families included a boy named Awara, which means “refugee.” His older brother said Awara’s name would be changed to Azad, or “freedom,” once it was safe for the family to return to their home village.

By April, Saddam Hussein was out of power.

And along with the change in regime came a change in baby naming trends. The name “Saddam” and the names of Saddam Hussein’s children (e.g., Udai, Kusai, Rajad, Halla), which had been trendy up to that point, quickly fell out of favor. An employee of Iraq’s National Registry in Baghdad said in late 2003, “We haven’t had even one Saddam since the fall of the regime on April 9th.”

Instead, Iraqi parents started opting for other namesakes. The director of the National Registry mentioned that more than 20 babies had been named for religious leader (and Hussein enemy) Ayatollah Mohammad Baqir al-Hakim after he was assassinated in August, for example.

I couldn’t find any follow-up articles about Awara’s family, though, so I don’t know if they ever made it back to their village, or whether Awara’s name was finally changed from “refugee” to “freedom.”


Baby Named for Basketball’s Boschee

In January of 2002, University of Kansas basketball fan Scott Schlesener made a deal with his wife Jodi. If the Jayhawks ended up winning the national championship that spring, “they’d name their fifth child after sharp-shooting guard Jeff Boschee.”

Jodi, who didn’t think the Jayhawks would win, thought it was safe to make the deal — though she had the presence of mind to make sure they were talking about the baby’s middle name and not her first name.

The baby girl was born March 21. Even though the NCAA tournament wouldn’t be decided until April 1, they went ahead and named their daughter Deavynn Boschee Christine Schlesener.

And they kept the name even after the Jayhawks lost to the Maryland Terrapins in the semifinals. (The Indiana Hoosiers won the championship that year.)

Source: “Parents Name Baby After KU’s Boschee.” Fort Scott Tribune 26 Mar. 2002: 9.

Another Indian Baby Named for Railway Minister

A couple of years ago, I posted about an Indian baby who was born on a train and named after Mamata Banerjee, who served as Minister of Railways from 2009 to 2011.

I’ve since found another Indian baby who was born on a train and named for a railway minister.

This baby was born in late 2009 aboard the 5651 Lohit Express while it was stopped at the Desari railway station. He was named after Lalu Prasad, who served as Minister of Railways from 2004 to 2009.

Source: Birth of Lalu Prasad on train

P.S. Did you know that state-owned Indian Railways is the 8th-largest employer in the world?

Brazilian Boy Named for French Soccer Players

France was eliminated in quarter-finals of the 2014 World Cup last week, right around the time news of a 7-year-old Brazilian boy with a unique World Cup-inspired name made headlines.

Zinedine Yazid Zidane Thierry Hanry Bapthez Eric Felipe

Despite the fact that France beat Brazil in the 2006 World Cup, Petrucio Dos Santos of Brazil decided to name his son, born in October of that year, Zinedine Yazid Zidane Thierry Hanry Bapthez Eric Felipe Silva Santos. (Silva Santos is the family name.)

[T]he boy’s father said he decided to pay tribute to three of the team’s stars: Barthez, Zidane, and Henry. The name Eric is a tribute to French forward and Manchester United legend Eric Cantona while Felipe pays homage to Brazil’s manager Luiz Felipe Scolari.

Why pay tribute to the French team? Petrucio said he became fond of France after visiting the country and being “captivated by the kindness” of the people there.

Young Zinedine doesn’t care for his long name, though. So far he’s only managed to memorize a portion of it. He wishes he’d been named after Brazilian midfielder Luiz Gustavo instead, he said.

(Other World Cup-inspired baby names I’ve blogged about: Fifa, Rahn, Soccer City & more.)

Sources: Il appelle son fils “Zinedine Yazid Zidane Thierry Hanry Barthez Eric Felipe”, #WorldCup: He’s Got The Whole Team In His Name

Polish Triplets Named for John Paul II

Pope John Paul II, the first Polish Pope in history, died on April 2, 2005.

Days later, Janusz and Kinga Adamiec of Poland welcomed triplets — three boys.

The boys, born in the southern town of Bytom, were named Jan, Pawel and Karol, the Polish versions of John, Paul and the Pope’s first name, Karol.

Another Polish baby born that week “in an ambulance outside the bishops’ palace in Krakow — where the Pope had lived and worked” and named Karol.

Source: Polish triplets named after Pope

2 Babies Named Joslin After Joslin Diabetes Center

On June 27, a long-time Joslin Diabetes Center patient gave birth to a baby girl.

The baby’s name? Joslin Marie.

“I decided to name my daughter Joslin because of the care I received at Joslin,” explained Elizabeth. “More specifically because of one appointment I had with Dr. Eyiuche Okeke. When I was about 21 years old I had a regular, routine appointment and at that point, my diabetes was so out of control.

“With an A1C of 10 or 11, Dr. Okeke flat out told me ‘if you were to get pregnant right now, your baby would have a 65 to 80 percent chance of having birth defects.’ Being a young adult, I knew that I always wanted to have children. I couldn’t help but cry that day, but more importantly, reevaluate my lifestyle,” she said.

And that’s not all — I know of another baby named Joslin after the Joslin Diabetes Center.

Hannah Joslin Fascione was born to Lorraine Fascione of Newington, CT, in March of 2000. Lorraine, who suffered from gestational diabetes, was treated at a Joslin-affiliated diabetes center in Connecticut.

So where did the Joslin Diabetes Center get its name? The Boston-based organization grew out of the private practice of Dr. Elliott P. Joslin (1869-1962), the first U.S. doctor to specialize in diabetes.

And where does the surname Joslin come from? It was originally a personal name, brought to England by the Normans in the 11th century. Early spelling variants include Goscelin, Gosselin and Joscelin.

In most cases, Joslin can be traced back to the Germanic name Gauzelin, which was a pet form of Germanic names that included the name element Gaut (of unknown meaning).

In other cases, Joslin was a pet form of the Old French name Josse, a version of the Breton name Iodoc/Jodoc, which was based on the Breton word iudh, meaning “lord.”

Do you like the name Joslin?