Five-Name Friday: Boy Name for Sullivan’s Brother

five-name friday, boy name

You’re taking a midday stroll in the park when you happen to fall into step with a friendly pregnant lady. The two of you chat about all sorts of things — from current events to Yankee Swap optimization strategies — until the clouds roll in and the wind picks up. As you both walk back to the parking lot, you ask if she’s chosen a name for the baby yet. She says no, then tells you the gist of what she’s looking for:

I am expecting a third son, to brothers Lincoln and Sullivan. I like surnames as first names (obviously!) and would love a science or literary connected name.

“Do you have any suggestions?”

You’re a name-lover, and you could potentially give her dozens of suggestions. But the temperature has dropped, so you only have time to give her five baby name suggestions before the two of you part ways.

But here’s the fun part: Instead of blurting out the first five names you come up with (which is what you’d be forced to do in real life) you get to press a magical “pause” button, brainstorm for a bit, and then “unpause” the scenario to offer her the best five names you can think of.

Here are a few things to keep in mind as you brainstorm:

  • Be independent. Decide on your five names before looking at anyone else’s five names.
  • Be sincere. Would you honestly suggest these particular baby names out loud to a stranger in public?
  • Five names only! All names beyond the first five in your comment will be either deleted or replaced with nonsense words.
    • HINT: If one or more of your name suggestions has a science/literature connection that’s subtle or obscure, try adding context with a description (e.g., “physicist,” “mystery writer”) instead of a full name.

Finally, here’s the request again:

I am expecting a third son, to brothers Lincoln and Sullivan. I like surnames as first names (obviously!) and would love a science or literary connected name.

Which five baby names would you suggest?

[To send in your own 2-sentence baby name request, here are the directions, and here’s the contact form.]


Unusual Real Names: Eulavelle, Jettabee, McKaskia

Another batch of long unusual-but-real names:

  • Eulavelle: Eulavelle Lee Drake was born in California in 1913.
  • Henderina: Botanist/cinematographer Henderina “Rina” Victoria Scott was born in England in 1862.
  • Hurieosco: Hurieosco Austill was born in Alabama in 1841.
  • Jacquemin: Jacquemin, brother of Jeanne d’Arc, was born in France in the early 15th century.
  • Jettabee: Radio scriptwriter Jettabee Ann Hopkins was born in Nebraska in 1905.
  • Lianella: Film actress Lianella Carell was born in Italy in 1927.
  • Limbania: St. Limbania was born in Cyprus in the 13th century. The Philadelphia Art Museum has a painting of Saint Limbania (1725).
  • Lodusky: Lodusky Jerusha Taylor was born in Minnesota in 1856. (According to Cleveland Kent Evans, the name Lodusky was derived from the literature name Lodoïska, which may have been inspired by Louise. The title character in Frances Hodgson Burnett’s book Lodusky (1877) went by the nickname “Dusk.”)
  • Marjabelle: Etiquette expert Marjabelle Young Stewart was born in Iowa in 1924.
  • Marmaduke: Shipping magnate Marmaduke Furness was born in England in 1883.
  • McKaskia: McKaskia Stearns Bonnifield was born in West Virginia in 1833.
  • Mellcene: Mellcene Thurman Smith was born in Missouri in 1872.
  • Minervina: Minervina was the first wife of Constantine the Great during the early 4th century.

Which of the above do you like best?

Babies Named Thanksgiving

turkeyWe’ve talked about people named Easter, Fourth (of July), Halloween, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year…what about Thanksgiving? I mean, we’ve already met Dr. Happy Thanksgiving, but are there more?

Yes, at least a few dozen more. As you’d expect, nearly all were born in late November. Here are three examples:

The two most recent Thanksgivings I found were both born in the 1990s.

Uncommon Baby Names in Oregon, 2012

Oregon’s Open Data website includes several tables of baby name data from 2012.

The most interesting thing about this data? It goes all the way down to names given to just three babies per year. (All the SSA baby name lists, on the other hand, have a five-baby cutoff.)

So here are some of the baby names that were bestowed in Oregon just three or four times in 2012:

Girl Names Boy Names
Amberly
Andromeda
Arianny
Damaris
Diem
Ellingon
Fern
Gaia
Io
Isela
Jubilee
Kahlan
Linnea
Lois
Lumen
Magali
Rue
Sahasra
Sanvi
Sayuri
Seven
Sinai
Siri
Sonora
Sparrow
Timber
Twyla
Van
Yara
Achilles
Alvin
Atlas
Atreyu
Bear
Briar
Calder
Carver
Clive
Dutch
Forest
Huck
Hyrum
Isley
Kainoa
Kincaid
Koa
Larry
Loki
Montgomery
Riot
Rogue
Summit
Tavish
Tiberius
Tor
Trapper
Van
Zephyr

The name Diem has been in the SSA data since the ’80s, but a lot of the recent usage was probably inspired by Danielle Michelle “Diem” Brown, who appeared on various MTV reality TV shows from 2006 to 2015. (She passed away in 2014 from ovarian cancer.) In her case, “Diem” was a nickname based on the initials “D.M.,” making this yet another girl name that can be spelled with the names of letters.

Sources: 2012 Boy Baby Names | Oregon transparency, 2012 Girl Baby Names | Oregon transparency

Five-Name Friday: Boy Name like Graham, Tanner

five-name friday, boy name

You’re at the mall, doing some early holiday shopping, when a nice lady who happens to be pregnant strikes up a conversation with you. After a few minutes she mentions that she and her husband haven’t been able to settle on a name for the baby. Then she tells you what they’re looking for:

We like boy names like Graham, Maxwell, and Tanner. Would love something that has never been (and will hopefully never be!) in the US top 100.

You’re a name-lover, and you could potentially give her dozens of great suggestions on the spot. But you’ve got more shopping to do, so you only have time to give her five baby name suggestions before hitting the next store.

But here’s the fun part: Instead of blurting out the first five names you come up with (which is what you’d be forced to do in real life) you get to press a magical “pause” button, brainstorm for a bit, and then “unpause” the scenario to offer her the best five names you can think of.

Here are a few things to keep in mind as you brainstorm:

  • Be independent. Decide on your five names before looking at anyone else’s five names.
  • Be sincere. Would you honestly suggest these particular baby names out loud to a stranger in the mall?
  • Five names only! All names beyond the first five in your comment will be either deleted or replaced with nonsense words.

Finally, here’s the request again:

We like boy names like Graham, Maxwell, and Tanner. Would love something that has never been (and will hopefully never be!) in the US top 100.

Which five baby names are you going to suggest?

[To send in your own 2-sentence baby name request, here are the directions, and here’s the contact form.]

Five-Name Friday: Boy Name for Fiona’s Brother

five-name friday, girl name

You’re in the waiting room at the dentist’s office, chatting with the friendly pregnant lady a few seats down. She is equally unenthusiastic about getting a cleaning today, but she says flipping through random magazines is helping her brainstorm for baby names. You ask what type of name she’s searching for and she responds:

I’m looking for a name for Fiona’s little brother. I don’t want it to start with F/Ph, M, or T please.

“Do you have any suggestions?”

You’re a name-lover, and you could potentially give her dozens of suggestions. But the hygienist just called your name, so you only have time to give her five baby name suggestions before you head off to the chair of pain dental chair.

But here’s the fun part: Instead of blurting out the first five names you come up with (which is what you’d be forced to do in real life) you get to press a magical “pause” button, brainstorm for a bit, and then “unpause” the scenario to offer her the best five names you can think of.

Here are a few things to keep in mind as you brainstorm:

  • Be independent. Decide on your five names before looking at anyone else’s five names.
  • Be sincere. Would you honestly suggest these particular baby names out loud to a stranger in the dentist’s office?
  • Five names only! All names beyond the first five in your comment will be either deleted or replaced with nonsense words.

Finally, here’s the request again:

I’m looking for a name for Fiona’s little brother. I don’t want it to start with F/Ph, M, or T please.

Which five baby names are you going to suggest?

[To send in your own 2-sentence baby name request, here are the directions, and here’s the contact form.]

Baby Nearly Named After Police Officer

On July 30, 1946, Los Angeles police officer Harry Dowty helped a pregnant woman named Edith Runfola deliver a baby girl.

According to the LA Times, Edith “said she [would] name the baby Harriet in honor of Officer Dowty.”

But what do the records say? The California Birth Index shows that Edith’s daughter got the first name Josephine and middle name Katherine. No mention of “Harriet.”

Did Edith change her mind? Did her husband veto “Harriet”? We shall never know…

But we do know the names of Edith’s other children. The article listed the 10 born before Josephine and the California Birth Index revealed that at least two more came along after:

  • Florence
  • Pearl
  • Ruby
  • Willie
  • Hazel
  • Marie
  • Daniel
  • Grace
  • Edith
  • Kenneth
  • Josephine (and not Harriet)
  • Jack
  • Helena

Source: “Police Officer Assists at Birth of Baby Girl.” Los Angeles Times 31 Jul. 1946: A1.