How popular is the baby name Alexandre in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Alexandre.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Alexandre


Posts that Mention the Name Alexandre

Name quotes #103: Doug, Armand, Galusha

quotation marks

Happy New Year, everyone! Let’s kick things off with some name quotes…

From a 2009 article about Microsoft executive J Allard in Boston University’s alumni magazine Bostonia:

Allard still loves video games (his all-time favorite is “Robotron”). And even his name (legally changed from James) is an homage to computers. In the late 1980s, he explains, “it was my log-in on all of the computer systems at school, and it stuck.”

From a BBC article about Doug Bowser becoming president of Nintendo of America in 2019:

In what is surely one of the most charming cases of nominative determinism ever, it has been announced the new head of Nintendo of America will be a man named Doug Bowser.

Bowser, as Nintendo fans will know all too well, has long been Super Mario’s main nemesis — a foe who, for more than three decades now, routinely kidnapped Mario’s girlfriend, Princess Peach.

Mr. Bowser will take over in April from retiring Reggie Fils-Aime, a highly popular figure among Nintendo fans.

“With a name like Bowser, who better to hold the keys to the Nintendo castle?” Mr. Fils-Aime said about his successor in a video message posted on Twitter on Thursday.

From an AP news story about the origin of Armand Hammer’s name:

Industrialist Armand Hammer often said he was named after Armand Duval, the hero in Alexandre Dumas’ play “Camille.”

But he conceded later that his father, a socialist, also had in mind the arm-and-hammer symbol of the Socialist Labor Party.

For years, people erroneously thought Hammer was connected to the company that makes Arm & Hammer baking soda.

From an essay about Island Cemetery (on Block Island, in Rhode Island) by Martha Ball:

The cemetery, our own City on a Hill, has always been a place of enchantment, holding stones lacking uniformity even within the same lot, bearing names alien to our time; Philamon Galusha, Icivilli, Darius. It is enhanced by an awareness of the sheer physical accomplishment it embodies, a steep slope terraced long before we had today’s array of earth moving equipment.

[Neither Darius Rucker nor I would agree that the name Darius is “alien to our time.” Looking over the other names at Island Cemetery, I saw all the expected Biblical entries (Peleg, Obed, Barzilla; Zilpah, Huldah, Hepzebah), plenty of fanciful feminines (Lucretia, Cordelia, Sophronia), and a few references to current events: a Martin VanBuren born in 1839, a Cassius Clay born in 1854, an Elsworth (middle name) born in 1861, an Ambrose Everett born in 1862, and a Ulysses born in 1868.]

From an article about early Soviet film director Dziga Vertov at Russia Beyond:

Vertov’s real name was David Kaufman, which unambiguously points to his Jewish origin. But the desire of the talented youth from Bialystok (at the time part of the Russian Empire, today Poland) to change his surname upon arrival in Moscow was unlikely to have been due to anti-Semitism — in the 1920s it was not as developed as in the 1950s. Vertov, like many avant-garde artists, probably just chose a new name to herald “a new life.”

In Ukrainian dziga means whirligig, spinning top, while vertov comes from the verb vertet (to spin). The two form something like “the spinning whirligig,” a name that was entirely fitting for the man who bore it.

From a recent interview with Chrishell Stause of the reality TV show Selling Sunset at Vulture.com:

I was not born in a Shell station. I hate to disappoint people that think I was. My mom was getting car work done, and an attendant at the station was helping her and keeping her calm. Obviously she couldn’t drive to the hospital then, so the ambulance came. I made it to the hospital, but she wanted to name me after him. He worked at the Shell station, so she just thought “Chris, shell” — let’s stick them together. And you know, Chrishell was born, quite literally.

From a short article called “Americana: Zany Zach” published in Time magazine in 1979:

Move over, Zeke Zzzypt of Chicago and Vladimir Zzzyd of Miami. Few have proved more zealous in trying to be the last personal name in a local telephone book than Zachary Zzzzzzzzzra, who has brought up the rear of San Francisco’s directory for eight of the past 15 years. Several years ago, when he was just plain Zachary Zzzra, Zzzzzzzzzra discovered to his sorrow that he had been zapped from last place by Zelda Zzzwramp, and so he added another z to his name. Last year, as Zzzzra, he was infuriated when he lost put to Vladimir Zzzzzzabakov. This year, tie outztripped all rivals by becoming Zzzzzzzzzra and once again won the last word.

“Zachary Zzzzzzzzzra” was actually a painting contractor named Bill Holland. He used “his telephone name as an advertising gimmick, telling potential customers to look him up in the back of the book in stead of handing out business cards.”

Popular and unique baby names in Quebec (Canada), 2020

According to Retraite Québec, the most popular baby names in Quebec last year were (again) Olivia and Liam.

Here are the province’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2020:

Girl Names

  1. Olivia, 543 baby girls
  2. Alice, 491 (2-way tie)
  3. Emma, 491 (2-way tie)
  4. Charlie, 488
  5. Charlotte, 449 (2-way tie)
  6. Lea, 449 (2-way tie)
  7. Florence, 447
  8. Livia, 437
  9. Romy, 338
  10. Clara, 335

Boy Names

  1. Liam, 661 baby boys
  2. William, 644
  3. Noah, 639
  4. Thomas, 594
  5. Leo, 572
  6. Nathan, 518
  7. Edouard, 489
  8. Logan, 478
  9. Jacob, 468
  10. Arthur, 461

In the girls’ top 10, Romy and Clara replaced Rosalie and Beatrice.

In the boys’ top 10, Jacob and Arthur replaced Felix, Raphael and Emile.

Below are some of the baby names that were bestowed just once in Quebec last year. (I tried to focus on First Nations names this time around.)

Unique Girl NamesUnique Boy Names
Ange Lumiere, Avanika, Balkissa, Cathy Jaguar, Croyance, Daphka, Ezralene, Framboise, Gaela Olga, Himalaya Fay, Iaely, Jolly-Anne, Julia Uapikun, Katsuak, Kim-Sparkle, Lailah-Waseskon, Lilwenn, Mappaluk, Mekuaushkuan, Meluvia, Nadege Prestige, Nidehina, Nkulu Aimerence, Olizianne, Onyx Mbombo, Ophelia-Darling, Pastel, Pixel, Plamedie, Qullik, Raphdaelle, Richelieu Christina, Rissala, Sikuliaq, Sunrise, Taliittuq, Thanjana, Tuline, Ullusiurvik, Uppialuk, Videluna, Widchelle, Woulimata Hannah, Xiyao, Youvica, Zoe-ZinaAbischai Sardonyx, Alexandre Wapan, Bikyeombe Bienvenue, Bluesun, Chanmonyrith, Charlie Qumanguaq, Crizo, Dalzell, Edwight, Fritzlerson, Guntaz, Heavyd, Ittukallak, Ittuvik, Ivan Appalirak, Justgood, Karthigan, Kasudluak, Lebonheur, Lenny Bruce, Manhattan, Massabiel, Mckeen, Naavalan, New-York, Oceannic Sunchase, Omri-Kyanite, Pacifique, Peter Angutik, Quppapik, Reiki, Ro’nikonhrowa nen, Soho, Surusiluk, Thomas Qautsaalik, Tikwaachin, Tuukak, Upenak, Uyghur, Valmont, Waseskon, Wastuskun, Xandres, Ywaashtin, Zaphly, Zoubert

Some explanations/associations:

  • Aimerence means “love” in French.
  • Ange Lumiere means “angel of light”/”light angel” in French.
  • Angutik means “male” or “man” in Inuttut.
  • Bienvenue means “welcome” in French.
  • Croyance means “belief” in French.
  • Framboise means “raspberry” in French.
  • Heavyd…could it be a reference to rapper Heavy D? (Maybe just a variant of Heaven?)
  • Katsuak (or Katsuaq) means “biceps” in Inuit.
  • Kyanite is a type of mineral.
  • Lebonheur means “happiness” in French.
  • Lenny Bruce…is it a reference to comedian Lenny Bruce?
  • Mekuaushkuan means “the clouds are red at sunset” in Innu-aimun.
  • Plamedie is a contracted form of the French phrase plan merveilleux de Dieu, meaning “wonderful plan of God.”
  • Qullik (or Qulliq) means “oil lamp” in Inuit.
  • Qumanguaq is a mountain in Nunavut; the name means “the shrugging hill (no neck)” in Inuktitut.
  • Reiki is a type of energy healing that was developed in Japan.
  • Richelieu…is it a reference to Cardinal Richelieu?
  • Ro’nikonhrowa nen (or Ro’nikonhrowa:nen), which comes from a figure in Iroquois folklore, means “he who has ideas.”
  • Sardonyx is a type of banded gemstone.
  • Sikuliaq (pronounced see-KOO-lee-auk) means “young sea ice” in Inupiaq.
  • Soho, Manhattan, New-York — in this order, they form an address :)
  • Taliittuq may mean “no arm” in Inuit.
  • Tikwaachin means “autumn” in Cree.
  • Tuukak…I don’t know the definition, but a character named Tuukak appeared in a mid-2020 episode of the animated kids’ show Molly of Denali.
  • Uapikun means “flower” in Innu-aimun.
  • Ullusiurvik means “feast day” or “holy day” in Inuktitut.
  • Uppialuk means “snowy owl” in Inuktitut.
  • Uyghur…the Uyghurs are a Turkic ethnic group in China.
  • Wapan means “dawn” in Cree.
  • Waseskon may mean “blue” or “sky blue” in Cree. (The very similar Cree word Waseskun has been defined as: “the time just after a storm, when the dark clouds begin to part, the blue sky appears, and the first rays of sunlight shine through.”)
  • Ywaashtin may mean “calm” in Cree.

Sources:

Popular baby names in Paris, 2019

According to Paris Data, the most popular baby names in Paris, France, in 2019 were Louise and Gabriel.

Here are the city’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2019:

Girl Names

  1. Louise, 223 baby girls
  2. Jeanne, 195
  3. Emma, 180 (tie)
  4. Alice, 180 (tie)
  5. Chloé, 177
  6. Alma, 152
  7. Anna, 142
  8. Charlotte, 140
  9. Joséphine, 133 (tie)
  10. Adèle, 133 (tie)

Boy Names

  1. Gabriel, 371 baby boys
  2. Adam, 292
  3. Arthur, 282
  4. Raphaël, 272
  5. Louis, 271
  6. Mohamed, 213
  7. Victor, 187
  8. Léon, 181
  9. Paul, 180
  10. Isaac, 174 (tie)
  11. Joseph, 174 (tie)

In the girls’ top 10, Alma, Joséphine and Adèle replaced Rose, Léa, and Inès. (Notably, Joséphine jumped from 30th place — 97 baby girls — all the way into the top 10.)

In the boys’ top 10, Léon and Isaac/Joseph replaced Alexandre and Gaspard.

Finally, here’s a selection of names from elsewhere in the 2019 Paris data (which, like the SSA data, includes all names given to at least five babies per year).

Parisian Girl NamesParisian Boy Names
Apolline (80 girls), Garance (60), Aminata (55), Isaure (40), Castille (37), Ysée (29), Sixtine (17), Athénaïs (15), Prune (14), France (6), Ombeline (6)Octave (79 boys), Balthazar (37), Djibril (30), Aurélien (22), Hippolyte (21), Corentin (10), Matisse (9), Zéphyr (7), Tancrède (7), Enguerrand (6), Kaïss (5)

Source: Liste des prénoms – Paris Data

Popular baby names in Paris, 2016

According to Open Data Paris, the most popular baby names in Paris, France, in 2016 were Louise and Gabriel.

Here are the city’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2016:

Girl Names
1. Louise, 291 baby girls
2. Emma, 209
3. Alice, 208
4. Chloé, 179
5. Jeanne, 177
6. Inès, 166
7. Sarah, 163
8. Léa, 157
9. Charlotte, 145
10. Anna, 141

Boy Names
1. Gabriel, 370 baby boys
2. Adam, 353
3. Raphaël, 340
4. Louis, 275
5. Arthur, 247
6. Paul, 203
7. Alexandre, 197 (tie)
8. Victor, 197 (tie)
9. Mohamed, 184
10. Joseph, 175

The #1 names in 2015 were also Louise and Gabriel (…and Adam, tied with Gabriel).

In the girls’ top 10, Léa and Charlotte replaced Adèle and Juliette.

In the boys’ top 10, Joseph replaced Jules.

Source: Open Data Paris (via Maybe it is Daijirou)

Popular baby names in Paris, 2015

According to Open Data Paris, the most popular baby names in Paris, France, in 2015 were Louise and Adam/Gabriel (tie).

Here are the city’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2015:

Girl NamesBoy Names
1. Louise, 293 baby girls
2. Alice, 244
3. Chloé, 206
4. Emma, 178
5. Inès, 175
6. Sarah, 174
7. Jeanne, 173
8. Anna, 160
9. Adèle, 155
10. Juliette, 149
1. Adam, 355 baby boys (tie)
2. Gabriel, 355 (tie)
3. Raphaël, 320
4. Paul, 260
5. Louis, 256
6. Arthur, 245
7. Alexandre, 226
8. Victor, 208
9. Jules, 205
10. Mohamed, 185

In the girls’ top 10, Anna and Juliette replaced Camille and Lina.

In the boys’ top 10, Jules replaced Maxime.

The prénom mixte (unisex name) Charlie saw a dual-gender decline in 2015, “probably due to the association with the attacks in Charlie Hebdo in January.”

  • 2015: 29 girls and 6 boys named Charlie in Paris
  • 2014: 71 girls and 35 boys named Charlie in Paris
  • 2013: 75 girls and 37 boys named Charlie in Paris

Like the SSA data, the Paris data includes names used as seldom as 5 times per year. Here are some of the names from the bottom of the Paris rankings:

Uncommon Girl NamesUncommon Boy Names
Cléa, Clothilde, Dyna, Isée, Jane, Mélisande, Ornella, Romaïssa, Tasnime, WendyDemba, Ezio, Foucauld, Harold, Idrissa, Massyl, Sixte, Tidiane, Vianney, Yaya

Slightly higher up on the girls’ side I spotted Armance, used 6 times. It’s both a river in France and a romance novel by French writer Stendhal (born Marie-Henri Beyle).

Sources: Open Data Paris – Liste des prénoms 2004 à 2015, Les prénoms les plus donnés à Paris en 2015