How popular is the baby name Blasius in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Use the popularity graph and data table below to find out! Plus, see all the blog posts that mention the name Blasius.

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Popularity of the baby name Blasius


Posts that mention the name Blasius

Girl names that end with a Z-sound

Girl names that end with a Z-sound

In the U.S., most of the names given to baby girls end with a vowel sound. And many of the remaining names end with an N-sound.

So, what about girl names that end with other sounds?

Below is a selection of girl names that end with a Z-sound, regardless of last letter. The names are ordered by current popularity.

Eloise
An English form of the French name Héloïse, which may be derived from a Germanic name made up of elements meaning “healthy, whole” and “wide.” Here’s the popularity graph for Eloise.

Rose
From the type of flower. Here’s the popularity graph for Rose.

Collins
From the surname, which has various possible derivations. Here’s the popularity graph for Collins.

Liz
A nickname for Elizabeth. Here’s the popularity graph for Liz.

Inez
An English form of the Spanish name Inés. Here’s the popularity graph for Inez.

Aries
From the zodiacical constellation (whose name means “ram” in Latin). Here’s the popularity graph for Aries.

Hayes
From the surname, which has various possible derivations. Here’s the popularity graph for Hayes.

Primrose
From the type of flower. Here’s the popularity graph for Primrose.

Praise
From the English vocabulary word. Here’s the popularity graph for Praise.

Blaise
The French form of the Roman name Blasius, meaning “lisping.” Here’s the popularity graph for Blaise.

Melrose
From the Scottish surname, which is derived from a place name made up of elements meaning “bare” and “moor.” Here’s the popularity graph for Melrose.

Rivers
A variant of the English surname River, which has several possible derivations. Here’s the popularity graph for Rivers.

Jewels
A form of the name Jules influenced by the English word jewel. Here’s the popularity graph for Jewels.

Rawlings
A variant of the English surname Rawling, which is derived from the name Raul. Here’s the popularity graph for Rawlings.

Harnaaz
A Hindi name made up of elements meaning “every” and “pride.” Here’s the popularity graph for Harnaaz.


Less-common girl names that end with a Z-sound include Mills, Rhodes, Jazz, Ceres, Mumtaz, Rollins, and Turquoise.

Which of the above do you like most? What others can you think of?

P.S. Here are lists of girl names that end with D-, K-, L-, M-, R-, S-, T-, and V-sounds.

Sources: SSA, Behind the Name, Aries – Wiktionary

How did Coleman Blease influence baby names?

South Carolina politician Coleman Blease (1868-1942)
Coleman Blease

South Carolina politician (and “unrepentant white supremacist”) Coleman “Coley” Blease held various public offices from the 1890s to the 1930s. The year he had the biggest impact on baby names, though, was the year he became governor of the state: 1911.

That year, he was behind not one but two debuts in the U.S. baby name data.

First, there’s Blease (rhymes with “please”):

  • 1913: 20 baby boys named Blease – 19 born in S.C.
  • 1912: 12 baby boys named Blease – all born in S.C.
  • 1911: 8 baby boys named Blease [debut] – all born in S.C.
  • 1910: unlisted
  • 1909: unlisted

The surname Blease is likely a variant of Blaise, which can be traced back to the Latin name Blasius, meaning “lisping.”

Second, there’s Colie:

  • 1913: 16 baby boys named Colie – 8 born in S.C.
  • 1912: 23 baby boys named Colie – 21 born in S.C.
  • 1911: 16 baby boys named Colie [debut] – 8 born in S.C.
  • 1910: unlisted
  • 1909: unlisted

This alternate spelling of the Coley was the top debut name of the year, in fact.

The names Coley and Coleman also saw higher usage — particularly in South Carolina — during the early 1910s.

Finally, a number of babies were given first-middle combos that referred unmistakably to Coley Blease. Some examples:

What are your thoughts on these names?

Sources:

Image: Adapted from Coleman L. Blease (public domain)