How popular is the baby name Fair in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Fair.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Fair


Posts that Mention the Name Fair

Baby name story: Seeva Fair

chicago railroad fair guide book

Chicago Railroad Fair, which lasted from 1948 to 1949, commemorated 100 years of railroading in Chicago.

Dozens of railroads and railroad equipment manufacturers participated in the fair, which featured exhibits, reenactments, rides, musical shows, parades, and more.

One exhibit was an entire “Indian Village” created by the Santa Fe Railroad.

Santa Fe Railroad - Indian Village Sign

The village included tipis, hogans, a pueblo, an arts and crafts building, a medicine lodge and a trading post. (Here’s a map.)

The Santa Fe Railroad even brought in Hopi Indians from a reservation in Oraibi, Arizona, to live in the village and perform for fairgoers.

On September 23, 1949, a baby was born to Hopi parents Clara and Robert Lucas — described as a “blanket embroiderer” and a “doll maker,” respectively — in their one-room dwelling in the pueblo. (Their two older daughters were living there as well.)

The baby girl was named Seeva Fair Lucas. The name Seeva was derived from the Hopi word for railroad (one source says the full word is sivavö) and the middle name Fair effectively makes her name “Railroad Fair” — after the Chicago Railroad Fair.

Seeva’s parents also noted that the initials “S.F.” were a nod to the Santa Fe Railroad.

After the fair ended, the Lucas family returned to Arizona. Several newspapers mention Seeva’s 10th birthday party in 1959, and she attended high school in Holbrook, Arizona, in the mid-1960s.

(And here’s a cool fact: The Chicago Railroad Fair was one of the things that inspired Walt Disney in 1948 to draw up plans for the “Mickey Mouse Park” that eventually became Disneyland!)

Sources:

  • “Papoose Born at Fair Given Railroad Name.” Chicago Tribune 24 Sep. 1949: 12.

Image: AM05030 (Chicago Railroad Fair, 1949) by Joe+Jeanette Archie

One-Syllable Girl Names: Kate, Sage, Wren, Maeve

Looking for a girl name that’s short and to-the-point? Something that might work particularly well as a middle name?

Check out this list of several hundred one-syllable girl names. (And click on any name to see its popularity graph!)

Please note that I did include names in the gray area between one syllable and two syllables. The deciding factor on these particular names will be your own interpretation/accent, so be sure to test the names out loud before making any final decisions. (“Hayle,” for instance — would you say it like Hale, or like Hailey? Or “Rise” — is it rize, or ree-sah?)

Many of these names also happen to be unisex, so they appear on the One-Syllable Boy Names list as well.

What’s your favorite one-syllable girl name?

[Latest Update: June 2021]