How popular is the baby name Mattie in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Mattie.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Mattie


Posts that Mention the Name Mattie

Common Amish names: Jacob, Malinda, Benuel, Naomi

Amish man in a buggy

Which names are the most common among the Amish?

The simplest answer is “Biblical names,” but that’s not the full answer.

Because certain Biblical names are preferred over others, and Biblical names aren’t used exclusively.

Plus, the prevalence of a name could vary depending upon the specific Amish settlement you’re talking about.

I’ve gathered about 100 of the most common Amish names below. Before we get into specifics, though, here’s a bit of background on the Amish…

Who are the Amish?

The Amish are an Anabaptist group that intentionally maintain a degree of separation from the wider world. They wear plain clothing, eschew modern conveniences (like cars), and partake in traditional occupations such as farming, carpentry, blacksmithing, and (for women) homemaking.

The Anabaptist movement began in Europe in the 1520s, at the time of the Protestant Reformation. The Anabaptists were particularly known for the practice of adult baptism. They were also opposed to war, and they believed in the separation of church and state.

Considered radicals, the Anabaptists were widely persecuted.

In 1693, the Swiss branch of the Anabaptist movement (a.k.a., the Swiss Brethren) experienced a schism. Those who followed reformer Jacob Amman came to be known as the Amish, whereas those who did not came to be known as the Mennonites (after Dutchman Menno Simons, one of the original Anabaptist leaders).

In the early 1700s, many Amish (and Mennonites) immigrated to the New World — specifically to the Province of Pennsylvania, which had been founded upon the principle of religious freedom.

Today, over 367,000 Amish live in the U.S., and roughly two-thirds of them reside in three states: Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana.

Amish men and women.

Common Amish names

The most comprehensive source of Amish names I came across was also the oldest, so let’s go through all the sources chronologically.

In 1960, researcher Elmer L. Smith published data on the most common male and female names among the Amish of southeastern Pennsylvania from 1890 to 1956.

The 1,337 Amish males in the study shared a total of just 72 different first names. Over a quarter of the males had one of the top three names (John, Amos, or Jacob), and over 81% had one of the top 20 names.

The 1,356 Amish females in the study shared even fewer first names: only 55. Over a quarter of the females had one of the top three names (Mary, Sarah, or Annie), and over 88% had a top-20 name.

According to Smith’s research, these were the 20 most common names per gender (plus their frequency of usage):

Amish female namesAmish male names
1Mary, 10.0%John, 11.9%
2Sarah, 7.9%Amos, 7.3%
3Annie, 9.1%*Jacob, 6.5%
4Katie, 7.1%David, 6.4%
5Lizzie, 6.4%Samuel, 6.2%
6Rebecca, 6.1%Christian, 6.1%
7Fannie, 5.3%Daniel, 5.5%
8Barbara, 5.1%Benjamin, 3.8%
9Rachel, 5.1%Levi, 3.7%
10Lydia, 4.9%Aaron, 3.1%
11Emma, 3.8%Jonas, 3.0%
12Malinda, 3.5%Elam, 2.8%
13Susie, 3.2%Stephen, 2.8%
14Sadie, 2.5%Isaac, 2.5%
15Leah, 1.9%Henry, 2.4%
16Hannah, 1.5%Jonathan, 1.8%
17Naomi, 1.4%Eli, 1.7%
18Mattie, 1.3%Gideon, 1.6%
19Lavina, 1.1%Moses, 1.5%
20Arie, 1.1%Joseph, 1.1%
*Annie was ranked below Sarah in the research paper, but this seems to be a typo, given the percentages.

Smith also wrote the following:

Other given names for males may reflect the important place the martyred forefathers hold in the minds of the sect members. The given name Menno is frequently found; this honors Menno Simmons [sic] an early leader of the plain sects. Ammon is also quite common, and is traced to Jacob Amman for whom the Amish sect is named; otherwise given names are from the Bible.

(Menno, a form of the Dutch name Meine, can be traced back to the Old High German word magan, meaning “strength.” The occupational surname Amman(n), which was derived from the German word amtmann, originally referred to someone employed as an official or administrator.)

A couple of years after Smith’s study came out, Dr. William Schreiber (a professor at the College of Wooster in Ohio) published a book about the Amish of east-central Ohio. In one paragraph, he mentioned some of the names he’d encountered:

One learns here that the good old biblical names are still common with the Amish but are in competition with modern or more euphonious ones. The names of the children of large families are often a study in contrasts. In one family there are, for example, Benjamin, Samuel, Isaac, Stephen, John, Israel, Christ, Barbara, Mary, Hannah, Annie, Mattie, and Lizzie. Another family has chosen these names for its children: Sarah, Lizzie, Samuel, Benjamin, John, Annie, Marie, Daniel, David, Enos, Sylvia, and Malinda. Then there are three Amish brothers named Isaac, Levi, and Elmer. One wonders how Vesta, Delila, Dena, Saloma, Drusilla, or Verba, or boys’ names like Junie, Venus, or Aquilla came into strict Christian families?

Speaking of east-central Ohio, Barbara Yoder Hall — who was born in 1940 and grew up with ten siblings in the Amish community of Holmes County — recalled in her book Born Amish (1980) the following first names:

First names for girls are usually Cora, Mattie, Annie, Lizzie, Barbara, Fannie, Katie, Mary, Naomi, Emma, Jemima, Ella, Sarah, Levina and Mandy.

First names for boys are John, Mose, Ferdinand, Dannie, Sam, Amos, Albert, Emanual, Levi, Rudy, Enos, Eli, Jacob and Joseph.

Amish men in a wagon.

Now for a pair of sources from the digital age…

The website Amish America, run by Erik Wesner (who is not Amish, but has visited Amish communities in 15 different states), lists the following names as being common among the Amish. He found many of the male names in Raber’s Almanac, which “contains a listing of Amish church ministers,” while many of the female names came from various church directories.

Common Amish female namesCommon Amish male names
Elizabeth
Emma
Fannie
Hannah
Katie
Linda
Lizzie
Lovina/Lavina
Martha
Mary
Miriam
Naomi
Rebecca
Ruby
Ruth
Sadie
Sarah
Waneta
Abram
Amos
Atlee
Eli
Elmer
Harley
Isaac
Jacob
John
Lavern
Leroy
Mark
Melvin
Mervin
Samuel
Vernon
Wayne
Willis

Some of Erik’s commentary…

  • Eli: “You see a lot of Elis among Amish, but not many Elijahs.”
  • Leroy: “Seems to be more common in Midwestern communities.”
  • Lizzie: “Lizzie is a popular form in some Pennsylvania communities.”
  • Naomi: “Amish, at least in Lancaster County, pronounce this ‘Nay-oh-mah.'”
  • Ruby: “Quite a few Rubies in northern Indiana.”
  • Vernon: “[P]retty common in places like northern Indiana and Holmes County, Ohio.”

Finally, according to the blog Amish Heritage, written by a woman named Anna (who grew up Amish in Pennsylvania), common Amish names include…

Common Amish female namesCommon Amish male names
Amanda
Anna/Annie
Barbara
Betty
Clara
Edna
Elizabeth
Esther
Fannie
Hannah
Lavina
Lena
Lydia
Malinda
Martha
Mary
Miriam
Naomi
Priscilla
Rachel
Rebecca
Ruth
Sadie
Sarah
Susie
Aaron
Abner
Abram
Amos
Benuel
Christian/Christ
Daniel
David
Eli
Elmer
Emmanuel
Henry
Isaac
Jacob
John
Jonas
Leroy
Lloyd
Mark
Melvin
Mervin
Moses
Omar
Paul
Samuel
Steven/Stephen
Vernon

Both websites noted that some Amish communities (particularly New Order Amish communities) have recently started giving their children less traditional first names.


So how do these lists square with what we’ve observed in the U.S. baby name data?

It’s hard to tell with historically popular names like Mary and John, but we can see some interesting things when we focus on relatively rare names.

For instance, the names Atlee, Benuel, Delila, Dena, Lavina, Menno, Saloma, and Willis have all been mentioned recently in my posts about names with a high degree of state specificity (2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021). As you’d expect, they were associated with the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, and/or Indiana. (Benuel, in fact, has only ever appeared in the Pennsylvania data — going all the way back to the 1940s.)

Several of the other names — including Amos, Elam, Fannie, Malinda, and Mervin — saw higher usage in Pennsylvania than in any other state in 2021.

I was surprised that none of my sources listed the name Barbie. Most of them mentioned Barbara (one of them was even named Barbara), and all of them included nicknames (like Lizzie). But Barbara’s diminutive form was curiously absent — even though most of its usage occurs in Pennsylvania:

Girls named Barbie, U.S.Girls named Barbie, Penn.
20213722 (59%)
20202617 (65%)
20193320 (61%)
20182113 (62%)
20172916 (55%)
20162814 (50%)

Rhoda and Mahlon are two more names that I somewhat expected to see.

Ammon is a very interesting case, because the name also has significance to an entirely different religious group: the Mormons. (The Book of Mormon features two prominent figures named Ammon.) From the 1910s to the 1960s, the name Ammon — much like Benuel — only appeared in the Pennsylvania data. Since the 1980s, though, the state with the largest number of baby boys named Ammon has been Utah.


What are your thoughts on the first names used by the Amish? Which of the above do you like the most?

And, for anyone out there with close ties to an Amish family/community: What other names would you add to this list?

P.S. This post is dedicated to my delightful commenters alex and Andrea. :)

Sources:

Images by Chris Chow from Unsplash, Amyd from Pixabay, and Clark Young from Unsplash

Name quotes #105: Barra, Dhani, Hellion

double quotation mark

From comedian Ali Wong’s 2016 stand-up special Ali Wong: Baby Cobra (vid):

I’m just waiting for the right moment to, like, become a housewife, financially, you know? I want my husband to get us to, like, a certain point financially. I wanna get to the point as a couple where I can comfortably afford sliced mango. Know what I’m talking about? I’m talking about that Whole Foods mango. That $10-a-box Whole Foods mango that was sliced by white people. That’s the kind of income bracket I’m striving for. That’s when you know you’ve made it, when you’re eating mango that was sliced by a dude named Noah. I want Noah mango, Rebecca kiwi, Danielle pineapple.

From an article about how Storm Barra (which hit the UK and Ireland in December of 2021) came to be named after BBC Northern Ireland weatherman Barra Best:

‘What happened was the head of Irish weather service Met Eireann called me in August and asked me where my name was from and I thought it was a bit strange, I didn’t know why she was asking,’ [Barra Best] told the BBC’s Evening Extra programme.

‘It comes from the south-west of Ireland from Finbarr, St Finbarr in Co Cork and it’s derived from that.’

He continued: ‘She said oh that’s fine, that’s fine. I asked why did you want to know and she said oh you’ll find out in about a month.

‘Of course the email came out and the list of names were announced and she had decided to put my name in there.’

On the origin of the name of George Harrison’s son, Dhani, from The Beatles Encyclopedia (2014) by Kenneth Womack:

Born on August 1, 1978, in Windsor, England, Dhani Harrison is the only son of Harrison and his second wife Olivia Trinidad Arias. His unusual name is a composite of the sixth and seventh notes of the Indian music scale — “dha” and “ni.”

From a 2012 interview with actor Crispin Glover, who goes by his full name, Crispin Hellion Glover, as a filmmaker:

SP: When did you begin using ‘Hellion’ as part of your name? Why the addition?

CHG: I began using “Hellion” as my middle name at birth. I was born in New York. Not too long before I was born, my parents went to see an off-Broadway production of Henry V, by Shakespeare and liked the production very much, and liked the name [Crispin, from the St. Crispin’s Day Speech] so [they] gave it to me. My father’s middle name is Herbert. He never liked his middle name Herbert. So as a young struggling actor in New York he would say to himself, “I am Bruce H. Glover, Bruce Hellion Glover. I am a hellion, a troublemaker.” And that would make him feel good. He told my mother this was his real middle name. When they were married she saw him writing on the marriage certificate Bruce Herbert Glover and she thought, “Who am I marrying?” They gave Hellion to me as my real middle name. I had always written and drawn as a child and I would always sign my drawing and writing with my whole name Crispin Hellion Glover. When I started acting professionally at 13, which was something I had decided on my own I could do as a profession at a relatively young age, it became apparent that I had to choose a professional acting name for SAG. I thought my whole name was too long for acting and just used my first and last name. When I started publishing my books I simply continued using the name I had always used for writing and drawing and had put in my books. This is also why I use my whole name for my own films.

On the origin of Harry S. Truman’s given names, from the book Truman (1992) by David McCullough:

In a quandary over a middle name, [parents] Mattie and John were undecided whether to honor her father or his. In the end they compromised with the letter S. It could be taken to stand for Solomon or Shipp, but actually stood for nothing, a practice not unknown among the Scotch-Irish, even for first names. The baby’s first name was Harry, after his Uncle Harrison.

(Ulysses S. Grant likewise had a single-letter middle.)

From an article about the increasing popularity of Maori baby names in New Zealand, published in The Guardian (found via Clare’s tweet):

Damaris Coulter of Ngati Kahu descent and Dale Dice of Ngati Hine, Te Aupouri and Nga Puhi [descent] […] [gave] their one-year-old daughter Hinekorako just one name, as was usual pre-colonisation.

Hinekorako’s name came to Dice as he was navigating a waka, a large traditional Maori sailing vessel, from Rarotonga in the Cook Islands back to Aotearoa. “It was coming up to midnight. We came into a little storm. The temperature had dropped … there was thunder … Once we got through the storm we all turned around and just behind us there was this massive white rainbow … It was a lunar rainbow.”

“I told our navigator about it and he goes’ “oh yeah, that’s a tohu (sign), that’s Hinekorako’.” In myth, Hinekorako is also a taniwha (a water spirit), who lives between the spirit and living worlds. Dice wrote the name in his diary and decided that night, were he to ever have a daughter, she would be named Hinekorako.

(According to Encyclopedia Mythica, Hine-korako is “the personification of the lunar bow or halo.”)

Old-fashioned double names: Loladean, Ivylee, Effielou

old-fashioned double names

A few weeks ago, I got an email from a reader looking for lists of old-fashioned double names. She was aiming for names like Thelma Dean, Eula Mae, and Gaynell — names that would have sounded trendy in the early 1900s. She also mentioned that she’d started a list of her own.

So I began scouring the interwebs. I tracked down lists of old-fashioned names, and lists of double names…but I couldn’t find a decent list of double names that were also old-fashioned.

I loved the idea of such a list, though, so I suggested that we work together to create one. She generously sent me the pairings she’d collected so far, and I used several different records databases to find many more.

I restricted my search to names given to girls born in the U.S. from 1890 to 1930. I also stuck to double names that I found written as single names, because it’s very likely that these pairings were used together in real life (i.e., that they were true double names and not merely first-middle pairings).

Pairings that seemed too timeless, like Maria Mae and Julia Rose, were omitted. I also took out many of the pairings that feature now-trendy names — think Ella, Emma, and Lucy — because they just don’t sound old-fashioned anymore (though they would have a few decades ago).

The result isn’t exhaustive, but it’s a decent sampling of real-life, old-fashioned double names. I’ve organized them by second name, and I also added links to popularity graphs for names that were in the SSA data during the correct time period (early 1900s).

*

-Ann(e)

Abbyanne, Agnesann, Aliceanne, Bessanne, Bettyann/Bettyanne, Cassanne, Claraanne, Coraanne, Dellaanne, Dollyanne, Dorisann, Dorothyann, Doveanne, Ethelanne, Faeanne, Floyanne, Franceanne, Gayanne, Georgeann/Georgeanne, Gracyanne, Gustyanne, Helenann, Hopeanne, Idaanne, Ivaanne, Jeanann, Jessanne, Joyanne, Judyanne, Katyanne, Lizanne, Lizzyanne, Loisann, Louann/Louanne, Louisaanne, Maeanne, Margaretann, Metaanne, Mollyanne, Nancyann, Nellyanne, Oliveanne, Opalann, Patsyanne, Pattyanne, Phyllisann, Pollyann, Prudyanne, Rayanne, Roseann/Roseanne, Rosyanne, Roxieanne, Royanne, Rueanne, Ruthann/Ruthanne, Shirleyann, Sallyann, Sueanne, Susyanne, Tobyanne, Tommyanne

-Bell(e)

Adabelle, Addiebelle, Altabelle, Anjabell, Annebelle, Anniebell/Anniebelle, Archiebell, Artybelle, Augustabelle, Beckybell, Berthabelle, Bessybell, Bettybell, Beulahbelle, Birdiebelle, Bonniebell, Cassbelle, Clairbelle, Clarabell/Clarabelle, Claybelle, Cleobelle, Conniebell, Corabell/Corabelle, Cordiebell, Corybelle, Danniebell, Dolliebelle, Donnabell/Donnabelle, Dottiebell, Eddybelle, Ednabell, Edrisbell, Effiebelle, Elizabelle, Ellenbelle, Elsiebelle, Essiebell, Esterbelle, Ethelbelle, Ettabelle, Evabelle, Fannybelle, Faybelle, Fernbell, Florabell/Florabelle, Florbell, Flossiebell, Floybell, Frankiebell, Fredybell, Gaybell, Geniebell, Georgiabell, Georgiebelle, Glennabelle, Goldenbell, Gradybelle, Hattybelle, Hazelbell, Hughbell, Idabell/Idabelle, Inezbelle, Indiabelle, Ingabelle, Iscahbell, Ivybelle, Janiebelle, Jaybelle, Jessbell, Jessiebelle, Jewelbell, Jodiebell, Joebell, Johnybell, Jonibell, Jorybelle, Josiebell, Joybell, Junebell, Kaybelle, Kittybelle, Kizzybell, Ladybell, Leahbelle, Leebelle, Lenabelle, Leonabell, Leotabell, Lettybelle, Lizzybelle, Loubelle, Lulabell/Lulabelle, Lulubelle, Lydabell, Lydiabelle, Madgebell, Maebell/Maebelle/Maybell/Maybelle, Maggybell, Mamiebell, Mandybell, Marabelle, Marthabell, Marybell/Marybelle/Maribell/Maribelle, Mattybell, Maudebell, Meadowbelle, Minniebell, Monabell, Myrtlebelle, Nanniebell, Nelliebelle, Nettybell, Nevabelle, Ninabelle, Nitabell, Norabelle, Novabell, Pinkiebell, Pollybelle, Odiebelle, Olabell, Olivebelle, Olliebelle, Orabell/Orabelle, Orphabelle, Queeniebelle, Raybelle, Rebabelle, Rheabelle, Rhodabelle, Ritabelle, Romabelle, Rosabell/Rosabelle, Rosebell/Rosebelle, Rosiebell, Rossbelle, Roybelle, Rudybell, Ruebelle, Sadiebelle, Sallybell, Suebell, Tenniebell, Tessabelle, Tessiebelle, Theabell, Theobelle, Troybell, Trudybell, Verabelle, Verdabell, Vernabelle, Vonniebelle, Wendybell, Wilbabell, Willabell/Willabelle, Willowbell, Willybell, Winniebelle

(…and don’t forget Cowbelle!)

-Bess

Adabess, Anitabess, Annabess, Anniebess, Clarabess, Cristabess, Donnabess, Drewbess, Ellebess, Euniebess, Florabess, Hallibess, Henribess, Hildabess, Idabess, Ilabess, Inabess, Jeanebess, Lanibess, Larabess, Laydebess, Leebess, Lelabess, Lonabess, Lulabess, Lurabess, Maebess, Malabess, Mamebess, Maribess, Marionbess, Marthabess, Maybess, Minabess, Nonabess, Norabess, Orabess, Rosebess, Sarabess, Theobess, Willabess, Zellebess

-Dean

Adadean, Albadean, Almadean, Alphadean, Altadean, Altheadean, Arizadean, Belvadean, Bertadean, Berthadean, Claradean, Claredean, Claydean, Cleatadean, Delladean, Deltadean, Dessadean, Doradean, Ellendean, Elvadean, Ermadean, Ettadean, Evadean, Evedean, Faydean, Floydean, Glendadean, Glendean, Glennadean, Gloriadean, Idadean, Irmadean, Ivadean, Jessadean, Jeweldean, Joydean, Leedean, Leliadean, Loladean, Loradean, Loudean, Luradean, Maedean/Maydean, Maradean, Marthadean, Marvadean, Melbadean, Melvadean, Nedradean, Nelladean, Nettydean, Noladean, Normadean, Olgadean, Oradean, Orbadean, Ouidadean, Rebadean, Rheadean, Rosadean, Rubydean, Ruedean, Suedean, Thelmadean, Velmadean, Vernadean, Veradean, Vivadean, Wandadean, Willadean, Williedean, Willowdean, Wilmadean, Zelmadean

-Dell(e)

Abbiedell, Adadell, Alicedell, Annadell, Anniedell, Archiedell, Barbiedell, Bertdell, Berthadell, Bonniedell, Chloedell, Christadell, Claradelle, Corydell, Deedell, Earthadell, Edithdell, Effiedell, Elizadell, Ermadell, Essiedell, Esterdell, Euradell, Evadell, Evedell, Faydelle, Ferndell, Flodell, Floydell, Frankiedell, Fredadell, Gaydell, Glorydell, Hannahdell, Hattiedell, Hazeldell, Hessiedell, Hopedell, Hughdell, Idadell, Irmadell, Ivadell/Ivadelle, Ivydell, Jessiedell, Jimidell, Joedell, Joydell, Junedell, Katedell, Katydell, Leahdelle, Ledadell, Leedell, Leniedell, Lizdell, Lizziedelle, Loudell, Luludell, Maedell/Maedelle/Maydell/Maydelle, Mamiedelle, Mardgedell, Margiedell, Marthadell, Marydell/Maridell, Minniedell, Moedell, Noradell, Ociedell, Odadell, Oladell, Olgadell, Olivedell, Olliedell, Opaldell, Oradell, Ouidadell, Patriciadell, Raydell, Rosadell, Rubiedell, Ruedell, Ruthdell, Ruthiedell, Suedell, Vaughndell, Vidadell, Walterdelle, Wandadelle, Winniedell, Zoedell

-Donna

Alphadonna, Altadonna, Auradonna, Belledonna, Bonadonna, Claydonna, Cleodonna, Faedonna, Frandonna, Freydonna, Gaydonna, Glendonna, Irisdonna, Joedonna, Leadonna, Leedonna, Loudonna, Maedonna, Maridonna, Mariedonna, Marydonna, Maydonna, Myradonna, Raydonna, Roydonna, Rubydonna, Thoradonna

-Gay(e)

Alliegay, Almagay, Annagay, Anniegay, Ardiegay, Billiegay, Claragay, Ermagay, Floragay, Halliegay, Hildagay, Leilagay, Lunagay, Lydagay, Marygay, Milliegay, Nelliegay, Nevagay, Nidagay, Olagay, Olligay, Ornagay, Ozellagay, Roxygay, Stellagay, Velmagay, Verlagay, Wandagay, Williegay

-Jean

Abbiejean, Albajean, Alicejean, Almajean, Alphajean, Annajean, Beaulahjean, Beckyjean, Belvajean, Berniejean, Berthajean, Bessiejean, Bettyjean, Bobbiejean, Bonniejean, Caroljean, Clydajean, Corajean, Darajean, Daviejean, Donnajean, Eddyjean, Edithjean, Effiejean, Elsajean, Ermajean, Ettajean, Eulahjean, Evajean, Evejean, Fayejean, Florajean, Floyjean, Glennajean, Harlyjean, Hildajean, Idajean, Ivajean, Josiejean, Katejean, Kayjean, Leahjean, Leejean, Lilajean, Loisjean, Lottiejean, Loujean, Lurajean, Maejean, Marahjean, Margyjean, Marthajean, Martiejean, Maryjean/Marijean, Maudejean, Melbajean, Mickeyjean, Missiejean, Mirajean, Molliejean, Myrajean, Neldajean, Nelliejean, Normajean, Novajean, Nylajean, Olgajean, Olivejean, Olliejean, Orajean, Raejean, Rebajean, Rheajean, Ritajean, Romajean, Rosejean, Rubyjean, Ruthjean, Shirleyjean, Suejean, Thedajean, Thelmajean, Unajean, Vedajean, Velmajean, Verajean, Vernajean, Vestajean, Wandajean, Willajean, Willowjean, Wilmajean, Winniejean

-Lee

Almalee, Andylee, Annalee, Annielee, Artylee, Asalee, Avalee, Bertalee, Berthalee, Besslee, Berthalee, Bettylee, Claylee, Coralee, Cordylee, Danylee, Davylee, Dellalee, Dollylee, Doralee, Dorislee, Effylee, Elmalee, Ermalee, Ethellee, Eulalee, Evalee, Fannylee, Fayelee, Floralee, Flossielee, Floylee, Georgialee, Glendalee, Glorialee, Gustalee, Harvylee, Hopelee, Idalee, Ingalee, Irmalee, Ivalee, Ivylee, Jesslee, Joylee, Junelee, Kathylee, Katylee, Maelee, Maralee, Margylee, Marthalee, Marylee, Mattielee, Melbalee, Mildredlee, Minalee, Minnielee, Miriamlee, Myrtlelee, Nancylee, Nolalee, Noralee, Normalee, Omalee, Onalee, Oralee, Orphalee, Ovalee, Patsylee, Pattylee, Percylee, Pollylee, Pruelee, Raelee, Rebalee, Rosalee, Roselee, Roseylee, Rosielee/Rosilee, Roxylee, Roylee, Rubylee, Ruelee, Ruthlee, Sallylee, Thelmalee, Trilbylee, Velmalee, Veralee, Verbalee, Vernalee, Vernelee, Virgielee, Virginialee, Wandalee, Willowlee, Winnylee, Zelmalee

-Lou

Addylou, Albalou, Andylou, Annalou, Annielou, Archielou, Bertalou, Berthalou, Bessielou, Bettelou, Bettylou, Billylou, Birdielou, Bonnielou, Daralou, Dellalou, Dixielou, Doralou, Dulcialou, Eddielou, Ednalou, Effielou, Eliselou, Emmylou, Essielou, Ettalou, Evalou, Evielou, Fannielou, Floralou, Frankielou, Genelou, Gerdylou, Gracielou, Gretalou, Gussielou, Hannalou, Hattielou, Idalou, Iralou, Irmalou, Ivalou, Ivylou, Janelou, Jennalou, Jesselou, Jimmielou, Joelou, Johnnielou, Joylou, Katelou, Lannylou, Leelou, Lindylou, Lizzielou, Lolalou, Maelou, Mamielou, Maralou, Margylou, Marjorielou, Marthalou, Marylou/Marilou, Mattielou, Maxielou, Minnielou, Myralou, Myrtlelou, Nannielou, Nellielou, Nettielou, Nitalou, Noralou, Oralou, Patsylou, Pattilou, Paulalou, Phoebelou, Rebalou, Rhealou, Ritalou, Robertalou, Rosalou, Roselou, Sallylou, Shirleylou, Suelou, Thoralou, Tomielou, Vernalou, Victorinelou, Wanzalou, Willalou, Willilou, Willowlou, Winnielou, Zettalou

-Mae

Addiemae, Alicemae, Algymae, Alicemae, Alphamae, Altamae, Altheamae, Anitamae, Annamae, Anniemae, Artymae, Audymae, Bellemae, Berthamae, Bertiemae, Bessmae, Bessymae, Bettymae, Biddymae, Billiemae, Birdyemae, Carlamae, Chloemae, Clairemae, Claramae, Claymae, Clydamae, Coramae, Cordymae, Corrimae, Davymae, Dellamae, Dinamae, Dolliemae, Donnamae, Doramae, Dorothymae, Eddiemae, Ednamae, Effiemae, Elizamae, Elodymae, Elsiemae, Ermamae, Essiemae, Esthermae, Ethelmae, Ettamae, Eulamae, Evamae, Evemae, Fanniemae, Faymae, Floramae, Flossiemae, Floymae, Fredimae, Friedamae, Genemae, Georgiamae, Gertiemae, Glorymae, Goldymae, Gussymae, Hattiemae, Heddymae, Helenmae, Henrymae, Hollimae, Idamae, Irmamae, Ivymae, Jennymae, Jerrymae, Jessamae, Jessmae, Jessiemae, Joemae, Johnniemae, Jonimae, Joymae, Junemae, Katheemae, Ladymae, Leemae, Lenamae, Leotamae, Lilamae, Lizamae, Lizziemae, Loismae, Lolamae, Lorettamae, Lottiemae, Lulamae, Lulumae, Luramae, Lydiamae, Mandymae, Margymae, Marymae, Mattimae, Melbamae, Mollymae, Myrtlemae, Neldamae, Nelliemae, Nettiemae, Nolamae, Normamae, Olamae, Olgamae, Olivemae, Olliemae, Oramae, Panzymae, Peggymae, Phebemae, Raymae, Rebamae, Rheamae, Rhodamae, Ritamae, Rosamae, Rosemae, Roymae, Rubimae, Ruemae, Ruthiemae, Ruthmae, Shirleymae, Suemae, Sulamae, Susiemae, Sylviamae, Templemae, Theamae, Tommimae, Trilbymae, Trudymae, Veramae, Vermamae, Vernamae, Vestamae, Vidamae, Violamae, Virginiamae, Wandamae, Wilbamae, Willamae, Williemae, Winniemae, Willowmae, Zaidamae, Zellamae

-Nell(e)

Adanell, Albanell, Angienell, Annanelle, Annienell, Archienell, Asanell, Avanell/Avanelle, Bessienell, Berthanell, Bethnell, Birdnell, Claranell, Clarenelle, Claudianell, Cloranell, Deenell, Dessanell, Dovienell, Druenell, Ermanell, Ernienell, Esternell, Eudanell, Evanell/Evanelle, Evenell, Faynell, Floranell, Florencenell, Flonell, Fredanell, Gaynell/Gaynelle, Genenell, Glorianell, Gracenell, Gusternell, Hassienell, Idanell, Ineznell, Ivanell/Ivanelle, Jaenell, Janenell, Jessienell, Jimmienell, Joenell, Johnnienell, Juvianell, Kathienell, Leahnell, Leenell, Lennienell, Liznell, Lounell, Maenell, Maranell, Margienell, Marinelle, Marjorienell, Marthanell, Marynell, Mattienell, Maxinlle, Mayenell, Melbanell, Monanell, Myranell, Nettienell, Noranell, Oranell, Ouidanell, Ovianell, Patsyenell, Raenell, Raynelle, Rebanell, Ritanell, Robbienell, Rosanell, Rosenelle, Rosienell, Rossnell, Roznell, Ruenelle, Ruthnell, Sammienell, Suenell, Thedanell, Tommienell, Tressienell, Verbanell, Verdanell, Verdianell, Vergienell, Wandanell, Wanzanell, Willienell, Willownell, Winnienell, Zoenell

-Rose

Adarose, Albarose, Alicerose, Althearose, Anitarose, Annarose, Ardithrose, Arvarose, Bellerose, Bertharose, Betseyrose, Bettyrose, Billyrose, Cathrose, Clararose, Corarose, Deerose, Delrose, Dollyrose, Dorarose, Dorisrose, Elsarose, Elsierose, Emmyrose, Ermarose, Ethelrose, Ettarose, Eulalirose, Evarose, Everose, Fannyrose, Fayrose, Florarose, Francisrose, Fridarose, Generose, Gladysrose, Glenrose, Glennarose, Goldarose, Hattierose, Hildarose, Huldarose, Idarose, Inezrose, Irmarose, Ivarose, Juneorse, Leerose, Leorose, Louiserose, Lydarose, Maerose/Mayrose, Mardirose, Margirose, Martharose, Maryrose, Melbarose, Melvarose, Minarose, Minnierose, Moerose, Myrnarose, Nellyrose, Nelrose, Neldarose, Nellierose, Nettarose, Nitarose, Oliverose, Ollierose, Patsyrose, Peggyrose, Phillirose, Phoeberose, Rhearose, Ritarose, Robbierose, Rubyrose, Ruthrose, Shirleyrose, Suerose, Thearose, Thelmarose, Tommyrose, Unarose, Velmarose, Verarose, Vernarose, Virdiarose, Wildarose, Willirose, Wylmarose, Zelmarose, Zetarose

-Ruth

Abbyruth, Adaruth, Adeleruth, Aggieruth, Agnesruth, Aliceruth, Almaruth, Alpharuth, Altaruth, Andieruth, Annieruth, Asterruth, Belleruth, Bertaruth, Bessieruth, Bettieruth, Bettyruth, Billieruth, Bonnieruth, Clararuth, Clareruth, Dellaruth, Dollyruth, Donnaruth, Doraruth, Dorisruth, Dorothyruth, Eddieruth, Ednaruth, Effieruth, Eliseruth, Ellenruth, Elvaruth, Estelleruth, Ettaruth, Evaruth, Fayruth, Floraruth, Francesruth, Fridaruth, Georgiaruth, Gladysruth, Gretaruth, Hazelruth, Helenruth, Hildaruth, Idaruth, Irmaruth, Ivaruth, Janeruth, Jeanruth, Jennieruth, Jennyruth, Jesseruth, Jimmiruth, Joeruth, Johnieruth, Joyruth, Judyruth, Juneruth, Katyruth, Kayruth, Ledaruth, Leeruth, Leonaruth, Lilaruth, Loisruth, Louruth, Lucyruth, Mabelruth, Maeruth, Mamieruth, Mararuth, Margieruth, Maryruth, Maxiruth, Mazieruth, Millieruth, Minnieruth, Mollyruth, Monaruth, Myraruth, Nannieruth, Naomiruth, Nellruth, Ninaruth, Nomaruth, Noraruth, Nydaruth, Olgaruth, Omegaruth, Oraruth, Ornaruth, Patsyruth, Pattieruth, Pollyruth, Raeruth, Ritaruth, Roseruth, Rubyruth, Sadieruth, Sueruth, Velmaruth, Veraruth, Verdaruth, Vernaruth, Virginiaruth, Vivianruth, Wandaruth, Wildaruth, Willaruth, Willieruth, Woodieruth

(…and here’s a double name followed by a triple name: Sueruth Ettajoanne Lavell, born in 1927 in California.)

-Sue

Abbysue, Annasue, Annysue, Arnisue, Benniesue, Bertasue, Bessiesue, Bethsue, Bettinasue, Bettisue, Bettysue, Billysue, Birdiesue, Bonniesue, Cathrynsue, Clairsue, Clarasue, Claysue, Clemiesue, Corasue, Danasue, Dellasue, Delsue, Donniesue, Eddysue, Edensue, Eddiesue, Ednasue, Effiesue, Ellysue, Ethelsue, Evasue, Fannysue, Faysue, Fransue, Fredasue, Genesue, Glendasue, Hannasue, Helensue, Hestersue, Homersue, Idasue, Indasue, Irasue, Ivasue, Jennasue, Jensue, Jillisue, Johnsue, Jonisue, Joysue, Karlasue, Katiesue, Kittysue, Linnisue, Lornasue, Lousue, Lydiasue, Marthasue, Marysue, Maysue, Mattisue, Merlesue, Mildredsue, Millisue, Molliesue, Monasue, Myrasue, Nancysue, Nansue, Nellisue, Nevasue, Ninasue, Normsue, Olliesue, Orasue, Orvasue, Patsysue, Pattiesue, Petrasue, Phillipsue, Ramonasue, Rheasue, Rhodasue, Robsue, Rubysue, Valdasue, Verasue, Vernasue, Vinasue, Virginiasue, Vyrlasue, Wandasue, Wendysue, Wildasue, Willasue, Williesue, Winisue, Zadasue

Make Your Own!

I spotted plenty of other combinations that just didn’t happen to be written as single names in the records, so here’s a handy dandy little table to cover some of the other existing combinations…

First Name Second Name
Abbie/Abby, Ada, Addie/Addy, Aggie, Agnes, Alba, Alice, Alma, Alpha, Alta, Andie/Andy, Anna/Annie, Belle, Berta/Bertha, Bessie/Bessy, Betsy, Bettie/Betty, Billie/Billy, Birdie, Bonnie, Clair/Clare, Clara, Clio/Cleo, Cora, Dee, Della, Dolly/Dollie, Dora, Doris, Dorothy, Eddie/Eddy, Edna, Effie, Eliza, Ellen, Elsie, Elva, Estelle, Ethel, Etta, Eula, Eva, Eve, Fae/Fay(e), Fanny/Fannie, Floy, Flora, Frances, Frida/Freda, Freddie, Gene, Georgia, Gladys, Glenda, Glenna, Glory, Golda, Goldie, Greta, Hattie/Hatty, Hazel, Helen, Hilda, Ida, Inez, Irma/Erma, Iva, Jane, Jean, Jennie/Jenny, Jesse/Jessie, Jimmie/Jimmy, Joe, Johnnie, Joy, Judy, June, Kate, Katie/Katy, Kay(e), Kitty/Kittie, Leda, Lee, Lena, Leona, Lila, Liz/Lizzie, Lois, Lola, Lou, Lula, Lydia, Mabel, Mae/May(e), Maisie/Mazie, Mamie, Mara, Margie, Martha, Mattie, Maxie, Melba, Millie, Minnie, Molly/Mollie, Mona, Myra, Myrna, Nannie, Nell(e), Nellie/Nelly, Nettie, Nita, Nola, Nora, Norma, Nyda, Ola, Olga, Olive, Ollie, Omega, Ora, Patsy/Patsie, Patty/Pattie, Polly, Rae/Ray(e), Reba, Rhea, Rhoda, Rita, Rosa, Rose, Rosie, Roxie, Ruth, Sadie, Sally, Shirley, Sue, Theda, Thelma, Tommie/Tommy, Velma, Vera, Verda, Verna, Wanda, Wanza, Wendy, Wilda, Willa, Willie/Willy, Willow, Wilma, Winnie, Zada, Zelma Ann(e)
Bell(e)
Bess
Dean
Dell(e)
Donna
Gay(e)
Jean
Lee
Lou
Mae
Nell(e)
Rose
Ruth
Sue

Which old-fashioned double name do you like best? Would you consider using any of the pairings above for a modern-day baby?

P.S. I’ll follow this up in a few weeks with some old-fashioned double names for boys

Name snark from 1880

More old-timey name snark! This short article was published in a now-defunct Indiana newspaper in 1880.

The programmes of the school commencements—and our own High School is no exception to the rule—are made silly by “Nannies,” “Libbies,” “Kitties,” “Mamies,” and other pet names. No woman who drops the sensible “y” and spells her name with an “ie” termination will ever get beyond mediocre in any sphere. A pet name is for the household only. How everybody would smile if the male graduates insisted upon the same silly style, and were put down on the programmes as “Johnnies,” “Sammies,” “Jimmies,” etc. The literary nom de plume of a female author indicates to some extent the force of her mind; and we know just as well what to expect from the Lillie Linwoods and Mattie Myrtles as we do from the George Eliots. The former clearly foreshadows gush and twaddle, the latter suggests an idea of strength and common sense. You can scarcely pen a more suggestive satire against the helpfulness and independence of woman than to wrap her up in such terms of daily coddling and childish endearment as the pet names of Jennie, Nannie, Hattie, Minnie, Margie, Nettie, Nellie, Allie, Addie, Lizzie, and a host of others. How it lessens the dignity of any woman to be called by a baby name. For instance, persistently to call the two great chieftains of woman’s advanced status, Lizzie Cady Stanton and Susie B. Anthony, would crush, at one stroke, the revolution they have so much at heart. Under such sweet persiflage it would sink into languid imbecility, and furnish fresh food for laughter.

If I spelled my name “Nancie,” I would definitely use that “mediocre in any sphere” sentence as my Twitter bio.

Source: “Baby Names.” Saturday Evening Mail [Terre Haute] 26 Jun. 1880: 4.

Ten animals with interesting names

nipper, dog,
The “Victor” dog is named Nipper (not Victor).

Here are ten interestingly named animals to start the week:

  • Canuck, crow. He was hand-raised in Vancouver, Canada, and his ongoing crazy behavior is being chronicled via Facebook, naturally.
  • John L Sullivan, elephant. He was a circus elephant trained to “box” (standing on hind legs and wearing boxing gloves). He was named for boxing’s first heavyweight champion.
  • Mattie, donkey. He was the baby of a mama donkey rescued from the floodwaters of Hurricane Matthew last year.
  • Mrs. Chippy, (male) cat. He sailed with Ernest Shackleton aboard the Endurance. He was owned by the ship’s carpenter, whose nickname was Chippy.
  • Nipper, terrier mix. He was the model for the famous “His Master’s Voice” ads used originally by the Victor Talking Machine Company. He was named for the fact that he nipped at people’s legs.
  • Owney, border terrier. He was a stray dog who became the unofficial mascot of the Railway Mail Service in the late 1800s. He was named after an Albany postal worker called Owen.
  • Pot-8-os (or Potoooooooos), horse. He was a successful 18th-century racehorse. He “gained his extraordinary name by the stable-boy writing the word potatoes on his box, “potoooooooos.”” Other versions of the story spell the name other ways.
  • Tajiri, giraffe. He’s April’s calf, and his live birth was broadcast on YouTube [vid] earlier this year. His name was chosen via contest.
  • Uno, bear. She’s a bear at Katmai National Park whose missing part of one of her ears, hence the name Uno.
  • Wojtek, bear. He was adopted by members of the Polish II Corps during WWII. He was named by the soldiers.

Some previous animal names I’ve posted about include Dolly (sheep) and Mike Bison (buffalo).

Sources: