How popular is the baby name Turquoise in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Use the popularity graph and data table below to find out! Plus, see all the blog posts that mention the name Turquoise.

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Popularity of the baby name Turquoise


Posts that mention the name Turquoise

Girl names that end with a Z-sound

Girl names that end with a Z-sound

In the U.S., most of the names given to baby girls end with a vowel sound. And many of the remaining names end with an N-sound.

So, what about girl names that end with other sounds?

Below is a selection of girl names that end with a Z-sound, regardless of last letter. The names are ordered by current popularity.

Eloise
An English form of the French name Héloïse, which may be derived from a Germanic name made up of elements meaning “healthy, whole” and “wide.” Here’s the popularity graph for Eloise.

Rose
From the type of flower. Here’s the popularity graph for Rose.

Collins
From the surname, which has various possible derivations. Here’s the popularity graph for Collins.

Liz
A nickname for Elizabeth. Here’s the popularity graph for Liz.

Inez
An English form of the Spanish name Inés. Here’s the popularity graph for Inez.

Aries
From the zodiacical constellation (whose name means “ram” in Latin). Here’s the popularity graph for Aries.

Hayes
From the surname, which has various possible derivations. Here’s the popularity graph for Hayes.

Primrose
From the type of flower. Here’s the popularity graph for Primrose.

Praise
From the English vocabulary word. Here’s the popularity graph for Praise.

Blaise
The French form of the Roman name Blasius, meaning “lisping.” Here’s the popularity graph for Blaise.

Melrose
From the Scottish surname, which is derived from a place name made up of elements meaning “bare” and “moor.” Here’s the popularity graph for Melrose.

Rivers
A variant of the English surname River, which has several possible derivations. Here’s the popularity graph for Rivers.

Jewels
A form of the name Jules influenced by the English word jewel. Here’s the popularity graph for Jewels.

Rawlings
A variant of the English surname Rawling, which is derived from the name Raul. Here’s the popularity graph for Rawlings.

Harnaaz
A Hindi name made up of elements meaning “every” and “pride.” Here’s the popularity graph for Harnaaz.


Less-common girl names that end with a Z-sound include Mills, Rhodes, Jazz, Ceres, Mumtaz, Rollins, and Turquoise.

Which of the above do you like most? What others can you think of?

P.S. Here are lists of girl names that end with D-, K-, L-, M-, R-, S-, T-, and V-sounds.

Sources: SSA, Behind the Name, Aries – Wiktionary

Baby names associated with green: Ivy, Forest, Olive, Jade

green trees

Looking for baby names that are associated with green — including baby names that mean “green”?

If so, you’ve come to the right place! I’ve collected dozens of options for you in this post.

Before we get to the names, though, let’s take a quick look at what the color green represents…

Symbolism of green

What does the color green signify?

In Western cultures in particular, green can be symbolic of:

  • Nature
  • Growth
  • Wealth
  • Luck
  • Envy
  • Freshness
  • Quality

The overriding association with nature is due to the abundance of green plant life on Earth. Plants contain a green pigment called chlorophyll that allows them to absorb energy from light.

The color can also be associated with safety and permission, thanks to green traffic lights (which signal when it’s safe to proceed).

green ferns

Baby names associated with green

All of the names below are associated with the color green. The names range from common to uncommon, and their associations range from strong to slight.

Those that have been popular enough to appear in the U.S. baby name data are linked to their corresponding popularity graphs.

Alder
Alder trees have green foliage. The word alder is derived from the Old English word for the tree, alor. Here’s the popularity graph for Alder.

Aran
Aran is a Thai masculine name meaning “forest.” Here’s the popularity graph for Aran.

Aranya
Aranya is a Hindi gender-neutral name based on the Sanskrit word aranya, meaning “forest.” Here’s the popularity graph for Aranya.

Ash
Ash trees have green foliage. The word ash is derived from the Old English word for the tree, æsc. Here’s the popularity graph for Ash.

Aspen
Aspen trees have green foliage. The word aspen is derived from the Old English word for the tree, æspe. Here’s the popularity graph for Aspen.

Aurora
Aurora is part of both “aurora borealis” and “aurora australis” — the names of the polar lights, which are predominantly green. The polar lights are caused by solar wind (that is, charged particles emitted by sun) striking the Earth’s magnetic field. The word aurora means “dawn” in Latin. Here’s the popularity graph for Aurora.

Balsam
Balsam fir trees have dark green foliage. The name of the tree can be traced back to the Hebrew word basam, meaning “spice, perfume.” Here’s the popularity graph for Balsam.

Beryl
Beryl is a mineral that can be green. The name of the stone ultimately comes from the Ancient Greek word beryllos. (Green beryl is a paler green than emerald.) Here’s the popularity graph for Beryl.

Birch
Birch trees have green foliage. The word birch is derived from the Old English word for the tree, beorc. Here’s the popularity graph for Birch.

Björk
Björk is the Icelandic word for “birch.”

Blerim
Blerim is an Albanian masculine name based on the word blerim, meaning “greenness, verdure.” Here’s the popularity graph for Blerim.

Blerta
Blerta is an Albanian feminine name based on the word blertë, meaning “green.” Here’s the popularity graph for Blerta.

Burkni
Burkni is an Icelandic masculine name meaning “fern.”

Cactus
Cactus plants are typically green. The name of the plant is derived from the Ancient Greek word kaktos. Here’s the popularity graph for Cactus.

Cedar
Cedar trees have dark green foliage. The name of the tree ultimately comes from the Ancient Greek word kedros. Here’s the popularity graph for Cedar.

Celadon
Celadon is a pale grayish-green color. The name of the shade was inspired by a character named Céladon — a shepherd who wore pale green clothing — in the popular 17th-century French novel L’Astrée by Honoré d’Urfé.

Chloe
Chloe (or Chloë) is derived from the Ancient Greek word khloe, which referred to “the first green shoot of plants in spring.” Here’s the popularity graph for Chloe.

Chlora
Chlora is a variant of Chloris. Here’s the popularity graph for Chlora.

Chloris
Chloris, based on the Ancient Greek word khloros, meaning “pale green” or “greenish-yellow,” was the name of several figures in Greek mythology. Here’s the popularity graph for Chloris.

Clover
Clover leaves are green. The word clover is derived from the Old English word for the plant, claefre. Here’s the popularity graph for Clover.

Codrin
Codrin is a Romanian masculine name based on the word codru, meaning “forest.”

Cyan
Cyan is the bluish-green color halfway between green and blue on the visible spectrum. The name of the shade comes from the Ancient Greek word kyanos, meaning “dark blue.” Here’s the popularity graph for Cyan.

Cypress
Cypress trees have dark green foliage. The word cypress is derived from the Ancient Greek word for the tree, kyparissos. (In Greek mythology, a grieving boy named Kyparissos was transformed into a cypress tree.) Here’s the popularity graph for Cypress.

Douglas
Douglas is part of Douglas Fir — the name of a species of tree with dark green foliage. The tree was named in honor of Scottish botanist David Douglas. Here’s the popularity graph for Douglas.

Emerald
The word emerald refers to a vivid green variety of the mineral beryl. By extension, the word also refers to the green color of these crystals. The name of the stone can be traced back to the Ancient Greek word smaragdos, which referred to any green gemstone (including emerald, beryl, malachite, and jasper). Here’s the popularity graph for Emerald.

Emeraude
Emeraude is the French word for “emerald.” Here’s the popularity graph for Emeraude.

Esmeralda
Esmeralda is the Spanish word for “emerald.” Here’s the popularity graph for Esmeralda.

Evergreen
Evergreen trees retain their green foliage year-round. Here’s the popularity graph for Evergreen.

Fern
Fern fronds are green. The word fern is derived from the Old English word for the plant, fearn. Here’s the popularity graph for Fern.

Forest and Forrest
The word forest refers to a dense growth of trees and underbrush that covers a large area of land. It’s based on the Medieval Latin word foresta (or forestis). The more popular spelling of the name, Forrest, represents transferred usage of the English surname. The surname Forrest originally referred to a person who lived near or worked in a royal forest (that is, a forest owned by the sovereign and used as a hunting ground). Here are the popularity graphs for Forest and Forrest.

Giada
Giada is the Italian word for “jade.” Here’s the popularity graph for Giada.

Green
Green, of course, refers to the color green. :) Here’s the popularity graph for Green.

Greenlee
Greenlee comes from a habitational surname that can be traced back to the Old English words grene, meaning “green,” and leah, meaning “clearing, meadow.” Here’s the popularity graph for Greenlee.

Gretna
Gretna is part of Gretna Green — the name of the Scottish village that became famous in the late 18th century as an elopement destination for young English couples. The village name originally referred to the “green by Gretna,” with the word Gretna meaning “gravelly hill” (from the Old English elements greot, “grit,” and hoh, “heel” — denoting a hill shaped like the heel of a foot). Here’s the popularity graph for Gretna.

Haljand
Haljand is an Estonian masculine name based on the word haljas, meaning “green, verdant.”

Holly
Holly trees have green foliage. The word holly is derived from the Old English word for the tree, holen. Here’s the popularity graph for Holly.

Hunter
Hunter is a dark yellowish-green color. It was the shade of green worn by hunters during the 19th century. Here’s the popularity graph for Hunter.

Ivik
Ivik is a Greenlandic masculine name meaning “(blade of) grass.”

Ivy
The word ivy refers to any of several species of climbing or ground-creeping evergreen plants in the genus Hedera. By extension, it also refers to the deep green color of ivy’s foliage. Here’s the popularity graph for Ivy.

Jade
The word jade refers to two similar-looking minerals, nephrite and jadeite, that are commonly used as gemstones. By extension, it also refers to the green color of these minerals. Their common name can be traced back to the 16th-century Spanish term piedra de ijada, meaning “loin stone” (because the stone was thought to help cure loin and kidney ailments). Here’s the popularity graph for Jade.

Jandi
Jandi is a Korean feminine name meaning “grass.” Here’s the popularity graph for Jandi.

Kelly
Kelly is a bright green color. The Irish surname Kelly can be traced back to the Old Irish personal name Cellach. Here’s the popularity graph for Kelly.

Khidr and Khadir
Khidr, also spelled Khadir, is an Arabic masculine name meaning “green.” Here’s the popularity graph for Khadir.

Lakhdar
Lakhdar is an Arabic masculine name based on al-akhdar, meaning “the green.”

Laurel
Laurel trees have green foliage. The word laurel is derived from the Latin word for the tree, laurus. Here’s the popularity graph for Laurel.

Leaf
Leaf green is the bright yellowish-green color typical of plant leaves (due to the presence of chlorophyll). Here’s the popularity graph for Leaf.

Levert
Levert comes from the French surname LeVert, which is based on the Old French word vert, meaning “green.” Here’s the popularity graph for Levert.

Lin
Lin (second tone) is a Chinese name that can mean “valuable jade,” depending upon the character being used to write the name. Here’s the popularity graph for Lin.

Linden
Linden trees have green foliage. The word linden is derived from the Old English word for the tree, lind. Here’s the popularity graph for Linden.

Malachite
Malachite (pronounced MAL-uh-kiet) is a mineral that is green. The name of the mineral ultimately derives from the Ancient Greek word malache, meaning “mallow” — a reference to the resemblance between the color of malachite and the leaves of the mallow plant. Here’s the popularity graph for Malachite.

Matsu
Matsu is a Japanese feminine name that can mean “pine tree,” depending upon the kanji being used to write the name.

Matsue
Matsue is a Japanese name that can include the element Matsu. Here’s the popularity graph for Matsue.

Matsuko
Matsuko is another Japanese name that can include the element Matsu. Here’s the popularity graph for Matsuko.

Midori
Midori is a Japanese gender-neutral name that can mean “green, verdure,” depending upon the kanji being used to write the name. Here’s the popularity graph for Midori.

Mint
Mint leaves are green. Aromatic mint plants are part of the genus Mentha, the name of which derives from the Ancient Greek word minthe.

Minttu
Minttu is the Finnish word for “mint.”

Moss
Moss are small, flowerless plants that grow in dense green mats. The Old English word for “moss” was mos. Here’s the popularity graph for Moss.

Mynta
Mynta is the Swedish word for “mint.”

Mynte
Mynte is the Danish word for “mint.”

Myrtle
Myrtle trees have green foliage. The word myrtle is derived from the Ancient Greek word for the tree, myrtos. Here’s the popularity graph for Myrtle.

Oak
Oak trees have green foliage. The word oak is derived from the Old English word for the tree, ac. Here’s the popularity graph for Oak.

Oihan
Oihan is a Basque masculine name meaning “forest.”

Oihana
Oihana is the feminine form of Oihan.

Olive
The word olive refers to the fruit of the olive tree (Olea europaea). By extension, it also refers to the dark yellowish-green color of unripened olive fruit. (Ripened olives are black.) Here’s the popularity graph for Olive.

Olivine
Olivine is a mineral that is usually yellowish-green. The name of the mineral can be traced back to the Latin word oliva, meaning “olive.” Here’s the popularity graph for Olivine.

Oren
Oren is a Hebrew masculine name meaning “pine tree.” Here’s the popularity graph for Oren.

Orna
Orna is the feminine form of Oren. Here’s the popularity graph for Orna.

Qorsuk
Qorsuk is a Greenlandic masculine name meaning “green, yellowish-green.”

Pallav
Pallav is a Hindi masculine name based on the Sanskrit word pallava, meaning “shoot, sprout, young leaf.”

Pallavi
Pallavi is the feminine form of Pallav. Here’s the popularity graph for Pallavi.

Panna
Panna is a Hindi feminine name that can mean “emerald” or “leaf.”

Peridot
Peridot, a variety of the mineral olivine, is yellowish-green.

Phyllis
Phyllis, the Ancient Greek word for “foliage” (based on phyllon, meaning “leaf”) was the name of several figures in Greek mythology. Here’s the popularity graph for Phyllis.

Pilutaq
Pilutaq is a Greenlandic gender-neutral name meaning “leaf.”

Pine
Pine needles are green. The word pine is derived from the Latin word for the tree, pinus.

Sage
Sage leaves are grayish-green. The name of the sage plant (genus Salvia) can be traced back (via Old French sauge) to the Latin word salvus, meaning “healthy.” Here’s the popularity graph for Sage.

Sirkka
Sirkka is a Finnish feminine name that can be derived from the word heinäsirkka, meaning “grasshopper” (many of which are green), or from the word sirkkalehti, meaning “cotyledon” (the embryonic leaf of seed-bearing plants). Here’s the popularity graph for Sirkka.

Sylvain and Sylvaine
Sylvain (masculine) and Sylvaine (feminine) are the modern French forms of Silvanus. Here’s the popularity graph for Sylvain.

Silvana and Silvano
Silvana (feminine) and Silvano (masculine) are the modern Italian forms of Silvanus. Here are the popularity graphs for Silvana and Silvano.

Silvanus
Silvanus, based on the Latin word silva, meaning “wood, forest,” was the name of the Roman god of forests. Here’s the popularity graph for Silvanus.

Silvester
Silvester is derived from the Latin word silvestris, meaning “forested” or “of the forest.” Here’s the popularity graph for Silvester.

Silvestro
Silvestro is the Italian form of Silvester. Here’s the popularity graph for Silvestro.

Silvia and Silvio
Silvia (feminine) and Silvio (masculine) are the modern Italian and Spanish forms of Silvius. Here are the popularity graphs for Silvia and Silvio.

Silvius
Silvius was a Roman masculine name based on the Latin word silva, meaning “wood, forest.”

Sylvester
Sylvester is a variant of Silvester. Here’s the popularity graph for Sylvester.

Sylvia
Sylvia is a variant of Silvia. Here’s the popularity graph for Sylvia.

Talar
Talar (also spelled Dalar) is an Armenian feminine name based on the word talar or dalar, meaning “green, verdant.” Here’s the popularity graph for Talar.

Teal
Teal is a dark bluish-green color. The shade was named after the Eurasain teal (Anas crecca), a type of duck with a teal-colored stripe on its head. Here’s the popularity graph for Teal.

Thao
Thao is a Vietnamese gender-neutral name meaning “herbs, grass.” Here’s the popularity graph for Thao.

Turquoise
Turquoise (pronounced TUR-koyz) is a mineral that is sometimes bluish-green. The name of the stone can be traced back to the Old French term pierre tourques, meaning “Turkish stone.” Though it was mined in Persia, the stone was introduced to Europe in the 13th century by Turkish traders. Here’s the popularity graph for Turquoise.

Uumaaq
Uumaaq is a Greenlandic masculine name meaning “fresh, green (plant).”

Vipin
Vipin is a Hindi masculine name based on the Sanskrit word vipina, meaning “forest.”

Viridian
Viridian is a bluish-green color. The name of the pigment comes from the Latin word viridis, meaning “green.” Here’s the popularity graph for Viridian.

Viridiana
Viridiana is the feminine form of Viridian. Here’s the popularity graph for Viridiana.

Willow
Willow trees have green foliage. The word willow is derived from the Old English word for the tree, welig. Here’s the popularity graph for Willow.

Zumra
Zumra is a Turkish feminine name based on the word zümrüt, meaning “emerald.” Here’s the popularity graph for Zumra.


Can you think of any other names that have a connection to the color green?

P.S. Want to see more color-related baby names? Here are lists of red, orange, yellow, blue, and purple names.

Sources:

Images:

[Latest update: Dec. 2023]

Baby names associated with blue: Navy, Azure, Indigo, Sky

blue sky

Looking for baby names that are associated with the color blue — including baby names that mean “blue”?

If so, you’re in the right place! I’ve collected dozens of ideas for you in this post.

Before we get to the names, though, let’s take a quick look at what blue represents…

Symbolism of blue

What does the color blue signify?

In Western cultures in particular, blue can be symbolic of:

  • Trust
  • Calm
  • Sadness
  • Peace
  • Loyalty
  • Depth
  • Authenticity

It can also be associated with melancholy. “To have the blues,” for instance, is an expression meaning “to feel sad.”

blue water

Baby names associated with blue

All of the names below have an association with the color blue. The names range from traditional to unusual, and their associations range from strong to slight.

Those that have been popular enough to appear in the U.S. baby name data are linked to their corresponding popularity graphs.

Aciano
Aciano is the Spanish word for cornflower (Centaurea cyanus), a species of plant with flowers that are usually blue. Here’s the popularity graph for Aciano.

Afina
Afina is a Romanian feminine name meaning “blueberry.” Here’s the popularity graph for Afina.

Alice
Alice is part of “Alice blue” — a shade of blue named after Alice Roosevelt (the oldest daughter of U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt) in the mid-1910s. It was inspired by either the blue of Alice’s eyes or the blue of one of her dresses, sources disagree. The name Alice ultimately derives from the Germanic name Adalheidis, meaning “noble character” or “nobleness.” Here’s the popularity graph for Alice.

Web color "aliceblue" (hex value #F0F8FF)
(The web color aliceblue is a lot lighter than the original “Alice blue.”)

Ao
Ao is a Japanese name that can mean “blue,” depending upon the kanji being used to write the name. Here’s the popularity graph for Ao.

Aomi
Aomi is a Japanese name that can include the element Ao.

Aori
Aori is another Japanese name that can include the element Ao.

Aqua
Aqua is a greenish-blue color. The name of the shade comes from the Latin word aqua, meaning “water.” Here’s the popularity graph for Aqua.

Asuman
Asuman is a Turkish feminine name meaning “sky.”

Azul
Azul is the Spanish word for Azure. Here’s the popularity graph for Azul.

Azur
Azur is the French word for Azure. Here’s the popularity graph for Azur.

Azure
Azure is a sky-blue color. The name of the shade ultimately derives from the Arabic word lazuward, which refers to lapis lazuli. Here’s the popularity graph for Azure.

Azzurra and Azzurro
Azzurra (feminine) and Azzurro (masculine) are the Italian words for Azure. Here’s the popularity graph for Azzurra.

Beryl
Beryl is a mineral that can be blue. (Blue beryl is often called “aquamarine.”) The name of the mineral ultimately comes from the Ancient Greek word beryllos. Here’s the popularity graph for Beryl.

Blue
Blue, of course, refers to the color blue. :) Here’s the popularity graph for Blue.

Bluebell
Bluebell flowers are blue. “Bluebell” is the common name of plants of various genera (including Hyacinthoides).

Bluebird
Bluebird is a type of bird with predominantly blue plumage. “Bluebird” is the common name of birds in the North American genus Sialia.

Bluejay
Bluejay is another type of bird with predominantly blue plumage. “Bluejay” is the common name of the bird species Cyanocitta cristata.

Caelum
Caelum is the Latin word for “sky, heaven.” (Though it’s used as a name in modern-day America, it was simply a vocabulary word in Ancient Rome.) Here’s the popularity graph for Caelum.

Cielo
Cielo is a modern Spanish feminine name based on caelum. Here’s the popularity graph for Cielo.

Cerulean
Cerulean is a sky-blue color. The word may ultimately be derived from caelum. Here’s the popularity graph for Cerulean.

Chicory
Chicory flowers are typically blue. “Chicory” is the common name of the plant species Cichorium intybus.

Chóro
Chóro is a Hopi name meaning “blue-bird.”

Chórzhoya
Chórzhoya is a Hopi name meaning “little blue-bird.”

Cobalt
Cobalt is a vivid shade of blue. Cobalt pigment was originally made from the metallic element cobalt. Here’s the popularity graph for Cobalt.

Cyan
Cyan is the greenish-blue color halfway between blue and green on the visible spectrum. The name of the shade comes from the Ancient Greek word kyanos, meaning “dark blue.” Here’s the popularity graph for Cyan.

Darya
Darya (pronounced dar-YOH) is a Persian feminine name meaning “sea, ocean.” Here’s the popularity graph for Darya.

Denim
Denim fabric is traditionally blue, as it was originally dyed with indigo. The name of the textile is derived from the French phrase serge de Nîmes, which referred to fabric produced in Nîmes, a town in southern France. Here’s the popularity graph for Denim.

Deniz
Deniz (pronounced deh-neez) is a Turkish gender-neutral name meaning “ocean.” Here’s the popularity graph for Deniz.

Fayruz
Fayruz is an Arabic feminine name meaning “turquoise (the stone).”

Gentian
Gentian (pronounced jen-shun) flowers are often blue. According to Pliny, the genus Gentiana was named in honor of Illyrian king Gentius, who is said to have discovered the plant’s medicinal properties. The name Gentian is traditional in Albania, the territory of which was inhabited by Illyrian tribes during ancient times.

Gentiana
Gentiana is the modern Albanian feminine form of Gentian. Here’s the popularity graph for Gentiana.

Glory
Glory (besides being a vocabulary word) is part of “morning glory” — the common name of flowering plants in the family Convolvulaceae. Morning glory flowers are sometimes blue. Here’s the popularity graph for Glory.

Gökçe
Gökçe (pronounced gok-cheh) is a Turkish gender-neutral name meaning “sky blue.”

Haneul
Haneul is a Korean gender-neutral name meaning “sky.”

Hyacinth
Hyacinth flowers are sometimes blue. The genus Hyacinthus was named for the plant’s association with the myth of Hyacinthus (who was one of the lovers of Apollo in Greek mythology). Here’s the popularity graph for Hyacinth.

Indigo
The word indigo refers to flowering plants of the genus Indigofera — particularly the species Indigofera tinctoria — or to the dye made from the leaves of these plants. By extension, it also refers to the purplish-blue color of this dye. The name of the plant can be traced back to the Ancient Greek word Indikón, meaning “Indian,” as the plant is native to India. (It’s no coincidence that the British Royal Navy began using indigo dye extensively during the years that the British East India Company was gaining control over the Indian subcontinent.) Here’s the popularity graph for Indigo.

Jurate
Jurate (pronounced YOO-rah-teh) is a Lithuanian feminine name based on the word jura, meaning “sea.” Here’s the popularity graph for Jurate.

Kai
Kai is a Hawaiian gender-neutral name meaning “sea.” Here’s the popularity graph for Kai.

Kekai
Kekai is a Hawaiian gender-neutral name meaning “the sea.” Here’s the popularity graph for Kekai.

Kallfu
Kallfu is a Mapuche feminine name based on the word kallfü, meaning “blue.”

Kallfuray
Kallfuray is a Mapuche feminine name meaning “blue flower.”

Kyanite
Kyanite is a mineral that is usually blue. The name of the mineral is based on the Ancient Greek word kyanos, meaning “dark blue.” Here’s the popularity graph for Kyanite.

Lafken
Lafken is a Mapuche name meaning “sea, ocean.”

Lake
Lake water sometimes appears blue. Here’s the popularity graph for Lake.

Lani
Lani is a Hawaiian gender-neutral name meaning “sky.” Here’s the popularity graph for Lani.

Larimar
Larimar is a light blue variety of the mineral pectolite. Its name, coined in the 1970s, is a combination of Larissa (the name of the daughter of one of the stone’s discoverers) and mar, the Spanish word for “sea.” Here’s the popularity graph for Larimar.

Lazuli
Lazuli is part of “lapis lazuli” (pronounced LA-piss LA-zuh-lee) — the name of a deep-blue gemstone. The word lazuli can be traced back (via Latin lazulum and Arabic lazuward) to the place-name Lajward — a region in central Asia where the stone was mined. (The Latin word lapis simply means “stone.”) Here’s the popularity graph for Lazuli.

Livia and Livio
Livia (feminine) and Livio (masculine) are the modern Italian forms of the Roman family name Livius, which is thought to derive from the Latin word lividus, meaning “bluish.” Here are the popularity graphs for Livia and Livio.

Lobelia
Lobelia (pronounced loh-BEEL-ee-uh) flowers are often blue. The genus Lobelia was named in honor of Flemish botanist Matthias de l’Obel.

Lupine
Lupine flowers are sometimes blue. The genus name Lupinus is derived from the Latin word lupinus, meaning “wolfish” (from lupus, “wolf”). Here’s the popularity graph for Lupine.

Mayim
Mayim is the Hebrew word for “water.” (Though it’s used as a name among English speakers, it’s simply a vocabulary word among Hebrew speakers.) Here’s the popularity graph for Mayim.

Maya
Maya is a Hebrew feminine name based on mayim. It also happens to be a Zuni word meaning “crested blue-jay.” Here’s the popularity graph for Maya.

Mira and Meera
Mira, also spelled Meera, is a Hindi feminine name based on the Sanskrit word mira, meaning “sea, ocean.” Here are the popularity graphs for Mira and Meera.

Moana
Moana is a gender-neutral name meaning “ocean” in Hawaiian, Maori, Samoan, Tongan, and other Polynesian languages. Here’s the popularity graph for Moana.

Miosotis
Miosotis is the Spanish form of Myosotis. Here’s the popularity graph for Miosotis.

Myosotis
Myosotis (pronounced my-oh-SOH-tiss) flowers, also known as forget-me-nots, are frequently blue. The genus name Myosotis, meaning “mouse’s ear” in Latin, refers to the shape of the petals.

Navy
In the mid-18th century, officers in Britain’s Royal Navy began wearing uniforms that were dyed blue with indigo. The pigment was particularly colorfast (i.e., able to withstand exposure to sun and salt water), so, over time, other countries began to use it for naval dress as well. The dark shade of blue eventually came to be known as “navy blue.” The word navy refers to a country’s collective sea force. It comes (via French) from the Latin word navigia, meaning “vessels, ships, boats.” Here’s the popularity graph for Navy.

Nila and Neela
Nila, also spelled Neela, is a Hindi feminine name based on the Sanskrit word nila, meaning “dark blue” or “blue.” Here are the popularity graphs for Nila and Neela.

Nilam and Neelam
Nilam, also spelled Neelam, is another Hindi feminine name based on the Sanskrit word nila. Here are the popularity graphs for Nilam and Neelam.

Nilgün
Nilgün is a Turkish feminine given name based on the Persian word nilgun, meaning “indigo (the color).”

Ocean
The word ocean refers to the vast body of salt water that covers over 70% of the earth’s surface — or to any of the five large bodies of water (Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, Antarctic, or Arctic) into which it is divided. Here’s the popularity graph for Ocean.

Rayleigh
Rayleigh scattering explains why the sky is blue. The process — which involves electromagnetic radiation (such as visible light) being scattered by particles much smaller in size than the wavelength of that radiation — was named after British physicist John William Strutt, third Baron Rayleigh, who first described it in 1871. Here’s the popularity graph for Rayleigh.

Safira
Safira is the Portuguese word for “sapphire.” Here’s the popularity graph for Safira.

Sagar
Sagar is a Hindi masculine name meaning “sea, ocean.” Here’s the popularity graph for Sagar.

Sama and Samaa
Sama, also spelled Samaa, is a an Arabic feminine name meaning “sky.” Here are the popularity graphs for Sama and Samaa.

Sapphire
The word sapphire refers to the blue variety of the mineral corundum. By extension, it also refers to the blue color of these crystals. The name of the stone can be traced back to the Ancient Greek word sappheiros, which is thought to have referred to lapis lazuli originally (not to sapphire as we know it today). Here’s the popularity graph for Sapphire.

Shyam
Shyam is a Hindi masculine name based on the Sanskrit word shyama, meaning “dark blue.” Here’s the popularity graph for Shyam.

Sky
The word sky refers to the upper atmosphere, which is bright blue on clear days. It’s based on the Old Norse word ský, which meant “cloud” (ironically). Here’s the popularity graph for Sky.

Sini
Sini is a Finnish feminine name meaning “blue.”

Sora
Sora is a Japanese gender-neutral name meaning “sky.” Here’s the popularity graph for Sora.

Sunil
Sunil is a Hindi masculine name derived from the Sanskrit word sunila, meaning “very blue.” Here’s the popularity graph for Sunil.

Tchelet
Tchelet is a Hebrew feminine name meaning “sky blue.”

True
True (besides being a vocabulary word) is part of “true blue” — an expression that means “loyal, faithful.” The association between the color blue and the idea of loyalty or constancy may been inspired by the unchanging blue of the sky. Here’s the popularity graph for True.

Turquoise
Turquoise (pronounced TUR-koyz) is a mineral that is typically greenish-blue. The name of the stone can be traced back to the Old French term pierre tourques, meaning “Turkish stone.” Though it was mined in Persia, the stone was introduced to Europe in the 13th century by Turkish traders. Here’s the popularity graph for Turquoise.

Umi
Umi is a Japanese feminine name that can mean “sea,” depending upon the kanji being used to write the name. Here’s the popularity graph for Umi.

Umiko
Umiko is a Japanese name that can include the element Umi.

Zafiro
Zafiro is the Spanish word for “sapphire.” Here’s the popularity graph for Zafiro.


Can you think of any other names that have a connection to the color blue?

P.S. Want to see more color-related baby names? Here are lists of red, orange, yellow, green, and purple names.

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[Latest update: Nov. 2023]

New gemstone baby names

kyanite
Kyanite

We’re very familiar with gemstone baby names names like Ruby, Opal and Jade. But you probably haven’t met anyone (yet) with one of the following names:

  • Citrine: Citrine debuted in the SSA data in 2019. Citrine is an orange-y variety of quartz. It’s one of the birthstones for November.
  • Kyanite: Kyanite debuted in 2019 as well. Kyanite is typically blue, and its name is related to the color word “cyan.”
  • Malachite: Malachite debuted in 2017. Malachite is a green-banded mineral. Its name refers to the leaves of the mallow plant.
  • Lazuli: Lazuli, part of the rock name lapis lazuli (which translates to “stone of azure”), debuted in 2016.

These newbies join the many gem-names — Amethyst, Angelite, Beryl, Celestine, Diamond, Emerald, Garnet, Jasper, Larimar, Obsidian, Olivine, Onyx, Sapphire, Topaz, Turquoise, etc. — that have previously appeared in the SSA data. (Not to mention the rock names Coal, Flint, Granite, Shale, and Slate.)

I’m sure Citrine and Kyanite won’t be the last of the names in this category to emerge in the data, though, because there are just so many other nicely-named minerals and rocks out there. Some examples…

  • Agate: a banded, colored quartz with a name that happens to look and sound similar to Agatha.
  • Alexandrite: a color-changing variety of chrysoberyl named after Alexander II of Russia. It’s one of the birthstones for June.
  • Ametrine: a type of quartz with zones of purple and yellow/orange; a mix of amethyst and citrine.
  • Carnelian: a red variety of quartz. Its name can be traced back to the Latin word conus, the name of a type of berry.
  • Peridot: a green gemstone with a name of unknown origin. It’s the birthstone for August.
  • Selenite: a type of gypsum. Its name comes from the ancient Greek word for “moon,” selene. (If you’ve ever watched metaphysical content on YouTube, you’ve probably seen a selenite wand before…)
  • Tourmaline: a gem that comes in a wide variety of colors. It’s one of the birthstones for October.

Which gem/mineral/rock name do you think we’ll spot next in the U.S. baby name data?

Image: Kyanite by Elade53