3 Names: Seagull, Free, Season

Emmy-winning actress Barbara Hershey (born Barbara Herzstein) was associated with several interesting names early in her career.

First, there was Seagull.

She changed her stage name to “Barbara Seagull” after accidentally killing a seagull while filming a scene for the 1969 movie Last Summer.

“I felt her spirit enter me,” she explained later. “It was the only moral thing to do.”

Then, there was Free.

She was in a relationship with fellow actor David Carradine in the late ’60s and early ’70s, and in 1972 they welcomed a son named Free.

Finally, there was Season.

She and David Carradine broke up in part because of an affair he had with actress Season Hubley, who’d been a guest star on his TV show Kung Fu (and who we talked about yesterday).

Eventually, two of these three names were changed. Barbara returned to the surname Hershey around the time of the break-up, and Free changed his named to Tom at the age of nine “after relentless teasing.”

Source: Barbara Hershey Drops Her Hippie Past and a Name, Seagull, and Her Career Finds Wings, A Kung Fu Comeback?


The Baby Name “Season”

lolly madonna, season hubley, baby name, 1970sIn 1973, the name “Season” debuted in the U.S. baby name data rather impressively. (It wasn’t the top debut of the year, but it was in the top 10, just above Sacheen.)

  • 1976: 61 baby girls named Season
  • 1975: 66 baby girls named Season
  • 1974: 68 baby girls named Season
  • 1973: 28 baby girls named Season
  • 1972: unlisted
  • 1971: unlisted

Word-based baby names like “Season” are notoriously hard to figure out, but I eventually stumbled upon the influence: actress Season Hubley, whose birth name was Susan.

Her first major role was as the title character in the movie Lolly-Madonna XXX, which was released in early 1973. The film depicted two feuding families in rural Tennessee. It was based on the Sue Grafton novel The Lolly-Madonna War (1969).

Usage of the name peaked in 1979 — the year Season played Priscilla Presley in the made-for-TV movie Elvis, for which she is best remembered. She married her Elvis co-star Kurt Russell that year as well.

Season and Kurt had a son in 1980 (before divorcing in 1983) and named him Boston. Their usage of the name gave it a slight boost in ’81, but didn’t kick off the high usage that was to come in the early 2000s.

And now for the question of the day: If you were having a baby girl and had to choose either Susan or Season for the first name, which one would you pick?

P.S. One of Season’s siblings was actor Whip Hubley (birth name: Grant Hubley), who played “Hollywood” in Top Gun. So far, “Whip” has never been in the SSA data.

Popular Baby Names in Sweden, 2017

According to Statistics Sweden, the most popular baby names in the country in 2017 were Alice and William.

Here are Sweden’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Alice, 888 baby girls
2. Alicia, 675
3. Olivia, 634
4. Ella, 607
5. Ebba, 594
6. Lilly, 577
7. Astrid, 572
8. Saga, 569
9. Freja, 568
10. Wilma, 556

Boy Names
1. William, 941 baby boys
2. Oscar, 896
3. Liam, 823
4. Lucas, 793
5. Oliver, 765
6. Alexander, 701
7. Elias, 681
8. Hugo, 670
9. Noah, 654
10. Adam, 613

In the girls’ top 10, Astrid, Freja and Saga replace Maja, Elsa, and Julia.

In the boys’ top 10, Adam replaces Charlie.

“Maryam and Matteo have risen the most in 2017.”

In 2016, the top two names were Alice and Oscar.

Source: Name Statistics – Statistics Sweden

Name Snark from 1880

More old-timey name snark! This short article was published in a now-defunct Indiana newspaper in 1880.

The programmes of the school commencements—and our own High School is no exception to the rule—are made silly by “Nannies,” “Libbies,” “Kitties,” “Mamies,” and other pet names. No woman who drops the sensible “y” and spells her name with an “ie” termination will ever get beyond mediocre in any sphere. A pet name is for the household only. How everybody would smile if the male graduates insisted upon the same silly style, and were put down on the programmes as “Johnnies,” “Sammies,” “Jimmies,” etc. The literary nom de plume of a female author indicates to some extent the force of her mind; and we know just as well what to expect from the Lillie Linwoods and Mattie Myrtles as we do from the George Eliots. The former clearly foreshadows gush and twaddle, the latter suggests an idea of strength and common sense. You can scarcely pen a more suggestive satire against the helpfulness and independence of woman than to wrap her up in such terms of daily coddling and childish endearment as the pet names of Jennie, Nannie, Hattie, Minnie, Margie, Nettie, Nellie, Allie, Addie, Lizzie, and a host of others. How it lessens the dignity of any woman to be called by a baby name. For instance, persistently to call the two great chieftains of woman’s advanced status, Lizzie Cady Stanton and Susie B. Anthony, would crush, at one stroke, the revolution they have so much at heart. Under such sweet persiflage it would sink into languid imbecility, and furnish fresh food for laughter.

If I spelled my name “Nancie,” I would definitely use that “mediocre in any sphere” sentence as my Twitter bio.

Source: “Baby Names.” Saturday Evening Mail [Terre Haute] 26 Jun. 1880: 4.

Names of the Five Moons [Poll]

The Five Moons were five professional ballerinas — all born in the 1920s, all with Native American ancestry, and all with roots in the state of Oklahoma — who achieved international success in the mid-20th century. Their names were:

  • Rosella Hightower
  • Moscelyne [moss-eh-leen] Larkin
  • Maria Tallchief
  • Marjorie Tallchief
  • Yvonne Chouteau

(Maria and Marjorie were sisters.)

“Oklahoma’s five American Indian ballerinas would all premiere with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo: Hightower debuted in 1938, Maria Tallchief in 1942, Chouteau in 1943, Marjorie Tallchief in 1946 and Larkin in 1948.”

Which of their first names do you like the most?

Which "Five Moons" name do you like best?

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Source: Thomas, Fran L. “The legacy of five Oklahoma American Indian ballerinas continues to shape lives.” Oklahoma Gazette 15 Jan. 2009.