How popular is the baby name Crimson in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Crimson.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Crimson


Posts that Mention the Name Crimson

Babies Being Named for College Football QB Colt McCoy?

I mentioned babies getting dog names the other day, so now let’s talk about a name associated with horses: Colt.

Colt, like King and Jett, has become more popular recently. After ranking 534th in 2008, it jumped 164 spots to reach 370th in 2009.

Why? A CNBC reporter says the reason is former University of Texas quarterback Daniel “Colt” McCoy.

In fact, the rise of the name mirrors McCoy’s career. Not bad considering the name was barely cracking the top 1000 when McCoy arrived on national scene four years ago.

It’s a sound theory. Colt did indeed enter the top 1,000 in 2005–the year that McCoy began playing college football.

But let’s not forget two things.

First, Colt wasn’t a top 1,000 virgin in 2005. It had been in the top 1,000 from 1982 all the way to 2002 — over two decades. This original run was sparked by Colt Seavers, a character played by Lee Majors on the television series The Fall Guy (1981-1986).

Second, there’s the influence of Colton. It first cracked the top 1,000 in 1982 as well (again thanks to Colt Seavers). Unlike Colt, though, Colton became more popular as time went on. So now, a few decades later, the still-trendy sound of Colton may be paving the way for the re-introduction of Colt.

And now a question for you: In terms of college football-related baby names, which do you like better, Colt or Crimson?

Source: Parents Naming More Kids Colt

Baby Name Warning from 1942

Unusual baby names are discussed regularly online, in entertainment magazines, even on late night TV. But I don’t often see the topic come up in old newspapers, which is why I was surprised to find the following in a 1942 issue of the Spokane Daily Chronicle:

News pictures recently gave publicity to a baby who was born during a practice air-raid blackout and whose mother hit on the expediency of naming her Dawn Siren. Another baby has been named Victory Pearl Harbor.

These names did not impress our anonymous reporter:

Herewith is a brief for all children whose parents give them unusual mirth-provoking or humiliating names. The offending fathers and mothers may be well meaning enough and in some cases the names have significance at the time they are given, but before long the child is hanging his head in shame under the storm of derision of his playmates, or blushing when he gives his name for the roll at school.

Dawn and Victory seem tame nowadays…makes me wonder what this person would have had to say about Aussie, Crimson and Marijauna.

Source: “What’s in a name? Plenty.” Spokane Daily Chronicle 6 Jan. 1942: 4.

Two More Baby Names from Sports – McCarthy and Vetch

Last week’s post on Crimson Tide, the Alabama baby who was named after a football team, reminded me of two UK babies who were also named in honor of football teams. (Well, soccer teams.)

  • McCarthy Campbell, born in 2004, was named after Mick McCarthy, who was the manager of Sunderland A.F.C. from 2003 to 2006. The baby’s dad had originally wanted his son’s initials to be S.A.F.C., but mom nixed that idea and suggested McCarthy instead.
  • Imogen Chloe Vetch Price, also born in 2004, was named in part after Vetch Field, which was the home of Swansea City A.F.C. from 1912 to 2005. The field was named for the vetch that had once grown there.

If Imogen had been born a few years later, she could have been named for Liberty Stadium, which is where Swansea now plays. Liberty might not be as significant a location as Vetch, but it certainly makes a prettier name.

Sources: Baby named after Black Cats boss, Baby named after Vetch

Baby Named Crimson Tide After Alabama Football Team

Nope, this isn’t an April Fools’ Day joke.

J.L. and Jackie Redd of Alabama, inspired in part by their surname, decided to name their baby boy Crimson Tide Redd in honor of the University of Alabama’s Crimson Tide football team.

J.L.’s family was “extremely excited” about the name, but Jackie’s family “couldn’t understand why we’d name our child after a football team.”

Little Crimson will go by the nickname Ty.

Thoughts?

Source: Tallassee Tribune (via Friends of the Program)

(Want to see other baby names inspired by college football?)

Phone Book Fishing in Mississippi, Part 6 – Clevester, Farold, Hix, Wilvie

Did you know that Kilgore Trout lives in Mississippi?

Kilgore Trout

It could be a joke, or it could be a real name. I have no idea. All I know is that I didn’t think anyone would believe me unless I posted a photo. :)

Other interesting names I found in the Hattiesburg section of the Mississippi phone book are below. (As usual, my favorites are in bold.)

Abbass
Adillia
Algarine
Alkeenia
Alpheaus
Altonyala
Amelai
Andronneka
Anise
Antelmo
Anzetta
Aonji
Aouida
Atheer
Athlene
Auxi
Averia
Ayeshalia
Belma
Berek
Bevonia
Bolynn
Bootsy
Breanuce
Burghard
Burlian
Caberzine
Captoria
Carestine
Cassenoe
Cavida
Chaquita
Charkarr
Cherish
Chesarea
Chezra
Chimbre
Chinica
Chinika
Cleven
Clevester
Cliffodean
Clotilee
Clydell
Comisha
Corsetta
Cotton
Coulis
Creshenda
Crimson
Curtresha
Dakala
Dardanchala
Daucenia
Dearyck
Decoffea
Deffrie
Dehoudra
Dekoshia
Delaina
Demarla
Detrick
Dondrick
Dontrez
Dorothera
Dorsetta
Eddena
Elatsky
Electa
Elixenia
Ellawese
Epitacio
Excell
Eudene
Fabulous
Famica
Fanisha
Farold
Feleafia
Festus
Florestine
Fransheka
Garlinda
Gathel
Gikita
Gladola
Glenisha
Glenneth
Glovenia
Hannelore
Heino
Herlene
Hix
Ilous
Imesia
Ion
Itaska
Janopy
Jaquely
Jeruthia
Jessiema
Jireh
J’Lyn
Johneen
Johniece
Kable
Kadandra
Karay
Kebryan
Keener
Keywanta
Kimual
Kimyanta
Kioushea
Krishond
Kylan
Lahrue
LaNae
LaNissa
Lavester
Legacy
Leketha
Leobardo
Lissa
Louester
Luartis
Lybia
Lyzle
Magnolia
Marquelene
Martrici
Maudel
Mazharul
McKenlie
Mecklin
Melaysja
Mheja
Micage
Micasio
Murtha
Nagen
Nakedia
Nakikia
Nanga
Natarsha
Nauwausa
Necoia
Needham
Nekerda
Nelcenia
Neretha
Neshanta
Nikrumah
Niyolkie
Noilette
Ognyan
Omeshia
Oneida
Onix
Orjan
Ovada
Patrict
Peanut
Pequitta
Phylistine
Picasso
Pippa
Plez
Quentice
Quill
Quitman
Randolyn
Rankin
Ranzeel
Raslyn
Raylawni
Remus
Renec
Renodda
Roddis
Rorilynn
Roweena
Rozellar
Seclester
Sedgey
Sedgie
Shaneka
Shannadoah
Shanthina
Shemshat
Shermonica
Shileria
Shiritia
Shtoria
Slay
Sondrell
Sparkman
Spellmon
Spooky
Stoy
Subrina
Sukhendra
Synarus
Synettra
Talantia
Tanangela
Tanjala
T’anna
Tannus
Tanzanzi
Tavares
Tavarius
Tawaski
Teayra
Tessecca
Texas
Theaola
Torjia
Torsky
Toxie
Treless
Trenidy
Trest
Troymane
Truett
Twannela
Twinette
Uerica
Undeva
Utahna
Vallorine
Viccki
Vonceil
Voncile
Voncille
Vyshawn
Wardelle
Wauteen
Weatta
Whakinda
Willie Glenn
Willoughby
Wilvie
Winsdale
Wirt
Wyomia
Yamilet
Yeghia
Zeakethia
Zedric
Zorana
Zykia

And that concludes this (rather extensive) round of phone book fishing. In case you missed them, here are the five earlier posts in the series: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 and Part 5.

P.S. Want to see some literature-inspired names (like Kilgore Trout)? Check out Unique Baby Names from Literature.