How popular is the baby name Emancipation in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, see baby names similar to Emancipation and check out all the blog posts that mention the name Emancipation.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Emancipation

Number of Babies Named Emancipation

Born in the U.S. Since 1880

Posts that Mention the Name Emancipation

Were Any Babies Named Gettysburg?

The Battle of Gettysburg, which lasted from July 1 to July 3, 1863, was a Civil War battle fought in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Were any babies named after the battle?

Yes, several.

In fact, the earliest two I know of represent the two sides of the conflict — north & south.

First, there’s Anne Gettysburg Veazey, born on July 7, 1863, in Vermont. She was the daughter of Col. Wheelock G. Veazey, who led the 16th Vermont Infantry at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Colonel Veazey’s return to his beloved Julia must have been especially joyous, since their first child, a daughter, had been born just four days after the guns fell silent at Gettysburg. They christened the little girl Anne Gettysburg Veazey.

Second, there’s Gettysburg Lee McCarter, born on July 19, 1863, in South Carolina. She went by the nickname Gettie (similar to the way Emancipation Proclamation went by the nickname Prockie). Gettie’s gravestone is below.

Gettysburg "Gettie" McCarter Cook

I’ve also found records for about 8 other babies named Gettysburg, including a female born into the Battle family of Alabama in 1878 and named “Gettysburg Battle.”

Source: Coffin, Howard. Nine Months to Gettysburg. Woodstock, VT: The Countryman Press, 1997.
Image: Gettie McCarter Cook by Chris Smith


43 Unique Noun-Names

I’m fascinated by personal names that, out of context, don’t appear to be names at all. Especially when said names are created from everyday nouns and proper nouns — places, foods, animals, objects, brands, ideas, events, institutions, organizations, qualities, phenomena, and so forth.

My fascination kicked into high gear after I wrote about noun-names earlier this year. Ever since, I’ve kept my eyes peeled for noun-names.

So far, I’ve collected hundreds. But it’s going to take me a while to blog about all of them. In the meanwhile, I thought I’d list some of the strangest ones I’ve already talked about:

  1. Bandit
  2. Cape Cod
  3. Captivity
  4. Celerie (celery)
  5. Danger
  6. Eclipse
  7. Emancipation Proclamation
  8. Emirates
  9. Eiffel Tower
  10. Facebook
  11. Fourth
  12. Freeway
  13. Funeral
  14. Golden Palace
  15. Halloween
  16. Helsinki
  17. Jeep
  18. Joker
  19. Key West
  20. Knuckles
  21. Legal Tender
  22. Metallica
  23. Oleomargarine
  24. Opera House
  25. Orbit
  26. Peaches
  27. Pebbles
  28. Peppermint
  29. Prohibition
  30. Rainbow
  31. Shotgun
  32. Skylab
  33. Soccer City
  34. Sou’Wester
  35. Strawberry
  36. Suffrage
  37. Tahiti
  38. Trooper
  39. Tsunami
  40. Union Jack
  41. Vick Vaporup (Vicks VapoRub)
  42. Wilmot Proviso
  43. Zeppelin

Did I skip any good ones? Let me know in the comments!

*

Later additions…

  1. Sputnik, 10/4
  2. Nintendo, 10/22
  3. Annexation, 10/25
  4. Windchime, 11/9
  5. Oregon Territory, 11/22
  6. Gold Dust, 11/29

My Top 40 Baby Name Stories

Open BookOf the hundreds of baby name stories I’ve posted so far, these are my 40 favorites (listed alphabetically).

  1. Actsapostles
  2. Airlene
  3. Aku
  4. Carpathia
  5. Cleveland
  6. Dee Day
  7. Dondi
  8. Emancipation Proclamation
  9. Frances Cleveland
  10. Georgia
  11. Grant
  12. Guynemer
  13. Ida Lewis
  14. Independence & Liberty
  15. Inte & Gration
  16. Invicta
  17. Iuma
  18. Jesse Roper
  19. Job-Rakt-Out-of-the-Asshes
  20. Karina
  21. Legal Tender
  22. Livonia
  23. Louisiana Purchase
  24. Maitland Albert
  25. Maria Corazon
  26. Mary Ann
  27. Medina
  28. Pannonica
  29. Pearl
  30. Poncella
  31. Return
  32. Robert
  33. Saarfried
  34. Salida
  35. Seawillow
  36. Speaker
  37. Speedy
  38. States Rights
  39. Thursday October
  40. Zeppelina

My favorite baby name stories tend to be those that I find most memorable. Several of them (e.g., Aku, Karina, Maitland) even taught me something new. In a few cases, it’s not the original story I like so much as something that happened later on in the tale (as with Georgia, Salida, Speaker).

The Baby Named Emancipation Proclamation

baby named emancipation proclamation

Did you know a baby girl born in Ohio during the Civil War was named Emancipation Proclamation?

It’s true!

Her father was journalist and publisher William T. Coggeshall (1824-1867), who served as State Librarian of Ohio from 1856 to 1862. During the first year of the Civil War, Coggeshall worked directly for Ohio governor William Dennison as well.

Through Dennison, Coggeshall became friends with President Abraham Lincoln. (In fact, according to his wife Mary, Coggeshall may have even foiled an early Lincoln assassination attempt.)

William and Mary had a total of six children. One of those six, a baby girl, arrived on September 20, 1862.

On the same day his daughter was born, Coggeshall received a telegram from Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase. The telegram revealed that President Lincoln had finished the final draft of his Emancipation Proclamation.

Coggeshall, an ardent Lincoln supporter, wanted to choose a baby name that commemorated the occasion. But he didn’t want to name his daughter before the Union took back Richmond, Virginia — the capital of the Confederacy.

Until then, they would call the baby “Girlie.”

The Emancipation Proclamation was signed and issued on the first day of 1863, but Richmond didn’t fall until April 3, 1865.

On that day, Coggeshall’s two-and-a-half year old daughter was finally named Emancipation Proclamation Coggeshall.

A schoolteacher later nicknamed her “Prockie,” though family members continued to call her “Girlie.”

She married a man named Thomas Addison Busbey and they had one child, Ralph. On the 1900 census, she’s listed as “E. Prockie.”

E Prockie Busbey photo

Her husband served as the mayor of South Vienna, Ohio, for several successive terms. She died while he was in office, in 1913. On her grave marker, as on the census, she’s identified as “E. Prockie.”

Sources:

Babies Named After Aviator Charles Lindbergh

Charles LindberghExactly 85 years ago today, 25-year-old Air Mail pilot Charles Lindbergh was in the middle of his non-stop, solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean.

His successful journey from New York City to Paris, which lasted from about 8 am on May 20 until about 10:30 pm on May 21, 1927, earned Lindbergh the $25,000 Orteig Prize and made him world-famous virtually overnight.

According to SSA data, hundreds of babies were named Lindbergh and Lindy that year:

Year Babies named Lindbergh Babies named Lindy
1930 31 boys 64 boys, 6 girls
1929 41 boys 84 boys, 14 girls
1928 71 boys 176 boys, 16 girls
1927 115 boys 234 boys, 27 girls
1926 12 boys 30 boys
1925 7 boys 11 boys, 8 girls
1924 ? boys 6 boys, 6 girls

Though the data makes it look like dozens of babies were named “Lindbergh” and “Lindy” prior to May of 1927, that’s probably not the case. It’s much more likely that these babies simply remained nameless until the event occurred. (At that time it wasn’t uncommon for American parents to wait months, sometimes years, to settle on a name. Emancipation Proclamation Coggeshall wasn’t named until she was two and a half, for instance.)

Here’s similar data from the SSDI (Social Security Death Index):

  • 1930: 15 babies with the first name Lindbergh
  • 1929: 21 babies with the first name Lindbergh
  • 1928: 51 babies with the first name Lindbergh
  • 1927: 70 babies with the first name Lindbergh
  • 1926: 5 babies with the first name Lindbergh
  • 1925: 1 babies with the first name Lindbergh
  • 1924: 0 babies with the first name Lindbergh

Lindbergh Long, orphan, north carolinaI spotted a Lindbergh (right) in a mid-1932 issue of North Carolina Christian Advocate. His age wasn’t mentioned, but he was probably born circa 1927.

The variant spellings Lindberg, Lindburgh and Lindburg also got a boost in 1927. The latter two debuted in the data that year, in fact.

And, of course, many babies were given the first-middle combo “Charles Lindbergh.” The following Charles Lindbergh babies made the news:

  • Charles Lindbergh, son of Mr. and Mrs. Horace E. Lindbergh of Cambridge, MA
  • Charles Lindbergh Bohannon, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bohannon of La Jolla, San Diego, CA
  • Charles Lindbergh Erickson, son of Mrs. and Mrs. Carl W. Erickson of Worcester, MA
  • Charles Lindbergh Hurley, son of Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Hurley of Sea Cliff, Long Island, NY

A few years later, in 1931, a Canadian baby who made headlines for being born in an airplane was also named after Lindbergh.

Sources:

  • “3 Babies Are Given Name of Air Ace.” Painesville Telegraph 23 May 1927: 1.
  • “New Born Baby Gets Lindbergh’s Name.” Border Cities Star [Windsor, Ontario, Canada] 23 May 1927: 14.
  • “San Diego Baby Is Named for Aviator.” Prescott Evening Courier 8 Jun. 1927: 1.

More aviation-related posts: Babies Named for First Transpacific Flight, Babies Named for Aviator Jack Vilas, Baby Names for Aviation Enthusiasts

Images: Lindbergh Received the Distinguished Flying Cross, North Carolina Christian Advocate