Black Panther Baby Names: T’Challa, Shuri, Nakia

black panther, baby namesThe much-anticipated movie Black Panther, which comes out today, is already guaranteed to be a success (based on strong advance ticket sales).

Even better? The film features lots of great names, many of which are currently uncommon.

The one I’m really keeping my eye on is T’challa, which was a one-hit wonder in the mid-1970s:

  • 1977: unlisted
  • 1976: unlisted
  • 1975: 8 baby boys were named Tchalla
  • 1974: unlisted
  • 1973: unlisted

(This was around the time the comic book character, who had been introduced in the ’60s, started being featured in his own storylines.)

Other character names from the movie include Shuri, W’Kabi, Nakia and Okoye. And some of the actors have notable names as well (Chadwick, Danai, Letitia).

How much of an impact do you think Black Panther will have on baby names in 2018? Which BP name has the potential to see the greatest increase in usage?

Source: Black Panther (film) – Wikipedia


Popular Baby Names in Queensland, 2017

According to the Queensland Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, the most popular baby names in the Australian state in 2017 were Charlotte and Oliver.

Here are Queensland’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2017:

Girl Names
1. Charlotte, 384 baby girls
2. Olivia, 335
3. Ava, 305
4. Amelia, 303
5. Mia, 287
6. Isla, 282
7. Harper, 244
8. Grace, 239
9. Ivy, 232
10. Evelyn, 231

Boy Names
1. Oliver, 510 baby boys
2. William, 438
3. Noah, 360
4. Jack, 348
5. Harrison, 296
6. Thomas, 289
7. Hudson, 278
8. Hunter, 273
9. James, 263
10. Henry, 259

In the girls’ top 10, Harper and Ivy replace Sophie and Emily.

In the boys’ top 10, Hudson, James and Henry replace Lachlan, Mason and Charlie

In 2016, the top two names were the same.

In the Queensland city of Toowoomba specifically, the top baby names of 2017 were Georgia and Oliver.

Sources: Charlotte and Oliver take the crown for Queensland’s most popular baby names in 2017, Top 100 Baby Names

For the Wine Lovers: Oenone & Oeneus

wine baby names, oenone, oeneus

Ok, first things first:

  • Oenone (Œnone) is a female name pronounced ee-NOH-nee.
  • Oeneus (Œneus) is a male name pronounced EE-nee-us.

Both names come from Greek mythology:

  • Oenone was a mountain nymph who was the first wife of Paris of Troy. (Paris later left her and took up with Helen — a move that eventually led to the Trojan War.)
  • Oeneus was a mortal king who, after learning how to make wine from the god Dionysus, introduced it to the region of Aetolia.

And both names are based on the same word: the ancient Greek oinos, meaning “wine.” (The modern words oenology and oenophile are also based on oinos.)

Since it’s St. Valentine’s Day, and I bet many of us will end up having a glass of wine at some point, I thought today would be the perfect day to talk about wine-based names.

I first spotted Oenone while reading about English author Daphne du Maurier, who had a research assistant named Oenone Rashleigh around the time she was writing her bestselling book The King’s General (1946). Interestingly, Daphne’s grandfather was George du Maurier, writer of Trilby (1894).

In terms of real-life usage, I’ve found very few people named Oeneus, but dozens named Oenone, mainly in England and America. I would have assumed that the usage of Oenone was kicked off by the poem “The Death of Oenone” (1829) by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, but records suggest that usage didn’t pick up until the last decades of the 19th century.

So now for the question of the day. Oenone (ee-noh-nee) and Oeneus (ee-nee-us) are clearly unique, and they have a meaning that would appeal to many…but they’re also very difficult to pronounce and spell. Do you think either one is a usable first name for a modern baby?

Popular Baby Names in Minnesota, 2017

According to the Minnesota Department of Health, the most popular baby names in the state in 2017 were Evelyn and Oliver.

Here are the top Minnesota baby names broken down by the mother’s race/ethnicity:

Top Girl Names

  • White: Evelyn
  • Native American: Mila
  • Hispanic: Camila
    • …excluding Mexican: Sofia
  • Black/African: Aisha
    • …excluding Somali: Ava
  • Asian: Olivia
    • …excluding Hmong: Olivia

Top Boy Names

  • White: Oliver
  • Native American: Elijah
  • Hispanic: Mateo
    • …excluding Mexican: Mateo
  • Black/African: Mohamed
    • …excluding Somali: Elijah
  • Asian: Aiden
    • …excluding Hmong: Aiden

In 2015, the top two names (overall) were Olivia and Jackson.

Source: What are the top baby names for 2017? It depends…

Mystery Monday: The Baby Name Dainette

Here’s a name I can’t quite figure out: Dainette. It popped up in the mid-1950s, dropped out of the data the next year, and never came back. It ended up as the highest-hitting one-hit wonder of 1955.

  • 1957: unlisted
  • 1956: unlisted
  • 1955: 14 baby girls named Dainette
  • 1954: unlisted
  • 1953: unlisted

Names with -ette and -etta endings (like Danette) were trendy at the time, but this doesn’t account for why Dainette would have appeared with more than a dozen babies and then disappeared just as suddenly.

I’ve checked all the usual sources — movies, TV shows, new stories, etc. — but so far I have zero theories about Dainette.

Does anyone out there have any ideas?