How popular is the baby name Louise in the United States right now? How popular was it historically? Find out using the graph below! Plus, check out all the blog posts that mention the name Louise.

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Popularity of the Baby Name Louise


Posts that Mention the Name Louise

Name Quotes #102: Dana, Besta, Jeter

Welcome to the latest batch of name quotes! Here we go…

From an interview with English actor Marcus Rutherford in British GQ:

Marcus Rutherford realised The Wheel Of Time was going to be a big deal when he heard about the baby names. It was his birthday, not long after he’d been cast as the young blacksmith Perrin Aybara in Amazon’s new big-budget adaptation of Robert Jordan’s epic fantasy book series, and he decided […] to check out some of the birthday wishes on Twitter from a handful of die-hard Wheel Of Time fan accounts. […] “A lot of it came in, then there was a picture of a newborn baby. And this guy was like, ‘This is Perrin, who’s just been born. I’ve named him after your character. He says happy birthday.'”

From an interview with Brazilian soccer player Oleúde José Ribeiro (translated from Portuguese):

Q: But, after all, is your name, Oleúde, inspired by Hollywood or not?

A: No, no, it was just a brilliant idea from my parents (laughs). Like it or not, this story always helped me, it drew the attention of reporters… the late Luciano do Valle always asked listeners to guess my name, saying that it was the capital of cinema, it had a lot of impact at the time. This Hollywood thing has become a legend, but it has nothing to do with it.

From the obituary of Dana Marie Ek in Fauquier Now:

Dana was born on October 19, 1995, in Astoria, Oregon. She was named after the Dana Glacier — located deep in the wilds of the Glacier Peak Wilderness Area, because her father thought it was the most beautiful place on heaven or earth.

From an MLB.com article recounting how Jeter Downs met Derek Jeter:

So the man named after Derek Jeter by his baseball-crazed mother — even though his father is a Red Sox fan — had never actually met Derek Jeter?

It finally happened last week in a random encounter on a road in South Florida — sort of.

“This last week, I was driving, me and my brother were driving to go to [the] train,” said Downs. “We’re in traffic. My brother sees this Range Rover pulling up. He was like, ‘Oh my God, is that Jeter?’ He honks and I wave at him.

“I’m doing training with Raul Ibanez, [Jeter’s former teammate]. I called Raul and said, ‘Tell [Derek] Jeter that the kid he was waving at was Jeter [Downs].’ So then he told him that and it was pretty cool that I met him that way.”

From an article about Manchester twins named Ronnie and Reggie (like the famous London criminals Ronnie and Reggie Kray):

[W]e found two sets of twins and siblings named Ronnie and Reggie, as well as some Ronnies on their own.

Among them are the adorable twins pictured above (main image). Their mum said: “I thought it was only me capable of calling mine Ronnie and Reggie.”

But she’s far from alone. As well as finding another pair of twins with the same names, Moston mum Kellie Smart shared a picture of her sons, five-year-old Reggie Urch and Ronnie Urch, who turns four next week.

“People stop me all the time and ask are they twins and laugh when I tell them their names,” said Kellie, also mum to teenagers Mollie and Thomas.

From a 2007 article called “You Are What Your Name Says You Are” in the New York Times:

Sociologists like Mr. Besnard observed that first names [in France] were often quick markers of social and educational status. As another Libération reader, an elementary school teacher, pointed out: “I can often guess the ‘profile’ of a child thanks to the first name. A ‘Maxime,’ a ‘Louise,’ a ‘Kevin,’ a ‘Lolita.’ It’s sad, but that’s how it often works.” That is, Maxime and Louise probably have wealthy parents, while Kevin and Lolita are more likely to have a working- or lower-middle-class background.

Indeed, bourgeois French parents are unlikely to give their children “Anglo-Saxon” names; Jennifer was the most popular name for girls from 1984 to 1986, but it’s a safe bet few Jennifers came from well-educated families. (The craze is commonly explained by the success of the TV series “Hart to Hart” in France at that time — Jennifer Hart was one of the title characters — while “Beverly Hills, 90210,” featuring a popular character named Dylan McKay, is sometimes blamed for the explosion of Dylans a few years later.)

And finally, a bevy of B-names from basketball player Bradley Beal’s “About Brad” page:

Born on June 28, 1993, and raised in St. Louis, Missouri, by Bobby and Besta Beal, there was little doubt that Brad would eventually be an athlete. Both parents played sports for Kentucky State — Bobby was a football player, Besta a basketball player.

[…]

There were four other people in Brad’s family who were instrumental in his development as an athlete, and ultimately, as a young man. His two older brothers, Bruce and Brandon, and his younger brothers, the twins Byron and Bryon.

Popular Baby Names in Belgium, 2020

According to data from Statistics Belgium, the country’s most popular baby names last year were Olivia and Arthur.

Here are Belgium’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2020:

Girl Names

  1. Olivia, 548 baby girls
  2. Emma, 529
  3. Mila, 489
  4. Louise, 432
  5. Lina, 411
  6. Alice, 361
  7. Sofia, 359
  8. Mia, 353
  9. Anna, 350
  10. Juliette, 332

Boy Names

  1. Arthur, 587 baby boys
  2. Noah, 564
  3. Jules, 543
  4. Louis, 499
  5. Lucas, 467 (tie)
  6. Liam, 467 (tie)
  7. Adam, 443
  8. Victor, 412
  9. Gabriel, 384
  10. Mohamed, 345

In the girls’ top 10, Sofia and Mia replaced Elena and Lucie.

The boys’ top 10 includes the same names, but in a different order.

In the girls’ top 100, the names that saw the largest increases in usage were Alba (+142%), Capucine (+55%), and Lea (+45%).

In the boys’ top 100, the names that saw the largest increases were Otis (+68%), Oliver (+34%), and Charles (+31%).

In each of Belgium’s three main regions, the top baby names were…

  • Flanders (about 58% of the population): Olivia and Noah
  • Wallonia (about 32%): Emma and Gabriel
  • Brussels-Capital Region (about 11%): Sofia and Mohamed

Finally, here’s a selection of baby names that were given to just 5 babies each in Belgium last year:

Rare Girl NamesRare Boy Names
Aubane, Bibi, Célou, Diyana, Emmelien, Frauke, Hadia, Ianthe, Jitte, Kessy, Lumi, Minthe, Noussayba, Oana, Phéline, Rokaya, Sabina, Thilly, Vaiana, Ylana, ZinebAurian, Baziel, Camiel, Dalil, Elyan, Fabrice, Haris, Imraan, Jorik, Kabir, Leart, Maëlio, Nélio, Ole, Peter, Runar, Shimon, Tiesj, Virgile, Yllan, Zayi

In 2019, the top two names in Belgium were also Olivia and Arthur.

Sources: First names for boys and girls | Statbel, Demographics of Belgium – Wikipedia

The 16 Children of William of Orange

William of Orange

Sixteenth-century Dutch nobleman William of Orange (also known as William the Silent) was the primary leader of the Dutch Revolt (1566-1648).

William had a total of 16 children with five different women (four wives, one mistress). All 16 received traditional first names, but four of his daughters were given location-inspired middle names — symbols of the political alliances between William and “the lands for which he fought.”

Here are the names of all 16:

  1. Maria (born in 1553)
  2. Philip William, (b. 1554)
  3. Maria (b. 1556)
  4. Justinus (b. 1559)
  5. Anna (b. 1562)
  6. Anna (b. 1563)
  7. Maurice August Philip (b. 1564)
  8. Maurice (b. 1567)
  9. Emilia (b. 1569)
  10. Louise Juliana (b. 1576)
  11. Elisabeth (b. 1577)
  12. Catharina Belgica (b. 1578)
  13. Charlotte Flandrina (b. 1579)
  14. Charlotte Brabantina (b. 1580)
  15. Emilia Antwerpiana (b. 1581)
  16. Frederick Henry (b. 1584)

Each of the regions/locations honored with a name responded by “bestow[ing] pensions upon the children”:

This inspired other parents with connections to the House of Orange-Nassau to adopt similar naming practices. For instance, Ernst Casimir I — the Stadtholder of Friesland, Groningen and Drenthe — named his daughter Elisabeth Friso (b. 1620). And Henri Charles de Le Trémoille — a direct descendant of William of Orange via Charlotte Brabantina — named his son Charles Belgique Hollande (b. 1655).

Sources:

  • Broomhall, Susan and Jacqueline Van Gent. Gender, Power and Identity in the Early Modern House of Orange-Nassau. London: Routledge, 2016.
  • Steen, Jasper van der. Memory Wars in the Low Countries, 1566-1700. Leiden: Brill, 2015.
  • William the Silent – Wikipedia

Popular Baby Names in Paris, 2020

According to Paris Data, the most popular baby names in Paris, France, in 2020 were (again) Louise and Gabriel.

Here are the city’s top 10 girl names and top 10 boy names of 2020:

Girl Names

  1. Louise, 208 baby girls
  2. Alice, 162
  3. Alma, 159
  4. Léa, 149
  5. Emma, 143
  6. Chloé, 141
  7. Jeanne, 140
  8. Anna, 138
  9. Rose, 136
  10. Lina, 127

Boy Names

  1. Gabriel, 312 baby boys
  2. Adam, 285
  3. Raphaël, 252
  4. Louis, 246
  5. Arthur, 242
  6. Victor, 190
  7. Mohamed, 188
  8. Joseph, 178
  9. Isaac, 175
  10. Léo, 162

In the girls’ top 10, Léa, Rose, and Lina replaced Adèle, Charlotte, and Joséphine.

In the boys’ top 10, Léo replaced Léon/Paul.

Finally, here’s a selection of names from lower down in the rankings (which, like the U.S. rankings, includes all names given to at least five babies per gender, per year).

Parisian Girl NamesParisian Boy Names
Clémence (54 girls), Aïcha (46), Capucine (38), Thaïs (36), Anaëlle (18), Salimata (16), Rym (12), Swann (7), Goundo (7), Maïwenn (6), Izïa (6), Armance (5)Côme (109 boys), Eden (61), Solal (51), Kylian (27), Orso, (17), Swann (16), Calixte (11), Sidy (8), Aliocha (8), Tidiane (8), Mylann (7), Chahine (6)

Source: Liste des prénoms – Paris Data

Babies Named for Sailing Ships (N)

The people below were born aboard — and named after! — ships with N-names…

  • Nackato:
    • Frederick Nackato Dickens, born in 1875
    • Ruth Nackato Bowick, born in 1875
  • Neckar:
    • Petrine Jeanette Hugo Neckar Walls, born in 1887
  • Nemesis:
    • Nemesis Louise Catherine Dupont, born in 1877
  • Nestor:
    • Nestorina Misonsnile, born in 1889
  • Nestorian:
    • Mary Nestorian Cowan, born in 1890
  • Neva:
    • Alice Neva Landham, born in 1886
  • Nevada:
    • Elizabeth Nevada West, born in 1872
    • William Nevada Webster, born in 1873
    • Nevada Atlantic Larsen, born in 1878
    • Mary Nevada Berry, born in 1881
    • Victoria Nevada Johnson, born in 1881
    • Marie Nevada McPhie, born in 1884
    • Nevada Christensen, born in 1887
  • Neville:
    • Gerald Neville Hemsworth, born in 1869
  • Niagara:
    • Fanny Elizabeth Niagara Pickard, 1875
  • Nile:
    • Nilena Thompson, born in 1866
    • Michelina Nilina Derosty, born in 1877
  • Nineveh:
    • Amelia Tabitha Nineveh Johns Adams, born in 1877
    • Nineveh Sydney, born in 1879
  • Norfolk:
    • Lilian Norfolk Beeching, born in 1880
  • Noronha:
    • Alice Noronha Yealland, born in 1878
  • Norseman:
    • Emily Norseman Stepp, born in 1866
  • North:
    • Adelaide North Hossack, born in 1875
  • Northam:
    • John Northam Davies, born in 1876
  • Northampton:
    • James Northampton Maughan, born in 1880
    • Ethel Northampton Jeffrey, born in 1882
    • William Northampton Irvine, born in 1882
  • Northumberland:
    • James Northumberland Byrne, born in 1873
  • Nourmahal:
    • Ellen Nourmahal Morrison, born in 1874
  • Nova Scotian:
    • Charles Nova Scotian Kuseley, born in 1860
    • Sarah Nova Scotia Keating, born in 1858
  • Nubian:
    • Edith Nubian Benwell Wootten, born in 1882
    • Nubian Jane Fisher, born in 1882
  • Nugget:
    • William Nugget Morant, born in 1860
    • Frederick Nugget Hurricks, born in 1860
  • Nyanza:
    • James Fisher Nyanza Allt, born in 1873

Do you think any of the ship names above work particularly well as human names?

Source: FamilySearch.org