Top Names on First Passports in Ireland, 2013

While we wait to see Ireland’s top baby names of 2013, here’s a list of the most common names on first passports for children under the age of three in Ireland:

Girl Names Boy Names
1. Emily, 455 passports
2. Emma, 404
3. Aoife, 397
4. Sophie, 392
5. Grace, 363
6. Ella, 350
7. Lucy, 336
8. Anna, 314
9. Ava, 307
10. Sarah, 296
11. Mia, 285
12. Amelia, 278
13. Caoimhe, 275
14. Lily, 268
15. Hannah, 268
16. Chloe, 255
17. Sophia, 230
18. Ruby, 229
19. Katie, 226
20. Kate, 220
1. Jack, 600 passports
2. James, 534
3. Daniel, 529
4. Conor, 508
5. Adam, 418
6. Ryan, 358
7. Harry, 347
8. Charlie, 344
9. Liam, 344
10. Dylan, 334
11. Luke, 325
12. Thomas, 313
13. Michael, 296
14. Noah, 291
15. Cillian, 287
16. Alex, 284
17. Cian, 277
18. Oisín, 265
19. Jamie, 265
20. Darragh, 262

Some of the differences between this list and the top baby names in Ireland in 2012:

  • Sean, 4th in births, is 23rd in passports
  • Lily, 5th in births, is 14th in passports
  • Aoife, 11th in births, is 3rd in passports
  • Anna, 22nd in births, is 8th in passports
  • Cillian, 23rd in births, is 15th on passports

Do you think these differences speak to socioeconomic status? For instance, do a higher proportion of low SES families opt for the baby names Sean and Lily — is that why these names aren’t as high as we’d expect on the passport list? (Families with less money to spare probably aren’t travelling internationally as often as other families.)

Sources: Which baby names are most common on first passports?, Passports Issued 2013 – 3 Years of Age or Under (pdf)


2 thoughts on “Top Names on First Passports in Ireland, 2013

  1. Another factor may be the passports issued to kids who got their Irish citizenship through their parents but weren’t born in Ireland.

  2. Yes, good point.

    Also the flip side of that — passports for kids born in Ireland, but whose in families originated outside of Ireland (but went there to work, say).

    These families wouldn’t be of high SES, but they would be more motivated than native Irish families to travel outside the country.

    (Though…these kids would also probably have conspicuous names. Polish names for kids whose parents are from Poland, for instance. Not something like “Sean.”)

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